AGCEEP_Specific_England.txt

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1419-1425: The Lollard Heresy for England
1419-1430: Maine and Anjou are ours for England
1422-1422: Henry VI's Minority for England
1422-1422: Henry VI's Minority for England
1422-1425: Jacqueline of Hainault for England
1422-1425: Jacqueline of Hainault for England
1424-1428: Treaty of Amsterdam for England
1424-1424: James's Marriage to Joan Beaufort for England
1424-1424: The King of Scots is Crowned for England
1425-1427: Jacqueline's Escape for Artois
1425-1426: Jacqueline is Captured for England
1425-1425: Beaufort and Gloucester Feud for England
1428-1436: Failure in the Low Countries for England
1428-1436: Failure in the Low Countries for England
1429-1430: Normandy is Laid to Waste for England
1430-1431: Maine and Anjou are Pacified for England
1431-1432: Henry VI is anointed in Paris for England
1435-1435: Bedford's Death for England
1436-1436: Richard, Duke of York for England
1437-1819: Failure in the Low Countries for England
1437-1437: Henry Declares His Minority Has Ended for England
1437-1437: Henry's Minority Comes to an End for England
1439: The Beauchamp Earl of Warwick is no more for England
1440-1445: The Duke of York Returns to France for England
1441: Eleanor Cobham's Witchcraft for England
1441: Eleanor Cobham's Trial for England
1442-1442: Gascogne Ravaged for England
1445-1450: The Marriage of Henry VI and Margaret of Anjou for England
1445-1450: The Truce at Tours for England
1445-1450: The Truce at Tours for England
1445-1446: The Lieutenancy of France for England
1445-1446: The Lieutenancy of France for England
1447-1450: Surienne's Disobedience for England
1447-1450: Surienne's Disobedience for England
1447: The Good Duke is charged with Treason for England
1447-1449: The Lieutenancy of Ireland for England
1449-1453: Debacle at Fougeres for England
1449-1450: Suffolk's Impeachment for England
1449-1453: Cade's Rebellion for England
1449-1453: Henry Resumes Crown Lands for England
1449-1453: Dartford for England
1449-1453: The Reading Parliament for England
1453-1454: King Henry's Illness for England
1455-1455: St. Albans for England
1455-1456: The Second Protectorate for England
1456-1457: York's Resignation and the Queen's Coup for England
1458-1459: The Great Council at Leicester for England
1458-1459: The Drogheda Parliament for England
1458-1459: The Parliament of Devils for England
1458-1460: The Duke of Buckingham is slain for England
1458-1460: Scottish Intervention for England
1458-1460: The Act of Accord for England
1459-1460: The Merchants of the Staple for England
1460: Edward's father is dead for England
1461-1461: Disaster at St. Albans for England
1461-1461: Battle of Towton for England
1461-1461: King Edward's Coronation for England
1461-1461: Micklegate Bar for England
1461-1462: Protecting Connaught for England
1461-1462: Protecting Desmond for England
1461-1462: Protecting Leinster for England
1461-1462: Protecting Scotland for England
1461-1462: Protecting Ulster for England
1461-1470: The Heirs of York for England
1461-1476: Lancastrian Resistance for England
1463-1467: Turncoat Percy for England
1464-1464: Somerset is Executed for England
1464-1466: Elizabeth Woodville for England
1466-1468: A Suitor for Duke Charles's Daughter for England
1466-1468: Isabelle and Anne Neville for England
1468-1468: Margaret of York and Charles Duke of Burgundy for England
1468-1469: Pembroke's Assault for England
1469-1469: Robin of Redesdale's Rebellion for England
1469-1469: Warwick's Betrayal for England
1469-1469: The King Remerges for England
1469-1469: Warwick and Clarence take flight for England
1470-1470: Warwick's landing and Montagu's Betrayal for England
1470: The Readeption for England
1471-1472: England's Remaining Possessions in France for England
1471: Battle of Tewkesbury for England
1471-1477: The Sonne in Splendour for England
1471-1819: Normandy is lost forever for England
1478-1478: Trial of George Duke of Clarence for England
1482-1500: Our Rule in Anjou and Maine are Finally Accepted for England
1482-1482: A new regime in Scotland for England
1483: Stony Stratford for England
1483: The Great Betrayal for England
1483: To Kill a King for England
1483: The Lancastrian Succession for England
1484: Titulus Regius for England
1485-1509: Court of the Star Chamber for England
1485-1509: Support Middle-class Bureaucrats for England
1485-1509: The Justices of Peace for England
1485: Hastings' Rebellion for England
1485: Bosworth Field for England
1485: The Court of King Edward for England
1487: Battle of Stoke for England
1488-1489: Crisis in Brittany for England
1488-1489: England Sends Reinforcements for England
1495-1515: The Admiralty for England
1495-1515: The Royal Army for England
1496-1506: The first exploration for England
1500-1500: Erasmus for England
1509-1521: The Enclosure Movement for England
1510-1512: The Holy League against France for England
1510-1512: The Holy League against France for England
1527-1529: The League of Schmalkalden for England
1534-1541: The Act of Supremacy for England
1536-1819: Welsh Act of Union for England
1536-1536: The Pilgrimage of Grace for England
Triggered (1542): King Henry's Offer for England
1544: The Rough Wooing for England
1546: Somerset's Invasion for England
1549-1554: The Prayer Book Rebellion for England
1549-1551: The Bear of Warwick for England
1551-1574: Sir Thomas Greshams Currency Reform for England
1553-1566: The Muscovy Trade Company for England
1553: The Nine Days' Queen for England
1553: Jane Grey and the Revolt against Northumberland for England
1554-1554: Bloody Mary and King Felipe of England for England
1558: The Protestant Succession for England
1558: The Protestant Succession for England
1559-1819: We have no hope in Calais for England
1559-1565: The Elizabethan Religious Settlement for England
1560-1566: The Merchant Adventures for England
1560-1600: English Support for the Dutch Rebels for England
1560-1600: English Support for the Dutch War of Independence for England
1562-1600: English Support for the French Huguenots for England
1566-1573: The Creation of the London Stock Exchange for England
1569: The Northern Rebellion for England
1570-1577: Elizabeth's Support for the Privateering of Sir Francis Drake for England
1570-1600: The Plantations of Ireland for England
1573-1588: Sir Francis Walsingham for England
1573: The Panamanian Silver Train for England
1576-1594: The North-West passage for England
1578-1583: The North-West passage for England
1580: Drake's Circumnavigation for England
1585-1592: First step on the continent for England
1585-1598: The North-West passage for England
1585-1585: Raleigh's First Colonial Effort in North America for England
1586: Drake's Triumphs for England
1587: The Beheading of Mary of Scots for England
1587-1587: Raleigh's Second Colonial Effort in North America for England
1589-1605: Richard Hakluyt for England
1589: The English Armada for England
1592-1599: Hugh O'Neill's Irish Rebellion for England
1593: William Shakespeare for England
1595-1595: Raleigh's Orinoco Expedition for England
1596: Antonio Perez induces attacks on Spain for England
1598-1604: The Canceling of Royal Monopolies for England
1603-1625: The Union of the Crowns for England
1605-1605: The Gunpowder Plot for England
1606-1614: Beginnings of the Virginia Company for England
1607-1611: The North-West passage for England
1607-1624: Formation of Virginia for England
1610-1620: The Colonial Chartered Companies for England
1612-1616: The North-West passage for England
1615-1620: Colonial Defense for England
1615-1640: The Ulster Plantation for England
1617-1620: The invention of logarithms for England
1620-1635: The Puritan Migration to the New World for England
1620-1639: Formation of Maine for England
1620-1639: Formation of Massachussets for England
1620-1640: The Council of New England for England
1620-1665: Native Raids for England
1623-1639: Formation of New Hampshire for England
1623-1623: Buckingham and Prince Charles embarrass the Crown for England
1624-1632: Formation of Maryland for England
1624-1664: Formation of New York for England
1625-1625: Charles I and Henrietta Maria of France for England
1625-1625: The Raid on Cadiz for England
1627-1627: Buckingham Aids the Huguenots for England
1628-1628: The Petition of Rights for England
1630-1700: An Opportunity in India for England
1630-1700: The Indian Scam for England
1630-1670: The great scientists of the 17th century for England
1633-1637: Formation of Connecticut for England
1633-1637: Formation of Vermont for England
1634-1641: The Parliamentary Conflict for England
1640-1660: Formation of North Carolina for England
1642-1642: The English Civil War for England
1643-1645: The Confederation of New England for England
1643: AI_EVENT for The Pope
1648: AI_EVENT for The Pope
1649-1649: The Irish break free for England
1649: The Execution of King Charles for England
1649: King Charles and the New Monarchy for England
1649: The Commonwealth of England for England
1649-1685: The Union of Great Britain for England
1649: The Cromwellian Massacres for England
1650-1655: Puritan Refugees From the English Civil War for England
1651-1651: The Act of Navigation for England
1651: Hobbes publishes 'Leviathan' for England
1652-1674: Raid on the Medway for England
1652-1674: Raid on the Medway for England
1653: The line of battle for England
1653: The Protectorate for England
1654-1680: Cromwell's Western Design for England
1657-1681: Settlement of Jamaica for England
1657: The Coronation for England
1660-1682: Formation of Pennsylvania for England
1660-1687: Conquest of the Far North for England
1660: The Restoration of the Stuarts for England
1660-1675: The Royal Society and Royal Greenwich Observatory for England
1665-1668: Radisson and des Groseilliers Offer their Services to England for England
1665-1665: The Great Plague for England
1666-1670: Colonial Defense for England
1666-1666: The Great Fire of London for England
1670-1680: Indentured Servants Emigrate to British North America for England
1670-1690: Formation of South Carolina for England
1670-1710: Lambert's Act of Union for England
1670-1699: Native Raids for England
1670-1690: Sir Christopher Wren and the Great Rebuilding for England
1670: The Hudson's Bay Company for England
1672-1672: The Decree of Indulgence and the Bill of Test for England
1673-1673: Samuel Pepys at the Admiralty for England
1673: The Duke of York and the Catholic Wedding for England
1675-1700: The Norfolk four-course system for England
1675-1700: The Transportation of Convicts for England
1680-1690: Transported Convicts Arrive in British North America for England
1684-1684: The Abandonment of Tangiers for England
1684-1686: Radisson and des Groseilliers Return to the Hudson Bay Company for England
1684-1686: Radisson returned to the service of the Hudson Bay Company for England
1685: Battle of Sedgemoor for England
1685-1685: Bloody Assizes for England
1687-1688: Newton publishes Principia Mathematica for England
1687-1695: Isaac Newton for England
1688-1702: The Deliverance of Scotland for England
1688: The Absolution for England
1688: The Glorious Revolution and the Bill of Rights for England
1688: The Glorious Revolution and the Bill of Rights for England
1688: The Restoration of the Monarchy for England
1689-1689: John Locke for England
1689-1690: Dominion of New England Revolts for England
1689-1702: Personal union with Holland for England
1690-1695: Henry Purcell for England
1691-1692: The Situation Calms in New England for England
1692-1697: The Creation of Bank of England for England
1700-1705: Colonial Defense for England
1700-1710: Indentured Servants Emigrate to British North America for England
1700-1730: Formation of Georgia for England
1700-1819: The Act of Union for England
1701-1701: The Act of Settlement for England
1701-1701: The Act of Settlement for England
1704-1705: Newton publishes Optica for England
1705-1759: Native Raids for England
1709-1710: Darby and the coke process for England
1712-1769: Newcomen and the steam engine for England
1713: The Peace of Utrecht for England
1714-1714: Hanover and the British throne for England
1714-1714: Finding the longitude at sea for England
1714: Hanover and the British throne for England
1714: Hanover and the British throne for England
1714: Hanover and the British throne for England
1714-1760: My Dear Friends at Home for England
1714-1760: My Dear Friends at Home for England
1714-1760: My Dear Friends at Home for England
1714-1760: My Dear Friends at Home for England
1714-1760: My Dear Friends at Home for England
1714: No Protestant Heir for England
1714: The Hanover Dynasty in England for England
1715-1720: Jacobite Rebellion for England
1720-1730: Transported Convicts Arrive in British North America for England
1720: The South Seas Bubble for England
1721-1722: Sir Robert Walpole for England
1725-1730: Lowland Scots Arrive in British North America for England
1730-1740: Exemptions to the Navigation Act for England
1730-1740: Indentured Servants Emigrate to British North America for England
1737-1740: Captain Jenkins Ear for England
1740-1750: Skilled Migrants Flock to the New World for England
1740-1780: The Evangelical Revival for England
1740-1780: The Evangelical Revival for England
1740-1780: The Evangelical Revival for England
1741-1755: Georg Frideric Haendel for England
1742-1742: The Effects of the Pragmatic Sanction for England
1745-1749: Jacobite Rebellion for England
1746-1819: The Wail of the Pipes for England
1750-1750: David Hume for England
1750-1760: Highland Scots Find Refuge in British North America for England
1750-1760: The East India Company for England
1757-1758: William Pitt the Elder for England
1759-1763: Guinness Brewery Founded in Dublin for England
1760-1765: American Self-assurance Increase for England
1760-1770: Transported Convicts Arrive in British North America for England
1761-1761: The longitude problem has been solved for England
1763-1819: The royal proclamation for England
1765-1766: Tax Revolt in America for England
1765-1775: Skilled Migrants Flock to the New World for England
1765-1780: John Wilkes for England
1770-1771: The American Colonial Policy for England
1770-1819: The first vaccines for England
1771-1819: Direct Governance of Bengal for England
1773-1774: The American Revolution for England
1773-1788: Loyalists to Canada for England
1773-1819: Rebellion in British North America for England
1773-1819: The Destruction of the Tax Revolt for England
1773-1819: The Treaty of Paris for England
1773-1819: The Treaty of Paris for England
1774-1819: James Watt and the industrialization for England
1775-1819: The Olive Branch Petition for England
1776-1776: Adam Smith publishes 'The Wealth of Nations' for England
1776-1819: Hessians return to Europe for England
1781: The discovery of Uranus for England
1782-1788: Grattan's Parliament for England
1783: William Blake for England
1783: William Pitt the Younger for England
1784-1819: The Transportation of Convicts to Australia for England
1785-1790: Colonial dissatisfaction cools for England
1789: The Regency Bill 1789 for England
1790-1791: The North American Union for England
1790-1800: Skilled Migrants Flock to the New World for England
1790: Pitt the Younger or Charles James Fox as Prime Minister for England
1790: Pitt the Younger Continues as Prime Minister for England
1790: War Erupts Between England and France for England
1792-1793: The English Response to French Expansionism for England
1792-1793: The English Response to French Expansionism for England
1792-1794: Reaction to the Reign of Terror for England
1792: English Radicals Support the French Revolution for England
1792: Fox Expresses Support for the English Radicals for England
1793-1796: The Anglo-Corsican Kingdom for England
1794-1800: Taking hold of Corsica for England
1794-1795: Franz Joseph Haydn for England
1794-1794: The Trial of the Leading Radicals for England
1797-1797: The Bank Restriction Act for England
1797: Parliamentary Reform for England
1798-1798: The Raising of the Volunteer Militias for England
1799-1799: Reaction to the Rise of Napoléon for England
1799-1805: The Church Missionary Society for England
1799: Pitt's Taxation Reforms for England
1800: Catholic Emancipation for England
1801-1819: Irish Act of Union for England
1801-1819: United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland for England
1801: Charles Grey for England
1801: Henry Addington for England
1803-1804: The English Response to French Expansionism for England
1803-1804: The English Response to French Expansionism for England
1803-1819: David Ricardo for England
1804: William Pitt the Younger for England
1806: William Wyndham Grenville for England
1807: Duke of Portland for England
1808-1810: A Napoleonic War in Far East for England
1809: Spencer Percival for England
1809: William Wyndham Grenville for England
1810: Charles Grey for England
1811: The Regency Bill 1811 for England
1811-1819: The consequences of the industrialization for England
1812: Earl of Liverpool for England
1813: George Canning for England
Triggered (1814-1819): Cession of Guyana for England
1815-1816: The Corn Laws for England
Triggered (triggered event): A Letter from Duke Francis for England
Triggered (1775-1818): Benares and the Nawab of Oudh for England
Triggered (1798-1801): British influence in Oman for England
Triggered (1711): Charles VI elected Holy Roman Emperor for England
Triggered (1690-1700): Charles le moyne d'Iberville for England
Triggered (1688-1702): Chasing after the Jacobites for England
Triggered (triggered event): Consequence of the victory in Northern America for England
Triggered (triggered event): Consequence of the victory in Northern America for England
Triggered (triggered event): Consequences of the raid on the Medway for England
Triggered (triggered event): Consequences of the raid on the Medway for England
Triggered (1621-1780): East Indian Company Attacks Portuguese Hormouz for England
Triggered (1790): Fox is Prime Minister for England
Triggered (triggered event, 1714): George Will Be Our New King for England
Triggered (triggered event): HMS Phaeton attacked on Nagasaki harbor for England
Triggered (1776-1819): Hessians in America for England
Triggered (1587-1603): James VI and the English throne for England
Triggered (1619-1619): Jan Pieterszoon Coen burnt Jepara for England
Triggered (1776-1783): John Paul Jones for England
Triggered (1542): King Henry's Offer for England
Triggered (1542-1542): King Henry's Offer Consequence for Connaught for England
Triggered (1542-1542): King Henry's Offer Consequence for Desmond for England
Triggered (1542-1542): King Henry's Offer Consequence for Eire for England
Triggered (1542-1542): King Henry's Offer Consequence for Leinster for England
Triggered (1542-1542): King Henry's Offer Consequence for Ulster for England
Triggered (1571-1575): Navarre's proposal for England
Triggered (1462-1466): Northumberland is attacked for England
Triggered (triggered event): Our Offer Was Rejected for England
Triggered (1790): Pitt is Prime Minister for England
Triggered (1809-1819): Restoration of the French Monarchy for England
Triggered (1688-1690): Savoy joins our alliance for England
Triggered (1688-1690): Savoy joins our alliance for England
Triggered (1458-1460): Scottish Refusal for England
Triggered (1760-1763): The Accession of Mir Qasim for England
Triggered (1773-1819): The Continental Congress Fails for England
Triggered (1773-1819): The Continental Congress Succeeds for England
Triggered (1753-1772): The Convention of Westminster for England
Triggered (triggered event): The Corsican alliance for England
Triggered (1663): The Dowry of Ducats from Catherine of Bragança for England
Triggered (1661): The Dowry of Territory from Catherine of Bragança for England
Triggered (triggered event): The Founding of Madras for England
Triggered (1792-1793): The French Revolutionary Wars for England
Triggered (1701, 1701): The Grand Alliance for England
Triggered (1701, 1701): The Grand Alliance for England
Triggered (triggered event, 1714): The Hanover Dynasty in England for England
Triggered (1715-1720): The Jacobites recover their Kingdom for England
Triggered (1745-1749): The Jacobites recover their Kingdom for England
Triggered (1802): The Knights Stand at Malta for England
Triggered (1676-1681): The League of Augsburg for England
Triggered (1703): The Methuen Agreement for England
Triggered (1803-1804): The Napoleonic Wars for England
Triggered (triggered event, 1714): The Return of the Stuarts for England
Triggered (1799): The Rise of Napoléon for England
Triggered (1423-1423): The Scots Reject James's Release for England
Triggered (triggered event): The Spider and The Boar for England
Triggered (1661, 1663): The Spurning of Charles II for England
Triggered (1649-1685): The Union of Great Britain for England
Triggered (1603-1625): The Union of the Crowns for England
Triggered (1518-1519): The candidate to the imperial crown for England
Triggered (1649-1685): The formation of Great Britain for England
Triggered (1745-1749): The last Jacobite threat for England
Triggered (1745-1749): The last Jacobite threat for England
Triggered (1603-1625): The plan for a united Britain for England
Triggered (triggered event): The second treaty of San Ildefonso for England
Triggered (triggered event): Then who shall defend you now? for England
Triggered (1693-1750): Trade in Calcutta for England
Triggered (1693-1750): Trade in Calcutta for England
Triggered (triggered event): Treaty of Picquigny for England
Triggered (triggered event): Treaty of Picquigny for England
Triggered (1765-1819): Vassalization of Bengal for England
Triggered (1750-1819): Victory in Northern America for England
Triggered (1447-1449): York, Lieutenant of Ireland for England
Random: A French Noble Rebels Against English Rule for England
Random: A French Noble Rebels Against English Rule for England
Random: A French Noble Rebels Against English Rule for England
Random: A French Noble Rebels Against English Rule for England
Random: A French Pretender Launches a Rebellion for England
Random: A Pirate Offers His Services for England
Random: An English Noble Has Been Captured by French Bandits for England
Random: French Levies Desert for England
Random: French Levies Desert for England
Random: War Causes Dissent Amongst the French for England
Random: War Causes Dissent Amongst the French for England

England — Not random

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1419
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1425)

Description

Lollards were a heretical group following the theological teaching of John Wyclif. Popular protests against the wealth, power, and pride of the clergy, were frequent, and in times of disorder would express themselves in an extreme form. They had been persecuted several times during the 14th century, and its last appearance was in the early 15th century.

Actions

A. Stop the Heretics

  • Global revolt risk +3 for 36 months
  • Stability -2
  • -50 gold

B. Let them be

  • -100 relations with Papal States
  • -100 relations with France
  • -100 relations with Burgundy
  • -100 relations with Brittany
  • -100 relations with Dauphiné

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1419
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1430)
unless prevented by
Action A of 164180 - English Final Victory for England

Description

The counties of Maine and then Anjou fell into the hands of the English. Despite incredible gains in Maine, a small but significant portion of Anjou remained in the hands of Dauphinists. From their strategic position on the north and south banks of the Loire, the French rebels would harass the English lines of supply and communication, undermining England's rule and the stability of the region.

Actions

A. Keep an eye on the rabble then...

  • Maine revolts
  • -50 relations with Provence
  • -50 relations with Dauphiné
  • -25 relations with Brittany
  • Revolt risk value in Maine +4
  • -2 base tax value in Maine
  • Revolt risk value in Ile de France -2

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 60 days of October 2, 1422
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1422)

Description

When King Henry V departed for his last campaign in France, he had appointed his youngest brother, Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, as Regent during his absence. Whilst Henry lived, the appointment was acceptable to all because Gloucester was firmly under the control of his eldest brother and could be called to order if the necessity arose. He was an intelligent man, and in the last months of King Henry V's reign, Gloucester discharged his office dutifully and conscientiously. He was a prominent heroe of Agincourt and had been severely wounded in that epic battle, which had ensured his immense popularity with the commons. Added to this he was affable, approachable, and a noted patron of letters and learning. He favoured war until the French were truly subjugated, a view commonly held by the people who felt that they deserved nothing less. Gloucester's troubles arose from his dealings with the magnates whose responsibilities enabled them to play a hand in England's government. They found him quarrelsome and difficult and so they disliked and distrusted him. Chief among those who held this view were the two remaining Beaufort brothers, Henry, Bishop of Winchester, and Thomas, Duke of Exeter, the infant King's guardian. Henry V had done what he could before his death to arrange for his son's rule. In his will, Henry V had designated Henry's brother John, Duke of Bedford, to prosecute war in France, while England was to be ruled by Gloucester. However, there was no constitutional precedent, and while Gloucester viewed his brother's dying wishes as his right, in actuality, it was the Lords of the Council who were to determine Gloucester's place in government. Led by Henry Beaufort, the Council resisted Gloucester's wishes and refused to invest a Regency in him. Instead, Gloucester was created 'Protector of the Realm of England' and King's Chief Councillor, sinking to the role of Second Councillor whenever his older brother, John, was present in England. So, the council secured their rule despite Henry V's wishes and Gloucester's actions. Nevertheless, Parliament could reverse this development and met late in the year. Gloucester then pressed his cause before the Lords to be recognised as Regent of England, basing his claim on his blood relationship to the new King, and the dying wishes of his brother. The Lords, suitably prepared by the two Beaufort brothers and other members of the Council, flatly refused Gloucester's request. Thus, parliament backed the Council's wishes and his reduced position was confirmed. Gloucester was deeply insulted by Beaufort's efforts, and would never truly forgive him. Meanwhile the nominal rule of a baby invited discord and frustrated war efforts. Sacrifice and unity were demanded at home, yet they depended heavily on the success of the war...

Actions

A. By His Majesty's will, Bedford shall rule the kingdom

B. Invest the powers of Kingship in Gloucester

C. Let the old man Beaufort have his day

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 60 days of October 2, 1422
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1422)

Description

When King Henry V departed for his last campaign in France, he had appointed his youngest brother, Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, as Regent during his absence. Whilst Henry lived, the appointment was acceptable to all because Gloucester was firmly under the Royal Power of his eldest brother and could be called to order if the necessity arose. He was an intelligent man, and in the last months of King Henry V's reign, Gloucester discharged his office dutifully and conscientiously. He was one of the most prominent of the heroes of Agincourt and had been severely wounded in that epic battle, which ensured his immense popularity with the common people. Added to this he was affable, approachable, and a noted patron of letters and learning. He favoured the continuation of the war until the French were truly subjugated, a view commonly held by the people who felt that they deserved nothing less. Gloucester's troubles arose from his dealings with the magnates whose responsibilities enabled them to play a hand in England's government. They found him quarrelsome and difficult and so they disliked and distrusted him. Chief among those who held this view were the two remaining Beaufort brothers, Henry, Bishop of Winchester, and Thomas, Duke of Exeter, the infant King's guardian. Henry V had done what he could before his death to arrange for his son's rule. By his will Henry's brother John, Duke of Bedford was to head the Regency in England. However, there was no constitutional precedent, and Gloucester coveted the position for himself. Nevertheless, it was the Lords of the Council who would determine the arrangement of government. Led by Henry Beaufort, the Council resisted Gloucester's wishes, and refused to invest a Regency in him. Instead, Gloucester was created 'Protector of the Realm of England', which gave him the position as King's Chief Councillor. So the council secured their rule despite Gloucester's actions. Nevertheless, Parliament could reverse the development, and was to meet late in the year. The Lords, suitably prepared by the two Beaufort brothers and other members of the Council, flatly refused Gloucester's request. Thus Parliament backed the Council's wishes and his reduced position was confirmed. Gloucester was insulted by Beaufort's efforts, and would find it difficult to forgive him. Neverthless, his older and more capable brother, John, Duke of Bedford was adept at keeping his younger fiery brother in line, at least for the time being.

Actions

A. Bedford shall watch over the realm

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 60 days of November 2, 1422
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1425)
unless prevented by
Action B, C of 164218 - Henry VI's Minority for England
Action A of 164219 - Henry VI's Minority for England

Description

William, Count of Holland and Hainault died in 1417, leaving one daughter, Jacqueline. Jacqueline had been married to the late Dauphin of France, who had died only a few weeks before her father. At the time, King Henry V had made overtures for the lady's hand for his brother John, Duke of Bedford, but her mother, the sister of the late Duke of Burgundy, John 'the Fearless', saw to it that the young widow married John, Duke of Brabant. John was Philip's nephew and his father had been killed by the English at Agincourt. The marriage may well have been void on the grounds of consanguinity, because John and Jacqueline were cousins, but its political justification lay in keeping Hainault within Burgundy's control. John 'the Fearless', and his son and successor, Philip 'the Good', had understood this all too well. Jacqueline had been passed over for the succession to the counties on her father's death in 1417 in favor of her uncle, John of Bavaria. However, the Duke of Brabant had simply ceded much of Jacqueline's inheritance to the Duke of Bavaria in order to settle the dispute. A diplomatic move that had not been received well by Jacqueline. Furious over her dull husband's inability to secure the inheritance, Jacqueline had left him. In 1421, she fled to London, where she met Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester. Within two years, they announced their intention of getting married. The two needed a Papal dispensation for the marriage, which Pope Martin V would not supply. Thus, Gloucester approached the recently displaced Pope Benedict XIII, who was happy to spite Pope Martin by granting the annulment. Their marriage entitled Gloucester to the counties of Holland, Zeeland and Hainult, albeit at a cost. The Courts of Europe were scandalised by what they had done. Philip was incandescent with rage and made it clear that he had suffered a grave affront which he felt most deeply. Believing, with good reason, that Jacqueline's inheritance of Hainault would never be surrendered to her peacefully, Gloucester saw seizure by force as the only alternative. The Council was finding it difficult to keep Gloucester in order, and it may well be that his enterprise was aimed at defying the wishes of the Council which had spurned him under the leadership of Bishop Beaufort. Nevertheless, they warned him that any such a venture into Hainault would be seen as a hostile act against Burgundy herself.

Actions

A. Renounce any claims to the inheritance and denounce Gloucester's private efforts

B. The inheritance is rightfully ours!

C. Force Gloucester to withdraw his claims and appease Jacqueline with estates in England

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 60 days of November 2, 1422
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1425)
unless prevented by
Action A of 164218 - Henry VI's Minority for England

Description

William, Count of Holland and Hainault died in 1417, leaving one daughter, Jacqueline. Jacqueline had been married to the late Dauphin of France, who had died only a few weeks before her father. At the time, King Henry V had made overtures for the lady's hand for his brother John, Duke of Bedford, but her mother, the sister of the late Duke of Burgundy, John 'the Fearless', saw to it that the young widow married John, Duke of Brabant. John was Philip's nephew and his father had been killed by the English at Agincourt. This marriage may well have been void on the grounds of consanguinity, because John and Jacqueline were cousins, but its political justification lay in keeping Hainault within Burgundy's control. John 'the Fearless', and his son and successor, Philip 'the Good', had understood this all too well. Jacqueline had been passed over for the succession to the counties on her father's death in 1417 in favor of her uncle, John of Bavaria. However, the Duke of Brabant had simply ceded much of Jacqueline's inheritance to the Duke of Bavaria in order to settle the dispute. A diplomatic move that had not been received well by Jacqueline. Furious over her dull husband's inability to secure the inheritance, Jacqueline had left him. In 1421, she fled to London, where she met Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester. Gloucester was well aware of the consequences of associating England with a family feud well within Burgundian jurisdiction. A marriage between Gloucester and Jacqueline would entitle him to the Counties of Holland, Zeeland and Hainault. Gloucester would require a special Papal dispensation, which the current Pope, Martin V, would likely decline to provide. However, a dispensation from the displaced Pope Benedict XIII was well within reach. If Gloucester were to act on impulse, Burgundy would be incandescent with rage and the Courts of Europe would scandalised by what had occurred. Nevertheless, there was more than enough reason to believe that the inheritance would never be surrendered to Jacqueline peacefully, and expanding England's foothold in the lowlands was a terribly tempting prospect.

Actions

A. Reject Jacqueline's overtures for marriage, but privately fund her efforts

B. These lands are rightfully ours!

C. Withdraw the claims altogether and appease Jacqueline with estates in England

England — Not random

Conditions

  • None of the following must occur:
    • England and Burgundy are at war
    • England and Brandenburg are at war
    • England and Luxemburg are at war
  • Own Holland
  • Own Artois
  • At least one of the following must occur:

Will happen within 1 days of January 2, 1424
Checked again every 1 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after July 3, 1428)
unless prevented by
Action A, C of 164220 - Jacqueline of Hainault for England
Action A, C of 164221 - Jacqueline of Hainault for England

Description

Jacqueline, with the aid of her valiant husband, Gloucester, arrived in London to the cheers and rapturious acclaim of the poeple of London and Henry VI's loyal subjects from the surrounding country side. England had defied the greed of the Dukes of Burgundy, Brabant and Luxemburg, and solidified a foothold in the rich lowland countries and was now celebrating with all the pomp and style of the times. The Duke and his Countess had returned with the Treaty of Amsterdam, which secured for the Countess her father's inheritance of the counties of Hainault and Holland. Gloucester would spend a short time attending to matters of council, and his own estates in England, before returning to the continent to help administrate England's new possessions. Well done sire!

Actions

A. OK

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 30 days of February 2, 1424
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1424)
unless prevented by
Action B of 20435 - The General Council, 1423 for Scotland

Description

The position James held under Henry V encouraged the council to regard James as a potential ally. The prospect of a marriage between James and an English royal had The senior Beaufort's, Thomas, Duke of Exeter, and Henry, Bishop of Winchester, were not only half-brothers of Henry IV but held dominant positions on the household and council in 1423. Hence, in the Beaufort's actively sought to solidify a marriage between James and their neice Joan Beaufort. Their efforts were successful and in February of 1424 James and Joan celebrated their marriage at Southwark with a banquet in the bishop's diocese.

Actions

A. Excellent!

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 30 days of February 2, 1424
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1424)

Description

James I's Coronation occurred at Scone and was a display of restored royal prestige. James was installed on the throne by his old tutor, Bishop Wardlaw of St. Andrews, and Murdac I Duke of Albany as Earl of Fife, in accordance with customary procedure. After the ceremony, James conferred knighthood on Duke Murdac's favoured son, Alexander, and several of James's nobles, including the Earls of Wigtown, March, and Angus, his southern allies. This display of renewed monarchy and feudal harmony encouraged English hopes for James. With James on the throne, Henry VI's Regency could feel secure in knowing that England's northern border was safe from significant Scottish invasion for at least the next few years...

Actions

A. Excellent!

  • Stability +1
  • +25 gold
  • Gain Scotland as vassals

Province of Artois — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1425
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1427)
unless prevented by
Action B of 164222 - Jacqueline is Captured for England
Action B, C of 164220 - Jacqueline of Hainault for England
Action B, C of 164221 - Jacqueline of Hainault for England

Description

Jacqueline, Countess of Hainault, Zeeland and Holland, the rebel who sought her father's inheritance and repudiated her marriage to John Duke of Brabant, had been held captive. She had been struggling for control of her father's inheritance since his death in 1417. Having failed in her attempt at revolt, the Duke of Gloucester had financed an attempt to rescue her. Having caught wind of Gloucester's plan, Jacqueline's supporters revolted, and as a result she mounted a successful escape from Burgundian captivity.

Actions

A. Find her!

  • -15 relations with England
  • Artois revolts
  • Artois revolts

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 150 days of March 2, 1425
Checked again every 150 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1426)
unless prevented by
Action B, C of 164220 - Jacqueline of Hainault for England
Action B, C of 164221 - Jacqueline of Hainault for England

Description

Jacqueline's revolts in the low countries were crushed. The rebels had bungled their efforts and Gloucester's efforts served only to humiliate him. Gloucester abandoned her in disgrace. Jacqueline was soon afterwards imprisoned at Ghent, and Gloucester responded with an attempt to free her. If Jacqueline remained a captive, she would soon be obliged to make peace with Duke Philip of Burgundy, who sought to avenge her repudiation of his cousin, John IV Duke of Brabant.

Actions

A. Attempt a Rescue Effort!

  • Lose 5000 troops in a random province
  • -15 gold
  • -25 relations with Burgundy
  • -25 relations with Brabant
  • -25 relations with Luxemburg

B. Oh, well...

  • +15 relations with Burgundy
  • +15 relations with Brabant
  • +15 relations with Luxemburg
  • Event 164223 - Jacqueline's Escape for Artois will never fire

England — Not random

Will happen within 30 days of November 2, 1425
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1425)
unless prevented by
Action B, C of 164218 - Henry VI's Minority for England

Description

By the end of 1425, Gloucester was stirring up more trouble in England. Although he was the titular Protector of the Realm of England, and the King's Chief Councilor, the Council, led by his uncle, Henry Beaufort, quarreled with him daily over domestic and foreign policy. Beaufort, bishop of Winchester, had been offered a Cardinal's hat during Henry V's reign, though the King had refused to allow Beaufort to accept, requiring the Bishop's services during those critical years. He was in high favour during Henry V's and Henry IV's reigns, serving as Chancellor on more than one occasion. Gloucester remained a staunch supporter of the war in France, but more importantly, had harboured ill feelings towards his uncle for excluding him from assuming control of King Henry VI's Regency after Henry V's death. Although Beaufort held a majority of support among the councillors in England, Gloucester's popularity in the Commons tended to balance the two court parties. In several instanes, the two had come to bitter words, heated exchanges and blows. On this occasion, however, Beaufort felt his life was in danger. Gloucester had already incited several mobs protesting Beaufort's actions, and was now threatening to forecfully remove Beaufort himself. The bishop frantically wrote to the Duke of Bedford, begging him to return to the Council in order to straighten out the valiant Duke's irate younger brother. Thus Bedford was obliged to return to England, in order to soothe the two parties. He remained there, personally administrating England until the two parties had been somewhat reconsiled the situation had stabilized, temporarily abandoning his personal war efforts in France.

Actions

A. Gloucester's enraged, sire!

  • Stability -1
  • Global revolt risk +1 for 12 months
  • Leader Bedford becomes active
  • Leader Bedford will never be active

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 15 days of July 2, 1428
Checked again every 15 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 30, 1436)
unless prevented by
Action B, C of 164220 - Jacqueline of Hainault for England
Action B, C of 164221 - Jacqueline of Hainault for England

Description

Without sufficient military presence, Gloucester's attempt to reclaim Jacqueline's inheritance could not succeed. With mounting pressure from the English Council and the Duke of Burgundy, Gloucester was forced to withdraw his forces. Facing humilation at home and a strong desire to distance himself from the whole debacle, Gloucester rejected Jacqueline in favour of one her servants, Eleanor Cobham, who stayed in England. A papal decree invalidated Gloucester's marriage to Jacqueline, permitting him to marry Eleanor, for which he was severely criticized. Jacqueline remained on the continent and fell into the hands of the Duke of Burgundy...

Actions

A. Oh, well...

  • -25 relations with Burgundy

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 15 days of July 2, 1428
Checked again every 15 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 30, 1436)
unless prevented by
Action A, C of 164220 - Jacqueline of Hainault for England
Action A, C of 164221 - Jacqueline of Hainault for England

Description

Without sufficient military presence, Gloucester's attempt to reclaim Jacqueline's inheritance could not succeed. With mounting pressure from the English Council and the Duke of Burgundy, Gloucester was forced to withdraw his forces. Facing humilation at home and a strong desire to distance himself from the whole debacle, Gloucester rejected Jacqueline in favour of one her servants, Eleanor Cobham, who stayed in England. A papal decree invalidated Gloucester's marriage to Jacqueline, permitting him to marry Eleanor, for which he was severely criticized. Jacqueline remained on the continent and fell into the hands of the Duke of Burgundy...

Actions

A. Oh, well...

  • Stability -1
  • Holland will no longer be considered a national province
  • Artois will no longer be considered a national province
  • -25 relations with Burgundy
  • -50 victory points
  • Clear flag "[HollandClaim]"
  • Event 164161 - Failure in the Low Countries for England will never fire

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 200 days of January 2, 1429
Checked again every 200 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1430)

Description

Besides the subsidies granted to the Crown by the estates there was a gabelle, a quatrieme on wine and cider, and a sales tax on all goods. In addition the guet was levied, a hearth tax to pay the troops. The peasants in Normandy suffered fromt he English garrisons -- foraging, looting and kidnapping for ransom, and the patis. By now, the plundering grew still more oppressive. The English freebooters and ecorcheurs laid waste to peasant life across the Norman lands. Lancastrian France was becoming a wilderness laid waste by its garrisons, by deserters, by erocheurs and by Dauphinist raiders. At the end of the 1420s, the revenues from Normandy began to fall drastically, with vast swathes of fertile and arable lands now barren and deserted. A series of bad harvests only exacerbated the crisis, fuelling a bread shortage and adding to the peasants' misery. It would not be long before a series of revolts would break out across the vast Duchy territory...

Actions

A. Is there nothing we can do?!

  • -2 base tax value in Caux
  • -2 base tax value in Normandie
  • Revolt risk value in Caux +4
  • Revolt risk value in Normandie +4

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 200 days of January 2, 1430
Checked again every 200 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1431)
unless prevented by
Action B of 164182 - The push for Guyenne for England
Action A, C of 164181 - The Loire Valley Offensive for England

Description

Having abandoned Salisbury's campaign plans for the Loire Valley three years before, the Regency instead focused on smashing the remnants of the Dauphinists forces in the two counties, particularly those stationed at Angers. After a vicious campaign and numerous sieges, the Dauphinist forces abandoned the lands north of the Loire. At last, a semblance of stability prevailed throughout the Duchy.

Actions

A. Good!

  • Revolt risk value in Maine -4
  • +1 base tax value in Maine

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 1 days of December 3, 1431
Checked again every 1 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1432)

Description

As a result of interrupted communications and exposed supply routes, together with harassment by brigands and peasants, many Parisians were starving. Bedford had returned to Paris early in 1431 amidst widespread famine. He had brought with him some seventy barges laden with food which provided merely a temporary respite from the daily misery of the people. The price of wheat had doubled and many now cursed the Regent, not only in private but in public as well. Charles had been anointed at Rheims not too long before, and Cardinal Beaufort had been desperate to counter the development. Henry VI arrived in Paris and was to spend little time there. Cardinal Beaufort presided over an ill-managed ceremony that was conducted tactlessly. The Bishop of Paris was snubbed, as were several traditionally French nuances in favour of their English counterparts. The day degenerated into a riot.

Actions

A. Cardinal Beaufort is the King's favourite...

  • Revolt risk value in Ile de France +2
  • -2 base tax value in Ile de France

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Picardie
    • Own Caux
    • Own Ile de France
    • Own Nivernais
    • Own Dauphiné
    • Own Lyonnais
    • Own Bourgogne
    • Own Berri
    • Own Orléanais
    • Own Maine
    • Own Normandie
    • Own Vendée
    • Own Poitou
    • Own Limousin
    • Own Auvergne
    • Own Cévennes
    • Own Languedoc
    • Own Guyenne
    • Own Gascogne

Will happen within 10 days of September 15, 1435
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1435)

Description

On September 14th, 1435, John of Lancaster Duke of Bedford and Regent of France, younger brother of the great Henry V, drew his last breath. The loss of such an able commander and administrator was a severe blow to England's grip on France. Within weeks of Bedford's departure, areas of English occupied France revolted in a desperate attempt to shake off the English, whose presence in France had begun to seem like occupation. Compounding England's problems were severe grain shortages accross much of France. The English were forced to respond to the shortages by banning the export of grain in order to secure enough food for the soldiers. Bedford's death also signaled the gradual but steady demise of the King's Council and domestic stability, as constant jockeying for Royal favour within the factionalized English Court eclipsed issues of great importance and necessity. Without his older brother Bedford to keep him somewhat pacified, Gloucester, now heir presumptive, unleashed himself on Cardinal Beaufort. Their rivalry and continued squabling represented a source of constant conflict that spilled over into foreign and domestic matters. The events of the autumn of 1435 prompted the boy King, Henry VI, now nearing fourteen years of age, to voice his own views and take a greater interest in the emotionally charged political circumstances of the day. One thing was certain, England was simply ill equipped for, and slow to adapt to Bedford's departure.

Actions

A. Our subjects in France are in arms!

  • Stability -1
  • Monarch's administrative skill -2 for 13 months
  • Monarch's diplomatic skill -2 for 13 months
  • Monarch's military skill -2 for 13 months
  • Caux revolts
  • Normandie revolts
  • Revolt risk value in Picardie +12
  • Revolt risk value in Caux +12
  • Revolt risk value in Ile de France +12
  • Revolt risk value in Nivernais +12
  • Revolt risk value in Dauphiné +12
  • Revolt risk value in Lyonnais +12
  • Revolt risk value in Bourgogne +12
  • Revolt risk value in Berri +12
  • Revolt risk value in Orléanais +12
  • Revolt risk value in Maine +12
  • Revolt risk value in Normandie +12
  • Revolt risk value in Armor +12
  • Revolt risk value in Bretagne +12
  • Revolt risk value in Morbihan +12
  • Revolt risk value in Vendée +12
  • Revolt risk value in Poitou +12
  • Revolt risk value in Limousin +12
  • Revolt risk value in Auvergne +12
  • Revolt risk value in Cévennes +12
  • Revolt risk value in Languedoc +12
  • Revolt risk value in Guyenne +12
  • Revolt risk value in Gascogne +12

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Picardie
    • Own Caux
    • Own Ile de France
    • Own Nivernais
    • Own Dauphiné
    • Own Lyonnais
    • Own Bourgogne
    • Own Berri
    • Own Maine
    • Own Normandie
    • Own Vendée
    • Own Poitou
    • Own Limousin
    • Own Auvergne
    • Own Cévennes
    • Own Languedoc
    • Own Guyenne
    • Own Gascogne

Will happen within 90 days of February 2, 1436
Checked again every 90 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1436)

Description

The Duke of York was the son of Richard Earl of Cambridge and Anne Mortimer who had perished within days of York's birth. Richard had inherited his title from his paternal grandfather Edmund of Langely, the fourth surviving son of the great Edward III. Cambridge had been executed for treason by King Henry V on the eve of Henry's initial expedition to France in 1415, leaving York an orphan at the age of four. York's paternal uncle Edward, then Duke of York, was killed at Agincourt shortly thereafter, leading the English vanguard against the French cavalry in the opening phases of that epic battle. Perhaps it was Edward's loyalty and courageous actions at Agincourt that saved his nephew from an early political demise, but certainly by enfeofing his estates to trusted lords and supporters, Edward had helped to secure his young nephew's eventual recovery of the lands of York. Through his mother Anne, York would eventually inherit the vast Mortimer estates. Moreover, Anne descended directly from Lionel of Antwerp, the second surviving son of Edward III. Thus, York had an excellent claim on the throne of England, an arguably better claim than Henry's and the wealth to back such a claim if need be, as York was the richest and greatest magnate in England. Despite the questionable actions of his ancestors and his quiet claim, he had served as Henry VI's constable and had further proved himself a loyal subject of Henry's. In the months following Bedford's death, Gloucester's Court faction grew increasingly critical of Cardinal Beaufort's dominance over Henry VI. In the meantime, greater problems had emerged in France. The Council eventually decided York was the best candidate for Bedford's replacement. However, the length of York's term was indefinate, as the King would come of age soon enough and would be expected to make his own appointments. York was charged with the difficult task of providing good governance to lands wrought with strife and seathing with unrest. In this task he was largely successful, surrounded as he was by experienced administrators such as Louis of Luxemburg and seasoned soldiers like Lord Talbot...

Actions

A. With great vigour, our lords have restored much order in France

  • +50 gold
  • Stability +1
  • +7500 infantry in a random province
  • +2000 cavalry in the same province
  • Revolt risk value in Picardie -10
  • Revolt risk value in Caux -10
  • Revolt risk value in Ile de France -10
  • Revolt risk value in Nivernais -10
  • Revolt risk value in Dauphiné -10
  • Revolt risk value in Lyonnais -10
  • Revolt risk value in Bourgogne -10
  • Revolt risk value in Berri -10
  • Revolt risk value in Orléanais -10
  • Revolt risk value in Maine -10
  • Revolt risk value in Normandie -10
  • Revolt risk value in Armor -10
  • Revolt risk value in Bretagne -10
  • Revolt risk value in Morbihan -10
  • Revolt risk value in Vendée -10
  • Revolt risk value in Poitou -10
  • Revolt risk value in Limousin -10
  • Revolt risk value in Auvergne -10
  • Revolt risk value in Cévennes -10
  • Revolt risk value in Languedoc -10
  • Revolt risk value in Guyenne -10
  • Revolt risk value in Gascogne -10

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Holland is a national (core) province
    • Artois is a national (core) province
  • The following must not occur:
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Own Holland
      • Own Artois
  • The following must not occur:

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1437
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 31, 1819)
unless prevented by
Action A of 164225 - Failure in the Low Countries for England
Action A, C of 164220 - Jacqueline of Hainault for England
Action A, C of 164221 - Jacqueline of Hainault for England

Description

Without sufficient military presence, Jacqueline's inheritance is lost forever...

Actions

A. Oh, well...

  • Holland will no longer be considered a national province
  • Artois will no longer be considered a national province
  • -50 victory points
  • Clear flag "[HollandClaim]"

England — Not random

Will happen within 10 days of November 13, 1437
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1437)
unless prevented by
Action B, C of 164218 - Henry VI's Minority for England

Description

Henry VI declared his minority at an end and assumed direct control of the English realm in 1437. He was only sixteen years old. With this declaration the Council reverted to its traditional role of advising the King. The power of the Councillors had increased immensely with 15 years of autonomy, however no one would challenge Henry VI's right to rule in his own name. Once he established himself, Henry VI reappointed all of the Councillors to their former positions, provided they swore not to settle significant matters of state without consulting the King first. A stoutly devout man, Henry VI would prove himself ill-equipped for Kingship, incapable of employing the necessarily ruthless political measures required of the late medieval King. He knew not how to successfully consolidate his Royal power, and instead focused on playing one loyal subject off another loyal subject, fostering jealousies between Councillors and nobles, and lavishly rewarding those close to him with the Royal patrimony.

Actions

A. May ye Lordship be Devout and Mercifull

  • Stability +1
  • Centralization +1
  • Aristocracy +1

England — Not random

Will happen within 10 days of November 13, 1437
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1437)
unless prevented by
Action A of 164218 - Henry VI's Minority for England
Action A of 164219 - Henry VI's Minority for England

Description

Henry VI declared his minority at an end and assumed direct control of the English realm. He was only sixteen years old. With this declaration, Gloucester's Regency in England ended. Gloucester and the Council would revert to their traditional role of advising the youthful and impressionable King. Though Gloucester's power and his Councillors had increased immensely with 15 years of autonomy, none would challenge Henry VI's right to rule in his own name. Once he established himself, Henry VI reappointed all of the Councillors to their former positions, provided they swore not to settle significant matters of state without consulting the King first. A stoutly devout man, Henry VI would prove himself ill-equipped for Kingship, incapable of employing the necessarily ruthless political measures required of the late medieval King. He knew not how to successfully consolidate his Royal power, and instead focused on playing one loyal subject off another loyal subject, fostering jealousies between Councillors and nobles, and lavishly rewarding those close to him with the Royal patrimony.

Actions

A. May ye Lordship be Devout and Mercifull

  • Stability +1
  • Aristocracy -1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Picardie
    • Own Caux
    • Own Ile de France
    • Own Nivernais
    • Own Dauphiné
    • Own Lyonnais
    • Own Bourgogne
    • Own Berri
    • Own Maine
    • Own Normandie
    • Own Vendée
    • Own Poitou
    • Own Limousin
    • Own Auvergne
    • Own Cévennes
    • Own Languedoc
    • Own Guyenne
    • Own Gascogne

Will happen on April 30, 1439

Description

Having proved himself a great warrior fighting against the Welsh Prince Owen Glendower during the first few turbulent years of Henry IV's reign, Warwick had left his country to make a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, later travelling throughout much of eastern Europe before returning to England. He had served in the retinue of the future King Henry V, and again during Henry's great campaigns in France. After Henry V's death, the council had charged Warwick with the task of educating the infant King Henry VI. With the Duke of York requesting to be relieved of duty in the late spring of 1437, Henry VI had appointed Warwick to York's position in France. Warwick remained in France for the final two years of his life. Though a brilliant leader, Warwick was well past his prime at the time of his death. Nevertheless, his death precipitated another crisis throughout a countryside which required strong and permanent leadership for stability. Henry VI and his council would have to look towards a more vigorous candidate for a position many of those in the Council coveted for themselves...

Actions

A. Alas great Warwick, may thee rest in gracious peace...

  • Stability -1
  • Revolt risk value in Picardie +6
  • Revolt risk value in Caux +6
  • Revolt risk value in Ile de France +6
  • Revolt risk value in Nivernais +6
  • Revolt risk value in Dauphiné +6
  • Revolt risk value in Lyonnais +6
  • Revolt risk value in Bourgogne +6
  • Revolt risk value in Berri +6
  • Revolt risk value in Orléanais +6
  • Revolt risk value in Maine +6
  • Revolt risk value in Normandie +6
  • Revolt risk value in Armor +6
  • Revolt risk value in Bretagne +6
  • Revolt risk value in Morbihan +6
  • Revolt risk value in Vendée +6
  • Revolt risk value in Poitou +6
  • Revolt risk value in Limousin +6
  • Revolt risk value in Auvergne +6
  • Revolt risk value in Cévennes +6
  • Revolt risk value in Languedoc +6
  • Revolt risk value in Guyenne +6
  • Revolt risk value in Gascogne +6

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Picardie
    • Own Caux
    • Own Ile de France
    • Own Nivernais
    • Own Dauphiné
    • Own Lyonnais
    • Own Bourgogne
    • Own Berri
    • Own Maine
    • Own Normandie
    • Own Vendée
    • Own Poitou
    • Own Limousin
    • Own Auvergne
    • Own Cévennes
    • Own Languedoc
    • Own Guyenne
    • Own Gascogne

Will happen within 90 days of January 2, 1440
Checked again every 90 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after October 30, 1445)

Description

Frustrated with a lack of proper funding and the constant sense of bickering and deadlock within the King's Council, Richard, Duke of York had requested he be relieved of duty in France late in the Spring of 1437. York had been replaced with Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, a brilliant military commander though already an aged man. It could hardly have been unexpected when, less than two years later, Warwick passed away. His successor had to be sensitive to the conflicting political views held by Gloucester and Cardinal Beaufort's faction in the King's Council. Furthermore, the new lieutenant needed to be of sufficient social status, and of the modest number of possible candidates York was the most promising. The Duke of Gloucester was anxious to secure the post, but the Beauforts and their aspiring affinity successfully resisted his efforts. York had experience, landed resources from which to raise fresh troops, and had shown himself willing to listen to advice. Thus he was once more driven into England's entanglements in France, and named Lieutenant-General of France. The terms of his appointment were similar to his predecessors. He was given the authority to make personal appointments to all offices, including those of constable and chancellor, and to all benefices in France. He could dispose of all lands which might come to the Crown either for life or in tail male, and reserved the right to appoint captains to castles where absentee custodians had failed to make provision. He was granted control over French revenues. During his first term, York had been quick to earn the loyalty and respect of many of Bedford's former supporters in France, and used this appointment to consolidate his power. During his five year term he would manage to stabilize the countryside, despite the decision to reduce the French presence in his large council from a majority to a minority of just two. The mood was such that the French could no longer be trusted. Order would have to be restored from the top down. On the other hand, the move was symptomatic of a pressing issue...the English presence in France was not being viewed as one of liberation or rightful rulership, but of brutal occupation. There were, however, alterior motives behind the appointment as members of the Cardinal's Court faction spread inflated fears that Gloucester and York had allied against the King. With York in France, Gloucester could be isolated and neutralized, and events could soon transpire to tip the balance of Royal sway further in the Beauforts' favour.

Actions

A. York has restored much order in France...

  • Stability +1
  • +50 gold
  • +7000 infantry in a random province
  • +3000 cavalry in the same province
  • Centralization +1
  • Leader York becomes active
  • Revolt risk value in Picardie -8
  • Revolt risk value in Caux -8
  • Revolt risk value in Ile de France -8
  • Revolt risk value in Nivernais -8
  • Revolt risk value in Dauphiné -8
  • Revolt risk value in Lyonnais -8
  • Revolt risk value in Bourgogne -8
  • Revolt risk value in Berri -8
  • Revolt risk value in Orléanais -8
  • Revolt risk value in Maine -8
  • Revolt risk value in Normandie -8
  • Revolt risk value in Armor -8
  • Revolt risk value in Bretagne -8
  • Revolt risk value in Morbihan -8
  • Revolt risk value in Vendée -8
  • Revolt risk value in Poitou -8
  • Revolt risk value in Limousin -8
  • Revolt risk value in Auvergne -8
  • Revolt risk value in Cévennes -8
  • Revolt risk value in Languedoc -8
  • Revolt risk value in Guyenne -8
  • Revolt risk value in Gascogne -8

England — Not random

Will happen on October 22, 1441

Description

The trial of Eleanor Cobham, Humphrey Duke of Gloucester's wife, was primarily the result of Henry VI's suspicion and fear of his uncle. Gloucester, though aged, was an overbearing presence at Court, and as the heir apparent, his opinions could scarcely have been ignored by either the King or his Councillors. Yet through his constant attacks on the Cardinal Beaufort and his nephews, Gloucester had shown himself to be a political enemy of those whom Henry, more often than not, was looking to for support of his aims. To the Beaufort family, the thought of Gloucester succeeding Henry VI was not an alluring one. By 1441, it had been resolved that Gloucester must be eliminated or at the very least curtailed. Thus it came to be that Eleanor Cobham was accused of sorcery. Astrology was practised by many to forecast what the future may hold, but it was still looked upon with mixed feelings, and any practice of the art had to be very discreet. Roger Bolingbloke, a priest who had some connection with Gloucester and Eleanor, was arrested together with other priests on the grounds that they had cast Eleanor's horoscope to forecast whether she would ever become Queen of England. Whether or not this was ever done is not clear. Bolingbloke subsequently found himself placed on a stage, clad in a fantastic garb and surrounded with the tools of his alleged craft. The Bishops of London, Salisbury and Rochester gave a blistering sermon bidding him to turn his back on all sorts of sorcery. Eleanor promptly fled into sanctuary at Westminster Abbey, which was viewed to signify a guilty conscience. The Abbey gave no sanctuary where sorcery was concerned, and she was subsequently brought before an Ecclesiastical Court. The Church had already used torture to extract the evidence it wanted against her from Bolingbloke and the other priests. Eleanor now found herself facing multiple charges, among them treason, heresy and witchcraft, and was committed to confinement to await further examination. The Beauforts now felt it wise to involve others, particularly the temporal Lords. King Henry VI could be prevailed upon to issue a commission charging several prominent members of the Council to examine the matter further. Accordingly John Holland, Earl of Huntingdon, Humphrey Stafford, Earl of Stafford, William de La Pole, Earl of Suffolk, Henry Percy, Earl of Northumberland, Ralph, Lord Cromwell, John, Lord Fanhope and Robert, Lord Hungerford were charged with the investigative task...

Actions

A. Investigate the matter at once!

  • -10 gold

B. Let the matter drop...

England — Not random

Will happen on October 24, 1441
unless prevented by
Action B of 164234 - Eleanor Cobham's Witchcraft for England

Description

The commission established by Henry VI uncovered a woman known as 'the Witch of Eye'. She had been accused of witchcraft before, but had been released for lack of evidence. She now sold cosmetics, and Eleanor was one of her customers. Eleanor soon found herself with further charges, one of which was that she was an accessory to the treasons alleged against the priest Bolingbloke. Eleanor was further examined by the Bishops of London, Lincoln and Norwich. The examination resulted in further charges alleging an attempt to bring about Henry VI's death by magic. She was said to have made a waxen doll of the King, and to have stuck pins into it designed to produce excruciating pains in the same part of the King's person. She was then supposed to have placed the doll before a hot fire. Its slow melting would have caused the King to die slowly, in excruciating agony. Eleanor, who was prepared to admit that she had bought cosmetics from the Witch, vehemently denied all the other charges against her. The Bishops' task was made no easier by the fact that the King was undoubtedly still alive and in the best of health. Neverthless, the Bishops could rely on the confessions of her co-accused which had been extracted through torture. She was found guilty of all the charges alleged against her and had every expectation of joining the Witch and Bolingbloke at the stake. Despite the grim fate of her accomplices, Henry VI forbade the taking of Eleanor's life. She had served ther purpose, as Gloucester's wife was now associated with witchcraft, a heinous offence. Eleanor was forced to perform a public penance. It was enough that she was to be confined for the rest of her life, first in Chester castle and later in Kenilworth. Henry VI saw to it that she had an ample allowance so that she could live in some degree of comfort. Gloucester was not what he'd once been. He had regarded himself as untouchable, standing as he did so close to the Throne. Now it had been made very clear, and very apparent, that his enemies had found a way to harm him in a manner which he could not easily have foreseen or forestalled. In place of the old recklessness, he now had to be extremely careful, and this was not something that came easily to his nature. The Beauforts had seen to it that he was crushed as a political force. Gloucester was still as popular as ever with the populace, but at Court, men began to drift away from him as the Beauforts were clearly ascendant at Court. King Henry VI may have been pliable, and he still had a great deal of regard for his old uncle. However, if Gloucester filled the King's ear with tales discreditable to the Beauforts, it was only necessary to remind the King that Gloucester's consort had been condemned for sorcery.

Actions

A. Spare Eleanor, but confine her for life

  • Stability +1
  • Monarch's administrative skill +1 for 96 months
  • Monarch's diplomatic skill +1 for 96 months

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Own Gascogne
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • France owns Poitou
    • France owns Guyenne

Will happen within 100 days of January 2, 1442
Checked again every 100 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1442)

Description

In 1442 Rodrigo de Villandrando again had the support of the French King for the depredation of northern Gascony. Later that year he and Charles d'Albret threatened Bazas.

Actions

A. Damn!

  • -1 base tax value in Gascogne
  • -1000 population in Gascogne
  • Gascogne revolts

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1445
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1450)

Description

Henry VI's marriage to Margaret, the daughter of Rene I Duke of Anjou, had cemented the truce of Tours between England and France. Because of Rene's extreme poverty, Margaret brought with her no customary dowry whatsoever. William de la Pole, then Earl of Suffolk, was primarily responsible for the marriage, yet Henry had been sufficiently pleased enough to elevate the Earl to the rank of Marquess. Henry's council was largely headed by Suffolk and backed by the Beauforts, and seemed an indominable group. However, no one seemed prepared for Henry's own venture into foreign politics. The King had promised Charles VII and Rene I the counties of Maine and Anjou and was now pressured to deliver them. Henry VI had dithered to the point that Charles VII now threatening resumption of hostilities. When Henry VI ordered the formal surrender, the governor of Maine could hardly believe it.

Actions

A. Surrender Maine at once

  • +50 relations with France
  • +100 relations with Provence
  • Cede Maine to Provence

B. Renege on our Promise!

  • Stability +1
  • +1 badboy
  • -100 relations with France
  • -100 relations with Provence
  • Maine revolts
  • Start a war with France

England — Not random

Conditions

  • France exists
  • Provence exists
  • England owns Maine
  • England controls Maine
  • The following must not occur:
  • None of the following must occur:
    • England and France are at war
    • England and Provence are at war

Will happen within 60 days of January 2, 1445
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1450)

Description

William de la Pole Earl of Suffolk had been sent to France with the task to bring back a bride for Henry VI. The negotiations had finally settled on Rene I Duke of Anjou's daughter, Margaret. The marriage arrangement cemented a period of truce between England and France, and for this Suffolk elevated to the rank of Marquess. However, Henry had corresponded with King Charles VII and Rene. He had promised Charles to return to Rene the county of Maine. To this end, Suffolk was compliant, and the Queen pushed every chance she had to lobby for her father's sake. Nevertheless, Henry delayed relinquishing the county, however, and Charles's patience was wearing thin. Henry found it difficult to simply give away lands his father, uncle, and his own commanders had fought so hard to retain. Henry's own uncle, Humphrey Duke of Gloucester, had campaigned in that region and would certainly be enraged if an entire county had been ceded without a fight. Extraordinarily, Margaret had arrived with no dowry, and indeed it would appear that Henry was now going to pay a dowry to the Duke of Anjou instead...

Actions

A. Delay relinquishing control of Maine

  • Stability +1
  • Aristocracy +1
  • +200 relations with France
  • +200 relations with Provence
  • Gain a royal marriage with Provence

B. Honor the marriage agreement immediately

England — Not random

Conditions

  • France exists
  • England owns Maine
  • England controls Maine
  • The following must not occur:
  • None of the following must occur:
    • England and France are at war
    • Provence exists

Will happen within 60 days of January 2, 1445
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1450)

Description

William de la Pole Earl of Suffolk had been sent to France with the task to bring back a bride for Henry VI. The negotiations had finally settled on Rene I Duke of Anjou's daughter, Margaret. The marriage arrangement cemented a period of truce between England and France, and for this Suffolk elevated to the rank of Marquess. However, Henry had corresponded with King Charles VII and Rene. He had promised Charles to return to Rene the county of Maine. To this end, Suffolk was compliant, and the Queen pushed every chance she had to lobby for her father's sake. Nevertheless, Henry delayed relinquishing the county, however, and Charles's patience was wearing thin. Henry found it difficult to simply give away lands his father, uncle, and his own commanders had fought so hard to retain. Henry's own uncle, Humphrey Duke of Gloucester, had campaigned in that region and would certainly be enraged if an entire county had been ceded without a fight. Extraordinarily, Margaret had arrived with no dowry, and indeed it would appear that Henry was now going to pay a dowry to the Duke of Anjou instead...

Actions

A. Delay relinquishing control of Maine

  • Stability +1
  • Aristocracy +1
  • +200 relations with France
  • Gain a royal marriage with France

B. Honor the marriage agreement immediately

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Calais
    • Own Picardie
    • Own Berri
    • Own Maine
    • Own Vendée
    • Own Poitou
    • Own Limousin
    • Own Guyenne
    • Own Gascogne
  • None of the following must occur:
    • Own Caux
    • Own Normandie

Will happen within 30 days of September 2, 1445
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1446)
unless prevented by
Action A, B of 164237 - The Lieutenancy of France for England

Description

York had received a summons to Parliament. His presence was necessitated by Henry VI's determination for a lasting peace with France. Henry's determination to press ahead with his policy placed York in considerable political difficulty. The policy was unpopular and was actively resisted in France and to some extent in Henry's Council as well. York's own council in France was uncooperative, and his councillors in England were highly critical. While York had been in France, Adam Moleyns, keeper of the Privy Seal and a staunch ally of Edmund Beafourt Marquess of Somerset, had accused York of corruption and general mismanagement to the detriment of England's positions in France. Not long before this York had received the backing of Parliament and public recognition for his services. Nevertheless, charges of mismanagement were obviously unwelcome from any source, and it was especially disconcerting that they had been pressed by a royal councillor so close to Somerset, Suffolk, and the King. Adding to this was York's hostility towards the conciliatory measures Henry was prepared to make in order to secure his peace with France. Thus, when York sought due payment from the exchequer for his services, he found his inquiries deflected. Despite York's understanding that his summons to England was merely a temporary engagement, Henry refused to reappoint him to the command in France. York's inquiries were brushed off with casual assurances that he had not incurred any Royal displeasure. In reality, Henry and his closest councillors, particularly the Beauforts, had begun to view York with as much distrust and suspicion as they did Gloucester. Subsequently, York, the greatest and mightiest of England's nobles was to be patronized, isolated, and circumscribed. It was the beginning of a series of preemptive measures taken to eliminate a potential source of obstruction to Henry's Royal prerogative.

Actions

A. Replace York with Somerset

B. Keep York in France

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Caux
    • Own Normandie

Will happen within 60 days of September 2, 1445
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1446)
unless prevented by
Action A, B of 164236 - The Lieutenancy of France for England

Description

York had received a summons to Parliament. His presence was necessitated by Henry VI's determination for a lasting peace with France. Henry's determination to press ahead placed York in considerable political difficulty. The policy was unpopular in France and was actively resisted in France and to some extent in Henry's Council. York's own council in France was uncooperative, and his councillors in England were highly critical. In the meantime, Adam Moleyns, keeper of the privy seal, had accused York of favouritism in the payment of some soldiers, non-payment of others, and general mismanagement to the detriment of England's possessions in France. York would retort with charges of his own against Moleyns. Despite the public recognition York had received for his services in an act of Parliament, charges of mismanagement were obviously unwelcome from any source, and it was especially disconcerting that they had been pressed by a royal councillor so close to Suffolk and therefore, to the King. When York sought due payment from the exchequer for his services he found his inquiries deflected, and within the year, his position was given to Edmund Beaufort Earl of Somerset. Given recent Beaufort enterprises into France, the appointment could scarcely generate much confidence within York's council in France. Many assumed that Somerset had been appointed to further a peace policy. Compounding York's problem was the fact that he had taken part in council discussions in England regarding the prospect of surrendering certain English holdings in France, to which he had demonstrated an outright hostility. York was not prepared to support any such conciliatory concession to France. He was equally as unimpressed with several favourable financial settlements confirmed by Henry upon the Beauforts, especially when York's own financial capabilities were being stifled by the lack of payments owed to him. Alternatively, Henry VI could have rewarded York with the Duchy of Normandy. York was after all, England's premier Duke, and he had sacrificed much for Henry's realm. Moreover, slighting York may not be the most wisest of actions in the long run. Of course any act alienating prized Crown possessions of England to those outside of the King's closest advisors would have be met with resistance from Beaufort's and Suffolk's affinity. But then again, these men coveted such lucrative positions for themselves...

Actions

A. Replace York with Somerset!

B. Keep York in France

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 120 days of January 2, 1447
Checked again every 120 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1450)
unless prevented by
Action B of 164003 - The Truce at Tours for England
Action B of 20049 - The Truce at Tours for England
Action A, B of 20051 - Surienne's Disobedience for England

Description

Henry had promised King Charles VII and Rene I Duke of Anjou the county of Maine, and it was time to for Charles to collect. Henry had delayed relinquishing control of Maine to Charles for several years, and Charles had grown impatient. He was now threatening to take Maine by force and was mobilizing his armies to do so. Henry was in no position to put up a fight, and so he eventually ordered the governor of Maine to surrender the county to Charles's forces. However, the Governor refused to do so, and suspected that the orders were fraudulent. It seemed incredible that his King would simply hand over an entire county to the French. Thus, Charles marched on Le Mans, and although the governor held out for some time, no reinforcements were sent and so he surrendered the fortress to the French.

Actions

A. Order Maine's surrender and avoid war!

  • Stability -1
  • Global revolt risk +2 for 4 months
  • +50 relations with France
  • +50 relations with Provence
  • Cede Maine to Provence
  • Event 20051 - Surienne's Disobedience for England will never fire

B. Dishonour the Marriage Agreement

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 120 days of January 2, 1447
Checked again every 120 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1450)
unless prevented by
Action B of 164003 - The Truce at Tours for England
Action B of 20049 - The Truce at Tours for England
Action A, B of 20050 - Surienne's Disobedience for England

Description

Henry had promised King Charles VII and Rene I Duke of Anjou the county of Maine, and it was time to for Charles to collect. Henry had delayed relinquishing control of Maine to Charles for several years, and Charles had grown impatient. He was now threatening to take Maine by force and was mobilizing his armies to do so. Henry was in no position to put up a fight, and so he eventually ordered the governor of Maine to surrender the county to Charles's forces. However, the Governor refused to do so, and suspected that the orders were fraudulent. It seemed incredible that his King would simply hand over an entire county to the French. Thus, Charles marched on Le Mans, and although the governor held out for some time, no reinforcements were sent and so he surrendered the fortress to the French.

Actions

A. Order Maine's surrender and avoid war!

  • Stability -1
  • Global revolt risk +2 for 4 months
  • +50 relations with France
  • Cede Maine to France
  • Event 20050 - Surienne's Disobedience for England will never fire

B. Dishonour the Marriage Agreement

England — Not random

Will happen on February 24, 1447

Description

William de La Pole, Marquis of Suffolk and his allies, the Beauforts, were now the rising power in England. They regarded Gloucester, still heir presumptive to the Throne, as an enemy because he opposed their regime. Suffolk and his adjuvents could count on Queen Margaret, who regarded Suffolk and the Beauforts as supporters, and shared their dislike and distrust for Gloucester. Queen Margaret had little difficulty in persuading the King that Gloucester should be impeached, and Suffolk prepared Articles of Impeachment for Parliament to consider. Writs were issued bidding Parliament to meet at Cambridge for the primary purpose of considering the Articles of Impeachment. It was clear to Suffolk, however, that Gloucester's demise was necessary. A rumour quickly circulated that Gloucester was about to rise in revolt. In this respect, Gloucester played into his enemies hands by raising a small retinue of horsemen. On his way to Parliament, he was arrested without warning. However, Gloucester's immense popularity with the Commons, and Henry's knack for forgiving his subjects, gave Gloucester a good chance of simply enduring a light reprimand. Suffolk understood this all-too well...Gloucester died in confinement within days of his arrest. Meanwhile, Parliament had been moved to an region where Suffolk's supporters were most prominent. And so a Parliament packed with members from Suffolk's own estates had Gloucester attainted. Gloucester's heirs were executed and his lineage was no more. It was impossible to quell the rumours about Gloucester's death, and many assumed Suffolk orchestrated the whole debacle.

Actions

A. Well then...one less thorn in the side

  • Stability +1
  • Centralization +1
  • Aristocracy -1
  • Monarch's administrative skill +1 for 30 months
  • Global revolt risk +2 for 12 months

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Connaught is a vassal of England
    • Leinster is a vassal of England
    • Desmond is a vassal of England
    • Ulster is a vassal of England
    • Own Connaught
    • Own Ulster
    • Own Meath
    • Own Munster
    • Own Leinster

Will happen within 200 days of September 2, 1447
Checked again every 200 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1449)
unless prevented by
Action B of 164236 - The Lieutenancy of France for England
Action B of 164237 - The Lieutenancy of France for England

Description

Henry II had been the first English King to invade Ireland. The resulting Treaty of Windsor had established Henry II as Overlord of the island. Subsequently, a small but steady influx of English 'conquerors' carved out an area of land along Ireland's shoreline which would would later be called 'the Pale'. King John I was granted the Lordship when he was a boy, beginning a traditition that continued for centuries. Although John invaded Ireland and improved the administration and infrustructure of his English possessions, there was little he could do about the assimilation of English settlers into Irish culture. Moreover, his reforms had aggravated both the Irish and the Anglo-Irish. The scenario was not helped during Edward I's reign, as his warmongering had drained the Irish purse. Subsequently, during Edward II's reign, the Crown was forced to cancel the withdrawal of Irish funds for English expediture. Furthermore, the Scottish King Robert I's brother, Edward, invaded Ireland and proceeded to pillage the English lands there. Roger Mortimer, a wealthy English magnate with lands in the Welsh marches, was sent to Ireland as Edward II's response. Mortimer reconquered the English lands on the island, crushing Edward Bruce in the battle at Faughart in Ulster. Mortimer took Edward's lands and created Earldom of Ulster. By this time, however, Ireland was bankrupt and facing widespread famine. The various Irish Lordships possessed by English nobles were held by men who lived in England, and who rarely, if ever, visited their estates in Ireland. Attempts were made in 1297 and 1388 to coerce these absentee landlords into moving to Ireland permanently, through penalty and fine for those who would not. However, this merely served to convince many to sell their estates to Irish Kings, resulting in a further deterioration of English authority in Ireland. During Edward III's reign, his son, Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence invaded Ireland, but the sheer minority of English settlers all but rendered his efforts useless. Clarence recognized that the assimilation of English migrants into the Irish culture was undermining the Crown's authority, and so he issued the infamous Statutes of Kilkenny. The Statute was designed to segregate Englishmen from Irishmen with respect to law, language and custom. In practice, the Statutes were uninforcible and so they were widely ignored. The King's Justiciar remained largely powerless once the Royals left for England. The pattern of invasion and retreat repeated itself as Richard II and Henry IV both subscribed to a traditionally limited role in Ireland.

Actions

A. Appoint York to Lieutenancy of Ireland

B. Send another noble for this office

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 20 days of January 2, 1449
Checked again every 20 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1453)

Description

The seizure of Fougeres by the English precipitated an invasion by Charles VII that expelled the English from the vast majority of France. The events at Fourges are shrouded in controversy. However, it is known that Francois de Surienne, an aragonese mercenary who had risen to become a Knight of the Garter as well as one of Edmund Beaufort's senior commander's in France, had led the army that had sacked Fougeres. Thus it was relatively simple for Charles VII to make the connection between the two, despite Somerset's denial of prior knowledge. Moreover, with the Duke of Brittany having sought Charles VII's aid, the French King was anxious to press and exercise his perceived rights of feudal lordship over Brittany, even in their more subtle forms.

Actions

A. We've Given Charles VII pretext for war!

  • -50 relations with Brittany
  • -50 relations with France

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 60 days of November 2, 1449
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1450)
unless prevented by
Action A of 164180 - English Final Victory for England

Description

Parliament had been prematurely dissolved by Henry earlier in the year due to the Commons' determination to impose an Act of Resumption on the King and their unwillingness to grant Henry further taxation without it. By this time, public hostility and opposition to Henry's regime was high and there were several uprisings which had to be put down. In a subsequent Parliament, the Commons adopted the procedure of impeachment and used it against Henry's corrupt Chief Councillor William de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, challenging the whole policy of the King's government. Henry himself openly favoured the accused, who made an emotional appeal to his King. Despite the Commons' desire for indictment and due process of impeachment and with rioting and unrest plaguing Suffolk's trial, Henry interfered and sentenced his minister to a temporary exile, without any formal verdict of guilt or innocence. In so doing, Henry had flagrantly excercised the royal prerogative in defiance of the Parliamentary proceedings and the justice the realm sought. Nevertheless, the harsh punishment Parliament had failed to obtain was to be provided by the commonality. Suffolk, on his way to exile, was beheaded by an Irishman with six strokes of a rusty sword. Although Suffolk was dead, the Commons would not forget Henry's attempt to save him, no more than they would retreat from the battle for Resumption. The King, far from submitting, resisted the Parliament's efforts until it was eventually agreed that Henry would reserve the right to exempt those whom he alone felt deserved such status. The Acts of Resumption were to be applicable to all of Henry's grants from the moment he assumed the throne on his father's death. Needless to say, many of Henry's Lancastrian supporters would find themsleves quite content. Some would even manage to gain from the act.

Actions

A. Proclaim Suffolk neither guilty nor innocent, exile him, and resist Resumption

B. Proceed with Suffolk's Impeachment and agree to Resumption

  • Stability -2
  • Centralization -1
  • Aristocracy -1
  • Global revolt risk +5 for 60 months
  • A random province revolts
  • Centralization -1
  • Aristocracy -1

C. Proclaim Suffolk Innocent and refuse Resumption

  • Centralization +1
  • Aristocracy +1
  • Global revolt risk +3 for 48 months
  • The capital province revolts
  • The capital province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • Event 164060 - Henry Resumes Crown Lands for England will never fire

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 30 days of November 2, 1449
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after February 11, 1453)
unless prevented by
Action A of 164180 - English Final Victory for England
Action B, C of 164060 - Henry Resumes Crown Lands for England

Description

Adam Moleyns, keeper of the Privy Seal, was murdered early in the by soldiers awaiting transportation to France. He had attacked York's credibility not so long before, and Cuthbert Colville, an esquire in York's service in Normandy, had been party to the deed. In a seperate incident, William Aiscough, Bishop of Salisbury, was torn to pieces by his own parishioners. He'd been dragged from the church, where he had been saying Mass, to the top of a nearby hill and savagely slaughtered. It was widely held that both were covetous men, much hated by the common people, and were said to have promoted Gloucester's death. With these acts of mob violence in the backdrop, a formidable pro-Yorkist movement of Kentishmen revolted against Henry VI's government. The rebels were led by Jack Cade, a former soldier who claimed to be of Mortimer descent. The significance of the claim was twofold. First, Richard II had named Mortimer heir presumptive before his deposition and subsequent murder at the beheast of the Lancastrian usurper, Henry Bolingbloke, Henry VI's grandfather. Moreover, in accordance with England's laws of succession, Mortimer had been the legitimate heir. Second, the Duke of York was a descendent and the sole surviving heir to both the vast Mortimer Marcher lands in Wales, as well as their claim to the throne through Richard II's uncle, Lionel, Duke of Clarence. The majority of the participants of Cade's rebellion were yeomen, husbandmen, craftsmen, and small landowners from Kent, who objected to forced labour, corrupt courts, the arbitrary seizure of land by nobles, the loss of royal lands in France, and heavy taxation. The rebels defeated a small government force sent to disperse them, and then entered London where they were welcomed by those in the city who sympathized with many of Cade's aims. The rebels stormed the Tower of London, and despite failing to take the fortress, executed King Henry's treasurer, Lord Saye. The aims of the rebels were political, and a draft of their Proclamation of Grievances was heavily circulated throughout England before the rebels took to arms. The Proclamation had called for the return of the Duke of York to administrative capacity in the affairs of England, among other things, and an end to the poor governance of Suffolk and his hated affinity.

Actions

A. Traitorous rebel pigs!

  • Stability -1
  • Kent revolts
  • Kent revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • Global revolt risk +3 for 24 months

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 20 days of November 2, 1449
Checked again every 20 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after February 11, 1453)
unless prevented by
Action A, C of 164059 - Suffolk's Impeachment for England

Description

Having agreed to Resumption in the previous session of Parliament, it was now time for Henry to act. For a King who depended so heavily on the support of his nobles this was not going to be an easy measure. Disputes over several large and lucrative inheritances had fractured many of England's nobles into two factions that, if left unchecked, could embroil the realm with civil unrest and perhaps even civil war. As sovereign, Henry had final jurisdiction over whose lands would be resumed and whose would be spared. However, Henry had always been a weak King and so he fell easy prey to the ambitions and machinations of those in his own Court. Thus, Henry favoured his Lancastrian supporters and essentially punished their rival Yorkist faction.

Actions

A. Favour Lancastrians

  • Stability -1
  • +100 gold
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • +1 base tax value in Yorkshire
  • +1 base tax value in Lincoln
  • +1 base tax value in Bristol
  • +1 base tax value in Anglia
  • +1 base tax value in Kent
  • +1 base tax value in Wessex
  • Global revolt risk +3 for 36 months

B. Favour Yorkists

C. Favour neither Lancastrians nor Yorkists

  • Stability -2
  • +150 gold
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • +1 base tax value in a random province
  • +1 base tax value in a random province
  • +1 base tax value in a random province
  • +1 base tax value in a random province
  • +1 base tax value in a random province
  • +1 base tax value in a random province
  • +1 base tax value in a random province
  • Global revolt risk +2 for 60 months
  • Event 164061 - Cade's Rebellion for England will never fire

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 60 days of November 2, 1449
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after February 16, 1453)
unless prevented by
Action A of 164180 - English Final Victory for England
Action B of 164060 - Henry Resumes Crown Lands for England
Action B of 164236 - The Lieutenancy of France for England
Action B of 164237 - The Lieutenancy of France for England

Description

The Duke of York was widely thought to have played an instrumental role in the uprisings and general dissidence of the past few years. York's advisors and councillors were accused of indirect, if not direct, participation. The primary focus of Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, fell on William Oldhall - York's Chamberlain. Somerset had ordered Oldhall's arrest. Oldhall had responded by fleeing to St. Martins for sanctuary where he was subsequently taken by force at the behest of Somerset. the King's pious conscience must have played a part in his release several days after. Meanwhile, York had maintained his innocence, and was by now alarmed by the pressures placed on his Chamberlain. Believing it to be a matter of his own survival and that of England's, he decided to march on the King and have the Duke of Somerset removed from office and placed under arrest. Through his repeated professions of loyalty to King Henry, York declared his actions to be in no way directed against the King. A manifesto was circulated to most of the towns of southern England, and within days several copies had been forwarded to the King. Henry bade his realm to ignore the pamphlets and to obey only royal proclamations. Nevertheless, the political situation deteriorated further. York prepared to move in all haste. He gathered his tenants and retainers from estates spread across southern England and marched to London. Henry, unlike York, enjoyed the support of some sixteen lords with him including the Dukes of Buckingham, Norfolk, and Exeter, and made his way to Barnet. Throughout the various communicative efforts that followed, York maintained his loyalty, stressing that his targets were traitors within Henry's government. Outnumbered, York decided to make for a sympathetic Kent, where he hoped to add to the ranks of his retinue. However, Henry countered and arrived in Kent the day after York, leaving the Duke no time to recruit. Importantly, Henry was now accompanied by the Earls of Salisbury, and Warwick, and the Duke of Somerset, and their respective contigents. York and Henry's forces finally met at Dartford, where York held the field with insufficient forces to coerce the issue. And so, it was at Dartford that York, accompanied by the Earl of Devon, and Cobham, after some negotiations, presented articles of indictment against the Duke of Somerset, kneeling before the King to do so...

Actions

A. Accept York's articles and establish an arbitration panel

  • Stability -1
  • Global revolt risk +2 for 24 months

B. Arrest York and commit him to the Tower at once!

  • Stability -2
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • Global revolt risk +4 for 12 months

C. Sieze Somerset instead!

England — Not random

Will happen within 60 days of November 2, 1449
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after February 21, 1453)
unless prevented by
Action A of 164180 - English Final Victory for England
Action C of 164062 - Dartford for England
Action B of 164060 - Henry Resumes Crown Lands for England

Description

Following Dartford, a panel of arbitrators were created to settle the dispute between York and Somerset. In the meantime, York was made to recite publicly a humiliating oath of loyalty to King Henry at St Pauls. The articles presented by York were aimed against Somerset and were designed to show that the political unrest in England was primarily the result of the King's failure to punish those who had lost France. It was undoubtedly a difficult case to promote, and the articles submitted did not establish the causal connection fully or convincingly. Charges that Somerset had put up an inadequate resistance in France, reduced garrisons, and failed to pay soldiers' wages could be explained by a chronic shortage of exchequer funds. York's strongest points, and those which carried the most substance, lay in Somerset's surrendering of fortresses not then beseiged, and an allegation that Somerset had kept 72,000 francs, which were given to him to pass on as compensation to those who lost rights and property in France. Regardless, to be obliged to take an oath was humilating enough, and for the Duke of York, there was little chance of saving face. Moreover, the panel of arbitrators was to be appointed by Henry and were thus weighted in favour of Somerset. The Crown was not without its share of legal indictments. While most of the Yorkists supporters at Dartford were pardoned, many were put on show trials to demonstrate the majesty of the King, the political pre-eminence of the Duke of Somerset, and the political feebleness of the Duke of York who was powerless to save those on whom he depended. Well over two thousand pardons were granted, as such was the scope of the Yorkist support and of the civil unrest in England. Not everyone escaped such light terms. Many of the gentry found themsleves stripped of their landed possessions, and ultimately attainted in a series of Parliamentary sessions culminating in the infamous Reading Paliament. In the meantime, despite the strong showing of support from the nobles at Dartford, trouble continued for the Lancastrian regime for the remainder of the year, as rebellions broke out in many shires and treasonous conspiracies were discovered in Yorkshire and Suffolk. Despite these instances of discontent, it was clear that the house of Lancaster had received the loyal support of the English nobility at Dartford in a sheer display of strength. York, fortunate to escape any formal charges of treason, was to be confined to his estates indefinately.

Actions

A. Favour Lancastrians

  • Stability -1
  • +100 gold
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • Global revolt risk +3 for 36 months

B. Favour Yorkists

C. Favour neither Lancastrians nor Yorkists

  • Stability -2
  • +150 gold
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • Global revolt risk +2 for 60 months

England — Not random

Will happen within 10 days of August 2, 1453
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1454)

Description

King Henry, who was proposing to embark on a campaign of law enforcement in the provinces, had fallen ill and in this episode rendered catatonic. Somerset and his adjuvents did their best to conceal Henry's condition from the public. Nevertheless, as time progressed, the council could no longer hide Henry's absence and it soon became clear to all that his recovery could not be predicted. Thus, a Great Council was summoned late in October to which Somerset attempted to exclude York. However, the Earl of Salisbury and his son the Earl of Warwick intervened, and sent for York with instructions alluding to the fact that York was to be allowed to press a charge of treason against Somerset, who had for too long enjoyed Henry and Margaret's favour, to the general detriment of the Kingdom and to York. To remedy the current crisis, a series of Parliaments and Council meetings began in November and continued on through April of 1454. Initially, there were at least forty-six peers in London, and they jointly agreed to suppress lawlessness and not sustain each other in any lawless act. With the support of Norfolk, York had Somerset arrested and confined to the Tower of London. However, attempts to resolve issues of executive authority were delayed, mainly by Cardinal Kemp, Henry's Chancellor, who desperately hoped Henry would recover. Matters were further complicated when the Queen submitted a bill of articles, demanding the powers of a Regency, together with sufficient livelihood for herself, Henry, and their newborn son, Edward. The Queen wished to create a household government exercising the role of military Protector of the King and Prince, with sufficient income to sustain its authority and royal power to be exercised by Margaret herself. Fortunately for the Yorkists, Kemp passed away while Council and Parliament continued to mull over the Queen's proposal. On the following day, the Lords sought a sign of recovery from the King, and finding none, moved to establish York as Protector of the Realm. York was not without further difficulties, especially in the north, where Neville hostility towards the Percies found violent outlets. The youthful Duke of Exeter's bid for York's position would further distract the proceedings. Nevertheless, York would manage to secure a degree of stability throughout the realm and would make his first moves to reaffirm the base of support for his regime, however temporary it would be. Thus many Yorkists were ushered into England's government, including the Earl of Warwick's father, Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury, who became Chancellor.

Actions

A. York is Protector of the Realm!

  • Stability +2
  • A random province revolts
  • Monarch's administrative skill +3 for 12 months
  • Monarch's military skill +3 for 12 months
  • Monarch's diplomatic skill +3 for 12 months
  • Global revolt risk +1 for 12 months

B. Grant the Queen a Regency instead

C. Grant Exeter the Protectorate

  • Monarch's administrative skill +1 for 12 months
  • Monarch's military skill +2 for 12 months
  • Monarch's diplomatic skill +1 for 12 months
  • A random province revolts
  • The same province revolts
  • Global revolt risk +2 for 12 months
  • Event 164066 - The Second Protectorate for England will never fire

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 30 days of May 23, 1455
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1455)
unless prevented by
Action C of 164062 - Dartford for England
Action B of 164063 - The Reading Parliament for England
Action B of 164060 - Henry Resumes Crown Lands for England

Description

Just as suddenly as Henry had suffered his mental breakdown, he became well again. During his episode, the Queen had given birth to a boy, whom they had named Edward. The birth of a son strengthened the Lancastrian dynasty, but it hardly improved the immediate prospects for the realm, or for the Duke of York. York was natrurally displaced as heir presumptive to the throne. With King Henry's recovery, the Lancastrians sized the opportunity to isolate the Yorkists. Warwick, Salisbury and Devon, known Yorksits sympathizers fell to disfavour while the Lancastrians further profited at Yorkists expense. Fearing Henry's possible relapse, Somerset moved to settle the form of government to take place in such an event, and to this end, the summons of a Great Council to Leicester would be essential to give authority and dissemination to any proposed settlement. York had to prevent the Great Council from taking place. The duke of York retired north and, together with his Neville allies, no less alarmed than he, and raised forces. Upon learning of York's actions, Henry sent a deputation to York, but the emissaries were simply detained. Whether because of their failure to return, or some other military intelligence, Somerset woke up to the scale of York's military preperations and, accordingly, sent out summons far and wide. Within days, Henry and his loyal followers set out for Leicester. The Yorkists, however, intercepted the King's army en route, just north of London, near a town called St. Albans. Learning of York's location, Henry decided to relieve Somerset of his command, and appoint Buckingham in his stead. Follwing Buckingham's advice, they sought to negotate. The move for change in leadership was likely motivated by Henry's strong desire to avoid conflict, as Buckingham was related to York and was certainly a much more personable candidate. For Somerset this was a most unwelcome dvelopment, as negotiations could only concern his own fate. Henry and Buckingham's confidence in their strategy was boosted when the royal party were able to enter St. Albans unmolested, despite the town's potential for defence, the Yorkists having arrived earlier in the morning. The Dukes of York and Buckingham entered into serious negotiations immediately. However, both magnates were hampered by other issues. Somerset and Norfolk were deliberately provacative. York, on the other hand, was reserved and confined his request to the points at issue between himself and Somerset. York's insistence on the charges against Somerset put Buckingham in an impossible position, however, for as full as Buckingham's powers were, he could not concede what the King had already denied. Regardless, Somerset could scarcely be expected to co-operate. Warwick grasped the point and opened the fighting while the last embers of negotiation still flickered. Once the fighting had started there was no turning back. The King's banner was displayed, marking York and his supporters traitors, defeat now meant death and forfeiture. At some point during the battle, Warwick took a small contigent of archers and men-at-arms and flanked the Lancastrian forces. They entered the town through a gap in the Lancastrian defence and surprised the King's household retainers. In the ensuing struggle, Somerset was cut down with a pole-axe as were Lord Clifford and Northumberland. Henry and Buckingham were wounded and withdraw. The Yorkists found themselves the victors, located the helpless King, and subsequently proffessed their loyalty to Henry.

Actions

A. The Yorkists prevail!

  • Stability -3
  • Global revolt risk +2 for 12 months

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 20 days of September 2, 1455
Checked again every 20 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1456)
unless prevented by
Action B, C of 164064 - King Henry's Illness for England
Action C of 164062 - Dartford for England
Action B of 164063 - The Reading Parliament for England
Action B of 164060 - Henry Resumes Crown Lands for England

Description

At St. Albans York had fought to be rid of Somerset. Arguably, he had to, as Somerset sought his political demise. Since the first seeds of jealousy were sown in 1440 at York's appointment to the French lieutenancy, English politics had swung increasingly uncontrollably from the one interest group to the other. Somerset was not a great duke, and without Henry he could have been brushed aside by York. However, the King was insufficiently ruthless to completely sever his ties to Somerset, as Ministers who loyally discharged Henry's policies were loyally supported in return. The throne was not imperilled at St Albans. Immediately after the battle, Henry could have readily been killed behind closed doors with no witnesses to survive. Neverthless, the royal standard had been abandoned during the engagement and Henry and his Kingdom were in York's hands. In the months that ensued, instability had reigned, and so when parliament and Council met, it was largely concerned with restoring a degree of authority throughout the realm. Order was gradually restored within the realm, and a return of a favourable House of Commons brought the plums of victory to the Yorkists, though York took little reward for himself. The lords, however, made no progress in settling their various quarrels. For those who had been at St Albans there was an urgent need for a full, authorative, and final exoneration, such that they would be actionable in neither the criminal not the civil courts. The act which resulted was structured around the declarations of loyalty made before the battle itself. In casting Somerset as the traitor and the King as misinformed, St Albans became a loyal action, and by repeating, and enrolling, the letters written before the battle, York was, in effect, making a profuse declaration of loyalty to the house of Lancaster. Whatever the truth of his loyalties at St Albans, at Parliament he was the loyal subject of the rightful King, and this loyalty he publicly affirmed by an act of personal homage before Henry, and was followed in this by every other peer present. These apparent conciliatory actions brought some immediate assurance of York's loyalty, but it did nothing to dispose of the other legacy of St Albans, the internecine rivarly of the great families. It was simply beyond the power of the Upper House to heal their divisions. The need for the protectorate was soon pressed by the Commons and York was the unanimous choice. The opposition was either dead, or browbeaten into submission...

Actions

A. Yorkists now dominate our government

  • Stability +2
  • Monarch's administrative skill +4 for 3 months
  • Monarch's military skill +4 for 3 months
  • Monarch's diplomatic skill +4 for 3 months
  • Revolt risk value in Northumberland +2
  • Revolt risk value in Lancashire +2
  • Revolt risk value in Wales +2
  • Revolt risk value in Midlands +2
  • Revolt risk value in Cornwall +2

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 20 days of March 2, 1456
Checked again every 20 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1457)
unless prevented by
Action B of 164064 - King Henry's Illness for England
Action C of 164062 - Dartford for England
Action B of 164063 - The Reading Parliament for England
Action B of 164060 - Henry Resumes Crown Lands for England

Description

The terms of York's protectorate were similar to those imposed a few years earlier, however, Henry's deteriorated physical condition had warranted the introduction of an additional clause. Although York was to excercice authority with conciliar authority, he was only to be dismissed upon consent of the Lords themselves, in parliament. The duration of first Protectorate had been at the disgression of an enfeebled, catatonic monarch. Currently, Henry was not considered ill, and the need was to allow the lords to determine when the circumstances had arisen which would terminate the need for York's services. In typical medievil fashion they gave one definition of these, the majority of the prince of Wales, but the lords in Parliament were not anticipating so long a period. York had done well during his Protectorate, however, during the second parliamentary session, the Commons had pressed once again for resumption. York, with such a favourable Lower House, lent his support for such an act which did not take well to the lords. York had thus found himself in a precarious position, as his dismissal was subject to the discretion of the lords. With dissension at court and in parliament, and facing an increasingly hostile nobility, York resigned and soon retreated to his estates in Yorkshire. The lords once again supported Henry, if only to defend their lands from resumption. The realm meanwhile, would be racked with a series of revolts and skirmishes between feuding nobles. The government was itself going through a process of upheaval. The Queen had already determined to establish herself, together with the prince and their respective households, in the west Midlands, and Henry soon joined them. For the next four years England was to be governed from Coventry, but with the routine bureaucratic functions still discharged in Westminster. It was during this turbulent period that the Queen held a council meeting, and, taking the reins of Henry's household, staged a coup. She dismissed the Yorkist installed Chancellor, Treasurer and Privy Seal, and replaced them with Lancastrian counterparts. The Yorkists were now isolated, and thus joined York in the north. The Lancastrians could now safely seek their vengeance, and would make several unsuccessful attempts on the lives of Salisbury, York, and Warwick.

Actions

A. The King withdraws to Coventry

  • Lose 4000 troops in a random province
  • Lose 4000 troops in a random province
  • Revolt risk value in Northumberland -2
  • Revolt risk value in Lancashire -2
  • Revolt risk value in Wales -2
  • Revolt risk value in Midlands -2
  • Revolt risk value in Cornwall -2
  • Revolt risk value in Yorkshire +2
  • Revolt risk value in Lincoln +2
  • Revolt risk value in Bristol +2
  • Revolt risk value in Anglia +2
  • Revolt risk value in Kent +2
  • Revolt risk value in Wessex +2

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 20 days of January 2, 1458
Checked again every 20 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 2, 1459)

Description

Margaret of Anjou, Queen of England, was by now in full control of Henry VI's Council. She summoned a Great Council to Leicester. The Yorkist Lords were not invited. During the Council, it was agreed that the Queen would call a parliament to Coventry wherun she would present articles of indictement against York and his adjuvents for acts of treason. During the Council, however, the Queen refused to reveal the contents of the indictment. The Yorkists learned of the proceedings at Leicester, and so York, Salisbury, and Warwick hastily gathered their forces. There was little the Yorkists could do other than confront the King and his corrupt Council before parliament could take place. The alternative was attainder and thus forfeiture of their lives and livlihoods...

Actions

A. Yorkists mobilize

  • Revolt risk value in Yorkshire +2
  • Revolt risk value in Lincoln +2
  • Revolt risk value in Bristol +2
  • Revolt risk value in Anglia +2
  • Revolt risk value in Kent +2
  • Revolt risk value in Wessex +2

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 20 days of January 2, 1458
Checked again every 20 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1459)
unless prevented by
Action B of 164058 - The Lieutenancy of Ireland for England

Description

When York summoned the Irish parliament to Drogheda his aim was to unite the Irish in their support for his claim to the throne of England. In order to accomplish this, York utilized his popularity and granted the Irish independence from the writs of the English Crown. Henceforth, English laws passed in Ireland would need to be accepted in an Irish Parliament. In return, York was recognized as the undisputed source of Royal authority, and it became treasonable act to attack the Duke of York in any way. Soon enough, the officer sent by Queen Margaret, who'd been charged with the responsibility of arresting York, found himself incarcirated, and then beheaded. In frustration, Margaret then named James Butler, Earl of Wiltshire, who was also Earl of Ormond, the King's new Lieutenant of Ireland. Ormond held states in Ireland and was charged with the task of harrying York and establishing the Royal authority in Ireland. Ormond's efforts were futile, however, and Irish hostility sent him home to England. York's position in Ireland was secured. He received homage and secured funding and men-at-arms from the Irish for use, no doubt, in England.

Actions

A. Welcome our Irish allies!

  • Stability +1
  • +5000 infantry in a random province
  • +2000 cavalry in the same province
  • Gain Connaught as vassals
  • Gain Ireland as vassals
  • Gain Leinster as vassals
  • Gain Desmond as vassals
  • Gain Ulster as vassals
  • +50 relations with Connaught
  • +50 relations with Ireland
  • +50 relations with Leinster
  • +50 relations with Desmond
  • +50 relations with Ulster

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 20 days of January 2, 1458
Checked again every 20 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1459)

Description

Queen Margaret completed her design of proscribing her enemies. A pliant parliament called to meet at Coventry found Richard Plantagenet Duke of York, Richard Neville Earl of Salisbury, and his son, Richard Earl of Warwick, and many of their followers guilty of treason. They were therfore sentenced to suffer the full effects of a bill of attainder. As such, their lands were to be forfeited and occupied by royal officers or distributed to loyal supporters. For the Yorkists, there was now no other option but to presuade King Henry VI to repeal the Act, or to cut down their Lancastrian rivals on the field of battle. There was only one obstacle between the Yorkists and King Henry, however, and that was the Duke of Somerset and his Lancastrian affinity. Henry shrewdly decreed that those who'd sided with the Yorkists and who would now lay down their arms would receive a full pardon, save those who were to be attainted. Thus there were many who refused to fight among the Yorkist ranks. Lacking numerical superiority from the onset, the prospects for a Yorkist victory on the battlefield looked grim. Heavily outnumbered, York, Salisbury and his son, Warwick abandoned their remaining retinues and fled England. Leaderless, their men simply surrendered to the Lancastrian army.

Actions

A. An immediate crisis has been avoided...

  • Stability +1
  • Revolt risk value in Yorkshire -2
  • Revolt risk value in Lincoln -2
  • Revolt risk value in Bristol -2
  • Revolt risk value in Anglia -2
  • Revolt risk value in Kent -2
  • Revolt risk value in Wessex -2

England — Not random

Will happen within 15 days of January 2, 1458
Checked again every 15 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 2, 1460)

Description

The Earls of Warwick, Salisbury, and the Duke of York's son, Edward Earl of March landed in England with a force that took London without casualty. From London, Warwick and Edward moved north to meet the King's army under the command of the Duke of Buckingham. The two armies met on the field near Northampton. In the ensuing struggle, the Lancastrian force was obliterated and Buckingham was slain. Buckingham's death signalled a turn for the worse for the Lancastrians. As the King's appointed Commander, Buckingham had been Henry's Royal guardian. Thus, the battle of Mortimer's Cross ended with King Henry in the hands of the Yorkists. The victorious army marched back to London with the King where they would exert great influence over him. The Yorkist now held London and the King, but the Queen, the Duke of Somerset, and the Earl of Northumberland were still at large and could field an army in the north which embodied widespread roayalist sypathies. Thus, the Lancastrians would eventually respond with an army of English northerners and Scottish troops sent by the Queen and Regent of Scotland, Mary of Guise. York and Salisbury understood that the north would require subjugation, which itself could not be accomplished without the defeat of the key Lancastrian figures whom were leading the northen horde to retake London. York and Salisbury could not have imagined the size of the northern army they were about to confront.

Actions

A. We must subdue the north

  • Northumberland revolts
  • Northumberland revolts
  • Lancashire revolts
  • Lancashire revolts
  • Revolt risk value in Northumberland +4
  • Revolt risk value in Lancashire +4
  • Revolt risk value in Wales +4
  • Revolt risk value in Midlands +4
  • Revolt risk value in Cornwall +4

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 15 days of January 2, 1458
Checked again every 15 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1460)
unless prevented by
Action B of 276018 - Margaret seeks our Aid for Scotland

Description

Queen Margaret left England sailing for Berwick intending to seek refuge in Scotland where James II, whose mother had been a Beaufort, was a friend to the Lancastrians. The Scottish Queen, Mary of Guelders sent an envoy to escort Margaret to Dumfries where she and her son were warmly received. Although James II had recently deceased, his son James III, then only a boy, was to govern with the aid of a Regency council. The widowed Queen and the Bishop of St. Andrews headed the Regency council and thus Lancastrian sympathy had remained strong. After a lengthy meeting at Lincluden, the two Queens came to an agreement. Scotland would loan Margaret money and men for Margarets campaign against the Yorkists. In return, Margaret agreed to surrender Berwick Castle, and promised an unguarded and rich southern England which the Scottish troops could plunder mercilessly. In response, thousands of Scottish men-at-arms volunteered for the campaign. Upon hearing word of Margaret's alliance with the Scottish Regent, Mary, Warwick utilized the opportunity to unleash a torrent of propaganda. It is possible that the Yorkists had somehow learned the substance of Margaret's alliance with the Scots. Margaret had promised Mary of Guelders Berwick castle and her Scottish soldiers the spoils of pillaging England's village and towns. Regardless, Warwick was quick to issue pamphlets and send heralds all over England with claims that the Queen was leading a massive army of Scotsmen bent on burning, pillaging and destroying all that lay in its path of fury. When the Queen re-entered England, the recklessness of her troops vallidated many of Warwick's warnings, and many villagers swarmed to the Yorkist cause with grave news. London would never forget the Queen's bargain with the Scots, and moreover, would actively assist the Yorkists with funding and troops...

Actions

A. A northern horde is on its way!

  • Stability -1
  • +50 gold
  • -50 relations with Scotland
  • Northumberland revolts
  • Northumberland revolts
  • Yorkshire revolts
  • Yorkshire revolts
  • Lancashire revolts
  • Lancashire revolts
  • Revolt risk value in Northumberland +4
  • Revolt risk value in Yorkshire +4
  • Revolt risk value in Lancashire +4
  • Revolt risk value in Wales +4
  • Revolt risk value in Midlands +4
  • Revolt risk value in Cornwall +4

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 15 days of January 2, 1458
Checked again every 15 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1460)

Description

With London and King Henry secured, York and his allies were now in control of the government, albeit a government which was in dissaray. While the Lancastrians reeled from the disaster at Northhampton, the Yorkists had done their best to quell resistance. When York entered London, he ordered that trumpets be played and his sword be held before him in the manner of King, as he marched to Westminster, where the lords of the land were assembled for his arrival. Entering Westminster Hall he walked up to the throne and placed his hand upon it, then turned to the assembled lords. Instead of the rapturous welcome he had expected, he was met with a stony silence that was eventually broken by the Archbishop of Canterbury, who approached him and asked if he would like to see the King. Without the support of the lords for his claim to be King, York, infuriated, set about the task of obtaining the throne by legal means. The Yorkists organized a full assembly of both houses, and seated the King before the full Parliament in royal regalia. The archbishop of York then narrated the alleged misdeeds of government from a text seemingly dependent on the Calais manifesto. Parliament then proceeded, amidst considerable confusion, to elect a speaker. The Commons was unwilling to agree to Henry's deposition. Originally, York had planned his coronation for the following day, but deffered to baronial council after a confrontation with Thomas Neville. Having submitted his claim to the throne, the lords, after a period of deliberation, agreed to accept York's claim, but to decline to give it any immediate effect. Henry was to have the Crown for his lifetime, afterwhich the Crown would fall to York and his heirs. Thus had passed what later came to be known as the Act of Accord.

Actions

A. York is heir to the throne

  • Stability +1
  • Revolt risk value in Yorkshire -2
  • Revolt risk value in Lincoln -2
  • Revolt risk value in Bristol -2
  • Revolt risk value in Anglia -2
  • Revolt risk value in Kent -2
  • Revolt risk value in Wessex -2

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Calais
    • Own Picardie
    • Own Caux
    • Own Berri
    • Own Maine
    • Own Normandie
    • Own Vendée
    • Own Poitou
    • Own Limousin
    • Own Guyenne
    • Own Gascogne

Will happen within 60 days of January 2, 1459
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1460)

Description

The Merchants of the Staple were members of an English trading company that controlled the export of English raw wool. The staple was created in the thirteenth century, but moved from place to place according to the political needs of the times. In 1363, a group of English merchants located in France was incorporated as the 'Company of the Staple' possessing a complete monopoly of wool exports. With Warwick in control of England's possessions in France, he was able to secure a healthy donation from the company. He was a popular leader among the English troops in France and a series of successful raids against the merchant shipping of the Hanseatic League had enlarged both the caufers and reputation of Warwick and his men. With these new funds, Warwick prepared to launch another Yorkist assault on Lancastrian England.

Actions

A. Good!

  • +100 gold
  • +5000 infantry in a random province
  • +2000 cavalry in the same province
  • -25 relations with a random country
  • -25 relations with a random country
  • -25 relations with a random country
  • -25 relations with a random country

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on December 30, 1460

Description

Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York was cut down leading his heavily outnumbered reinforcements alongside his father-in law, Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury, against a Lancastrian army led by Henry Beaufort, Duke of Somerset. The Lancastrians stripped him of his armour, befouled his body, and then beheaded him posthumously. In the rout, the notorious Lancastrian Lord Clifford had caught York's second son, Edmund, and killed him on the spot - stabbing him through the throat with a dagger. Warwick's father, Salisbury, was captured after the battle and executed the day after. Their heads were subsequently impaled on pikes and displayed in the city of York. A paper crown was placed mockingly on the deceased Duke's head. When York fell, his claim to the throne of England fell to his first born son, Edward of Rouen, Earl of March. Standing 6'4'', Edward cut an incredibly impressive figure. His soldiers, and indeed those of his father, were willing to lay down their lives for Edward and his claim. The future of the House of York now depended on the abilities of this gifted young warrior.

Actions

A. Vengeance!

  • Stability -1
  • Revolt risk value in Yorkshire +4
  • +10000 infantry in the capital province
  • +2000 cavalry in the capital province

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 50 days of January 2, 1461
Checked again every 50 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1461)

Description

Despite a technological superiority, the Earl of Warwick led a Yorkist army to defeat in St. Albans in a result which mirrored the first battle at St. Albans years before. Warwick himself barely esaped, but he had left King Henry under the keep of Lord Bonville and Lord Kyriell. Isolated and vastly outnumbered, Lord Bonville and Kyriell were forced to surrender Henry peacefully. Bonville and Kyriell had treated the Lancastrian King honourably. In return, the King had promised them mercy, but the Queen intervened and asked her 7 year old son, the younge Prince of Wales for judgement. He replied that the two Yorkists should be beheaded. Bonville was appalled and allegedly retorted 'May God destroy those who taught thee this manner of speech!' And with that the two Yorkists were executed on the spot. Without Henry, the Yorkists had little ground for authority. It was no longer possible for Edward to claim, as his father had done earlier, that he had taken up arms in order to remove from Henry the influence of evil councellors. The Commons now acknowledged that the endemic disorder was directly attributable to Henry's weak government. This time, the Yorkists' intentions were to remove him from power and make Edward King. In fact, they had no alternative, for despite Edward's warm welcome in London, he was not in a strong position being, technically, an attainted traitor who lacked funds and the support of the majority of England's magnates. With a parliament in session, the Archbishop of Canterbury, the bishops of Salisbury and Exeter, Warwick, Norfolk, and several other peers held a council at Baynard's Castle. It was unanimously agreed between those present that Edward should be offered the throne. On the following day, a deputation of lords and commons presented a petition to him, begging him to accept the crown and royal dignity of England. Edward acceded to the lords' petition and was shortly thereafterwards proclaimed King Edward IV at Beynard's Castle. However, Edward refused a formal coronation until the Lancastrians were put down in the north.

Actions

A. We must crush the Lancastrians in the north

  • +50 gold
  • +5000 infantry in the capital province
  • +2000 cavalry in the capital province

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 5 days of March 5, 1461
Checked again every 5 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1461)

Description

The fighting at St. Albans had destroyed any possibility for political harmony between Yorkist and Lancastrian factions. York found himself outmaneuvered, with no options except once again to resort to force. In a series of brief and rapid campaigns, open warfare broke out once more in England. York himself was killed in the battle of Wakefield in December 1460, but his son and heir Edward earl of March gained a victory at Mortimer's Cross in February the following year. Soon afterwards, the rival armies approached each other at the village of Towton, where in the midst of a blinding snowstorm they fought the largest and most brutal battle of the era. When the bloody day was done, the throne of England was the victor's prize.

Actions

A. God Save King Edward!

  • Stability -1
  • Revolt risk value in Northumberland -4
  • Revolt risk value in Yorkshire -6
  • Revolt risk value in Lancashire -4
  • Revolt risk value in Wales -4
  • Revolt risk value in Midlands -4
  • Revolt risk value in Cornwall -4
  • Grant independence to Scotland
  • Grant independence to Connaught
  • Grant independence to Leinster
  • Grant independence to Desmond
  • Grant independence to Ulster
  • Monarch Edward IV becomes active
  • Leader Edward IV becomes active
  • Leader Warwick becomes active
  • Leader Northumberland will never be active
  • Event 164158 - The Heirs of York for England will never fire
  • Event 21111 - The Lancastrian Succession for England will never fire

B. Long Live King Henry!

  • Stability -2
  • -100 gold
  • Infrastructure tech investment: -300
  • Revolt risk value in Northumberland -8
  • Revolt risk value in Yorkshire -4
  • Revolt risk value in Lancashire -8
  • Revolt risk value in Wales -8
  • Revolt risk value in Midlands -8
  • Revolt risk value in Cornwall -8
  • Revolt risk value in Lincoln +4
  • Revolt risk value in Bristol +4
  • Revolt risk value in Anglia +4
  • Revolt risk value in Kent +4
  • Revolt risk value in Wessex +4
  • Grant independence to Scotland
  • Grant independence to Connaught
  • Grant independence to Leinster
  • Grant independence to Desmond
  • Grant independence to Ulster
  • Aristocracy +1
  • Event 164077 - King Edward's Coronation for England will never fire
  • Event 21107 - The Readeption for England will never fire
  • Event 21108 - Battle of Tewkesbury for England will never fire
  • Event 21109 - Trial of George Duke of Clarence for England will never fire
  • Event 21112 - Bosworth Field for England will never fire
  • Event 21113 - Battle of Stoke for England will never fire

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 30 days of March 5, 1461
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1461)
unless prevented by
Action B of 21105 - Battle of Towton for England

Description

The coronations of England's Kings had always been splendid affairs, and Edward, with his sense of showmanship, was resolved that nothing should be missing to give the populace the spectacle that it expected.

On Sunday 28th June 1461, the solemn and splendid ceremony was conducted in Westminster Abbey, the cradle of the English Monarchy, by Thomas Bourchier, Archbishop of Canterbury, who now placed the crown on the first of the three Monarchs whom, in the course of his long life, he was to crown. The Archbishop of York, William Booth assisted him.

Afterwards, there was the usual coronation banquet when Sir Thomas Dymoke, the hereditary King's champion, rode into the hall in full armour, flung down his mail gauntlet, and challenged anyone who disputed Edward's right to do battle with him. On Tuesday 30th June, he was due to attend a pageant before St Pauls Cathedral where a descending angel blessed him. It was a happy and joyful occasion on a fine summer's day.

Edward now completed process of rewarding his faithful followers with titles, although in some cases they would have to wait until Parliament had completed the Attainder processes against the defeated Lancastrian Lords before they could receive grants of land to support their new dignities. His 12-year old brother George, newly returned from his refuge in Burgundy, was created Duke of Clarence. His 9-year old brother Richard, who had also come back from Burgundy, became Duke of Gloucester. Henry, Lord Bourchier, the Treasurer, was created Earl of Essex, and particularly bidden to keep a close eye on the Lancastrians of the Earl of Oxford's affinity in the eastern counties. William, Lord Fauconberge was rewarded for his outstanding loyalty to the House of York, and for his valour on the battlefield with the Earldom of Kent. Sir William Hastings, the knight who had been dubbed on the same battle-field, became Lord Hastings of Hastings in Sussex. Sir William Herbert received the first of his promotions as Lord Herbert.

Actions

A. A joyous occasion!

  • Stability +1
  • +50 gold
  • Centralization +1
  • Aristocracy +1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Edward IV is active

Will happen within 50 days of March 5, 1461
Checked again every 50 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1461)

Description

King Edward rode in triumph to York with great solemnity and processions, but as he approached the Micklegate Bar his face set into grim lines as he saw above him the rotting heads of his father, his brother, and his uncle - Warwick's father, the Earl of Salisbury. This horrific sight turned him visibly grey with anger and sorrow, and he vowed that the Lancastrians would taste his vengeance and that those responsible for the deaths of his kinsfolk would be relentlessly sought out and slaughtered. Edward's first order in York was that the heads be taken down and decently interred at Pontefract with the corresponding bodies. He then issued commissions of the peace for the arrest of any Lancastrian rebels. The Yorkist King was greeted warmly in York and the leading citizens begged him for forgiveness. Edward, taking a conciliatory approach, forgave them freely. His hold on the realm was still tentative, and he needed the cooperation of his subjects and earned it with mercy. Within days, representatives from major towns across Yorkshire came and offered their submission to their new King. Edward's officers soon found several Lancastrian rebels hiding in the city, and rounded them up. Amongst them was the Earl of Devon who was mercilessly beheaded. Their heads replaced those of the Yorkists on Micklegate Bar, grim reminders of the fate of those who rebelled against their rightful sovereign.

Actions

A. Yorkshire and the Southwest are pacified

  • Stability +1
  • Revolt risk value in Yorkshire -2
  • Revolt risk value in Cornwall -4

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Event 21105 - Battle of Towton for England has already occurred
  • Connaught is a vassal of England
  • The following must not occur:
    • England and Connaught are at war
  • The following must not occur:
    • England and Connaught are allied
  • Relations with Connaught are at 100 or higher

Will happen within 5 days of March 5, 1461
Checked again every 5 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 30, 1462)

Description

Now that Connaught has sworn vassalage to our new King, we are obliged to protect them.

Actions

A. OK

  • Gain an alliance with Connaught

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Event 21105 - Battle of Towton for England has already occurred
  • Desmond is a vassal of England
  • The following must not occur:
    • England and Desmond are at war
  • The following must not occur:
    • England and Desmond are allied
  • Relations with Desmond are at 100 or higher

Will happen within 5 days of March 5, 1461
Checked again every 5 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 30, 1462)

Description

Now that Desmond has sworn vassalage to our new King, we are obliged to protect them.

Actions

A. OK

  • Gain an alliance with Desmond

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Event 21105 - Battle of Towton for England has already occurred
  • Leinster is a vassal of England
  • The following must not occur:
    • England and Leinster are at war
  • The following must not occur:
    • England and Leinster are allied
  • Relations with Leinster are at 100 or higher

Will happen within 5 days of March 5, 1461
Checked again every 5 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 30, 1462)

Description

Now that Leinster has sworn vassalage to our new King, we are obliged to protect them.

Actions

A. OK

  • Gain an alliance with Leinster

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Event 21105 - Battle of Towton for England has already occurred
  • Scotland is a vassal of England
  • The following must not occur:
    • England and Scotland are at war
  • The following must not occur:
    • England and Scotland are allied
  • Relations with Scotland are at 100 or higher

Will happen within 5 days of March 5, 1461
Checked again every 5 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 30, 1462)

Description

Now that the King of Scotland has sworn vassalage to our new King, we are obliged to protect him.

Actions

A. OK

  • Gain an alliance with Scotland

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Event 21105 - Battle of Towton for England has already occurred
  • Ulster is a vassal of England
  • The following must not occur:
    • England and Ulster are at war
  • The following must not occur:
    • England and Ulster are allied
  • Relations with Ulster are at 100 or higher

Will happen within 5 days of March 5, 1461
Checked again every 5 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 30, 1462)

Description

Now that Ulster has sworn vassalage to our new King, we are obliged to protect them.

Actions

A. OK

  • Gain an alliance with Ulster

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 300 days of March 5, 1461
Checked again every 300 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1470)
unless prevented by
Action A of 21105 - Battle of Towton for England

Description

After the decisive Lancastrian victory at Towton, Somerset was charged with the unenviable task of rounding up York and his retainers, including his younger brother, Gloucester and Lord Fauconberg. Brought before King Henry at the royal camp at Tadcaster in the spring of 1461, York and Gloucester submitted themselves before their baffled sovereign, swearing allegiance to the House of Lancaster and begging the King for a royal pardon. My lord, whilst putting these treacherous siblings to death may seem an obvious end to our problems, it could in fact lead to greater unrest amongst York's former supporters. On the other hand, forgiveness has been the byword of your reign: why not continue this generosity through a policy of repproachment with the heirs of York? Though young, their military prowess and courage in the field are well-attested. Who knows, they may even represent our reversal of fortunes in France...

Actions

A. We must reunite our dynasty and continue the war

  • Stability -1
  • Monarch's military skill +3 for 36 months
  • Leader York becomes active
  • Leader Gloucester becomes active
  • Lose 1000 troops in a random province
  • Lose 1000 troops in a random province
  • Lose 1000 troops in a random province
  • Gain a temporary casus belli against France for 6 months
  • Global revolt risk +1 for 12 months

B. Execute the Yorkist traitors!

  • Stability +1
  • +500 gold
  • Lose 1000 troops in a random province
  • Lose 1000 troops in a random province
  • Lose 1000 troops in a random province
  • +50 relations with France
  • Global revolt risk -1 for 12 months

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Edward IV is active

Will happen within 5 days of March 5, 1461
Checked again every 5 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 1, 1476)

Description

Although Edward had secured most of Southern England, Wales and the Northern expanses were seething with Lancastrian sympathies and were actively harboring some of the most prominent surviving Lancastrians. Several castles in Northumberland and Wales, including strongholds garrisoned by the Percies and Tudor families, respectively, were being held for Henry VI. During this time, the government had no authority in Northumberland. Edward would spend the next few years of his reign campaigning in Wales and the northern shires before the remnants of Lancastrian unrest were put down. It was during the early years of his reign that one of Edward's greatest commanders distinguished himself on the field.

Actions

A. Years in the field...

  • Revolt risk value in Northumberland +2
  • Revolt risk value in Lancashire +2
  • Revolt risk value in Wales +2
  • Revolt risk value in Midlands +2
  • Northumberland revolts
  • Lancashire revolts
  • Wales revolts
  • Leader Lord Hastings becomes active

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Edward IV is active
  • England owns Northumberland
  • England controls Northumberland

Will happen within 15 days of January 2, 1463
Checked again every 15 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1467)

Description

No sooner had Edward secured the Northumbrian Castles than did the north rebel once more. Margaret had once again marched a combined Lancastrian and Scottish army into Northumberland. This time, Sir Ralph Percy, the untrustworthy captain of Bramburgh, allowed the Queen's mercenaries into the castle, enabling the Lancastrians to take it for Henry VI. Percy was also the captain of Dunstanburgh Castle, and as soon as the garrison saw the Queen approaching it also surrendered. Not long after, Sir Ralph Grey's treachery opened the gates of Alnwick Castle to the Lancastrians. Weeks later, the Lancastrians would be marching to Newcastle, and it seemed the north would need to be quelled once again...

Actions

A. Treacherous Percy dog!

  • Stability -1
  • Northumberland revolts
  • Yorkshire revolts
  • Lancashire revolts

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Edward IV is active

Will happen within 90 days of January 2, 1464
Checked again every 90 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1464)

Description

Henry Beaufort Duke of Somerset was the son of Edmund Beaufort Duke of Somerset who was slain during the first battle of St. Albans. Edward had been exceptionally patient and lenient towards Henry. In an attempt to win the notable Lancastrian to the Yorkist cause, Edward had pardoned Henry, restored to him his estates, and had even named Henry his Chamberlain, which gave Henry personal access to Edward. Nevertheless, Henry revolted for Queen Margaret under the Lancastrian banner in a last ditch attempt to overthrow the Yorkist regime. The Duke of Somerset had assembled the remnants of Lancastrian supporters primarily from the deceased Earl of Northumberlands estates. The Yorkist were the victors, their army led by John Neville, Lord Montague, and over thirty Lancastrian leaders, among them Somerset, were either killed on the field or executed after the battle. Among the spoils of the battle was King Henry's war chest. Within a short period of time, even the dethroned King himself was found and transported back to London. The battle marked the beginning of a quick end for the Lancastrian resistance in the north, as within weeks the remaining holdings were recovered. The brilliant and able commander John Neville saw to it that, one after another, Lancastrian heads rolled.

Actions

A. Slaughter Somerset's forces!

  • Stability +3
  • Aristocracy -1
  • Northumberland revolts
  • Yorkshire revolts
  • Lancashire revolts
  • Revolt risk value in Northumberland -6
  • Revolt risk value in Lancashire -6
  • Revolt risk value in Wales -6
  • Revolt risk value in Midlands -6

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 150 days of January 2, 1464
Checked again every 150 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1466)

Description

Edward IV was by now the most eligable bachelor in Europe 'a man so vigorous and handsome that he might have been made for the pleasures of the flesh'. Many in his administration were anxious to find him a suitable bride. Edward, however, found one for himself, marrying Elizabeth Woodville, a woman of questionable birth. Although her mother had been Jacquetta of Luxembourg, her father had been a squire, and later promoted to Lord Rivers. Elizabeth was a widow of the late John Grey, a baron who'd died fighting for the Lancastrians. As such she was considered unsuitable both as a bride for Edward and as a Yorkist Queen. Thus the Nobles reacted with dismay when Edward announced his bride to the Council after having kept it secret for well over four months. Warwick, the most powerful magnate in England had been advocating a French bride for Edward in both the English and French courts, and now faced a serious blow to his political integrity. When Elizabeth came to court she brought with her five unmarried brothers, seven unmarried sisters, and two sons from her previous marriage. As members of the royal entourage, the Woodvilles would have to be elevated to a more respectable status than their background could justify. This meant land, titles and marriages into the English nobility. Warwick, among others, would take great personal insult to the influx of Woodvilles, and could do little as marriage prospects for his own two daughters and heirs dissapeared. Nevertheless there was another English candidate for Edward. Eleanor Talbot who, like Elizabeth, was a widowed Lancastrian, but unlike Elizabeth, was not saddled with a large family to promote in court. Moreover, the Bishop of Bath would later testify that Edward had in fact entered into a marriage contract with Eleanor, a legally binding promise which would render Edward's marriage to Elizabeth void on grounds of bigomy. Of course Edward could have bowed to Warwick's whim...

Actions

A. Welcome Elizabeth Woodville, Queen of England!

  • Stability -1
  • Centralization +1
  • Aristocracy +1
  • -50 relations with France

B. Ahem...welcome Eleanor Talbot, Queen of England!

C. Err...I meant...I'll let Warwick decide...

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Edward IV is active
  • Event 164089 - Elizabeth Woodville for England has already occurred
  • Burgundy exists
  • The following must not occur:
    • England and Burgundy are at war

Will happen within 200 days of January 2, 1466
Checked again every 200 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1468)

Description

Following King Edward's success in the northernmost regions of his realm, the Yorkist regime seemed secure. The fledgling government could finally focus on external matters. Years of war and instability had ravaged England's economy. Particularly hurt was England's trade. Thus, mutual economic and political interests with the Duchy of Burgundy brought Duke Philippe to suggest to Edward that the Duke's granddaughter, Mary, should wed one of Edward's younger brothers. George, Duke of Clarence, was a rash and arrogant upstart and Edward was well aware of that fact. He was equally aware that Clarence was heir apparent to the throne. A union between his ambitious younger brother and one of Europe's mightiest states would only embolden Clarence and damage Edward's personal relations with Duke Charles in the long run. Furthermore, the Earl of Warwick favoured King Louis XI in France, and so he worked feverishly to promote an marriage alliance between the Yorkists and Valois dynasties. A marriage to Burgundy would severely jeopardize Warwick's standing within European diplomatic and political circles, because Edward had given Warwick the impression that he was interested in an Anglo-French alliance. Edward did not agree to Charles's proposal but would eventualy put forth a proposal of his own that did not involve either of his younger brothers. Alternatively, Edward could have put forward his youngest brother, Richard, who was at that point a youthful Duke of Gloucester.

Actions

A. Decline Philippe's offer, but remain favourable

  • +25 relations with Burgundy
  • -25 relations with France

B. Agree to Philippe's offer, Clarence will wed Mary

  • Stability -1
  • +100 relations with Burgundy
  • -50 relations with France
  • Aristocracy +1
  • +1 base tax value in Lincoln
  • +1 base tax value in Anglia
  • +1 base tax value in Kent
  • +1 base tax value in Wessex
  • Event 164092 - Margaret of York and Charles Duke of Burgundy for England will never fire

C. Suggest Gloucester instead

  • Stability -2
  • Global revolt risk +3 for 60 months

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Edward IV is active
  • Event 164089 - Elizabeth Woodville for England has already occurred
  • The following must not occur:
    • England and Burgundy are at war

Will happen within 200 days of January 2, 1466
Checked again every 200 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1468)
unless prevented by
Action B, C of 164089 - Elizabeth Woodville for England

Description

With each shameless Woodville promotion at court, Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick fumed as his influence over his cousin and King of England, Edward, slipped further into the distant past. His own enormous family, the Nevilles, owed its vast wealth and prestige to their shrewed and methodical marriages of their many heirs and heiresses for generations. Ironically, the Earl himself with his emense estates had no sons and only two daughters. With Warwick having reaped the spoils of the defeated Lancastrian nobility, his daughters were to inherit the greatest estates in all of England. Now, because of the social ambitions of the Queen's kindred, it looked as if there would be no one of suitable rank left for them to wed. Moreover, Edward had stubbornly refused to let Warwick have the most desirable matches of all, the King's own youthful brothers George, Duke of Clarence and Richard, Duke of Gloucester. Though Warwick had been York and Edward's strongest supporters, Edward feared mixing the potent ingredients that had derailed Richard II, and again Henry VI's regimes. Ambition and youthful Royals with vast estates had tendencies to create civil strife, weaken Kingdoms, and at the very worst, depose Kings. Afterall, Edward was the product of such a situation and was well aware of that fact. Furthermore, the King wished to release himself utterly of Warwick's arrogant and self-rightous direction. Thus, Edward wrote to the Pope requesting he abstain from granting Warwick or any of his brothers, a Papal Bull sanctioning their marriages to the heirs of Warwick, until Edward himself had agreed.

Actions

A. Deny Warwick's ambitions

  • Stability -1

B. Isabelle will wed a Yorkist Prince

  • Aristocracy +1

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 30 days of June 2, 1468
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1468)
unless prevented by
Action B of 164090 - A Suitor for Duke Charles's Daughter for England

Description

On the 18th June 1468, Margaret of York set out on her journey to be married to Duke Charles 'the Bold' of Burgundy. The wedding spared no expense, from the ceremony itself to Margaret's splendid State entry into Bruges. The marriage Treaty solidified a trade agreement between England and Burgundy, and a treaty of non aggression.

Actions

A. A Happy Occasion!

  • +1 base tax value in Lincoln
  • +1 base tax value in Anglia
  • +1 base tax value in Kent
  • +1 base tax value in Wessex
  • +50 relations with Burgundy

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Edward IV is active
  • Own Wales

Will happen within 15 days of June 2, 1468
Checked again every 15 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1469)

Description

Jasper Tudor, the attainted Lancastrian Earl of Pembroke landed on the Welsh coast in the summer of 1468. Jasper had brought a small force with him to relieve Harlech Castle, and he seized and sacked the town of Denbigh. William, Lord Herbert had acted promptly to prevent him raising the countryside which had always been noted for its Lancastrian sympathies. Tudor was chased into the hills, brought to battle, and soundly defeated. He managed to avoid the clutches of the vengeful Herbert and, with the aid of the country people, made good his escape to France.

Actions

A. Put down the rebellion!

  • Stability -1
  • Wales revolts
  • Wales revolts
  • Global revolt risk +2 for 12 months

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Edward IV is active
  • Own Northumberland
  • Control Northumberland

Will happen within 15 days of June 2, 1469
Checked again every 15 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after July 30, 1469)

Description

Robin of Redesdale had raised a rebellion in the north. His real identity was unknown but he was suspected of having intrigued with several of the Earl of Warwick's agents. Robin led an armed rebellion that was quickly scattered by John Neville, whom had been promoted to the Percy Earldom of Northumberland.

Actions

A. Put these rebels to the sword

  • Northumberland revolts

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 15 days of July 2, 1469
Checked again every 15 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1469)
unless prevented by
Action C of 164089 - Elizabeth Woodville for England

Description

Relations between Richard Earl of Warwick and King Edward IV had never been poorer. The dislike both men shared for each other had become painfully obvious to those who had taken even the slightest note. The earl had refused to attend Council meetings, obey Royal summons, and had even been suspected of dealings with the exiled Lancastrian Queen, Margaret. There had been several minor disturbances, and Warwick's agents had been implicated as participants. Nevertheless, Edward refused to believe that Richard of Warwick who had for so long fought for the House of York could possibly be conspiring against him. In reality, Warwick had sought a special dispensation from Pope Pius II to allow the marriage of Edward's brother, George, to Warwick's daughter, Isabelle. The Duke of Clarence and George Neville, Archbishop of York was summoned from London and rode hard for Dover to set sail to France. There, the Archbishop joined George and Isabel in Holy Matrimony. A second rebellion was incited by Robin of Redesdale, this time in the Midlands, where his forces were to be combined with Warwick's and Clarence's. The Earl of Devon and Earl of Pembroke had raised troops for King Edward, but on the eve of battle a quarrel between the two resulted in Devon abondoning Pembroke. In the ensuing struggle, Pembroke's army was defeated and he and his son were taken prisoner by Warwick and summarily beheaded along with Richard Woodville and his son John. Devon was eventually caught and executed as well. Warwick at the head of his army now advanced to sieze King Edward.

Actions

A. Curses!

  • Stability -3
  • Lose 5000 troops in a random province
  • Lose 5000 troops in a random province
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 30 days of September 2, 1469
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1469)

Description

Warwick had made a grave miscalculation during the weeks following his victory at Edgecote. Instead of persuing all of his enemies and rivals across the realm, his army had melted back to their humble origins. He now held the reigns of the government, but without the complacency of the King, Warwick's command was a dead letter. Thus, when a rebellion broke out yet again in the north led by Sir Humphrey Neville, a member of the branch of the family who had always sided with Lancaster, in order to restore Henry VI, Warwick realized that nobody in the realm was willing to fight for a noble who lacked a commission in the King's name. Thus, when Warwick asked Edward to sign the commission to raise the necessary troops, he failed to recognize that these troops would ultimately obey King Edward over the Earl. Warwick returned with the King's troops having supressed the rebellion, only to discover that Edward had announced that he was going to London. There was nothing the Earl could do. Edward would simply place him under arrest, or worse, if the Earl refused to allow Edward to leave. The nobles of the realm had disliked the Woodville's, and Warwick had done them a favour by executing their most prominent members, however, they weren't gong to support Warwick's big to place Clarence on the throne. And so Warwick and Clarence now found themselves isolated. The Earl and Duke reluctantly attended a Great Council, and were conditionally pardonded by the King.

Actions

A. The King is Free!

  • Stability +2
  • A random province revolts

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 30 days of September 2, 1469
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1469)

Description

No ssoner had Warwick and Clarence been pardonded than they again plotted against Edward. Within months Warwick had stirred rebellion once more, this time in Lincolnshire. On this occasion, however, clarence had met with Edward in London in order to install a false sense of security in his brother. Warwick and Clarence requested commission to raise forces to quell the rebellion, and so Edward obliged. Nevertheless, Edward made his way with his army to meet with the rebels. The rebellion was quelled by Edward's troops without a fight. Among the possessions abandonded on the field were liveries belonging to Warwick and Clarence, and a chest full of correspondence between Warwick, Clarence, and the rebels themselves. Warwick and Clarence had betrayed Edward again. This time there would be no mercy, and the Earl and Duke knew it. The two fled, along with many of their supporters for France, where they would eventually seek aid from King Louis XI whom would orchestrate an alliance between the surviving exiled Lancastrians and the traitorous Yorkist magnates. In the meantime, Edward reasoned correctly that Warwick would try for Calais, and so he shrewdly sent orders to refuse Warwick's entry. Duke Charles of Burgundy assisted where he could, patrolling the seas for Warwick.

Actions

A. There is little else we can do...

  • Stability -1
  • +50 relations with Burgundy
  • -50 relations with France

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 20 days of September 2, 1470
Checked again every 20 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after September 30, 1470)

Description

King Louis XI of France had orchestrated a reconsiliation and allaince between the disgruntled Yorkists and the exiled Lancastrians led by the unrelenting though aged Lancastrian Queen, Margaret, and her seventeen year old son, Edward. This paradoxical alliance was bent on restoring Henry VI to power. Priot to Warwick's landing, Henry, Baron Fitz-Hugh, at Warwick's urging, began a rebellion in the North. The Fitz-Hughes were known Lancastrians, and Henry had fought for Lancaster at the second battle of St Albans not too many years ago. King Edward decided to take his men north to stamp out the rebellion, and thus invite Warwick to land. The King planned to subsequently raise troops in the north at York and along his way south to meet Warwick on the field and destroy the traitorous magnate once and for all. Instead, once Edward supressed the rebellion, he found himself an exile at Duke Charles's court. The key difference was John Neville Marquess of Montagu, Richard Earl of Warwick's brother, who had lost the Earldom of Northumberland to Henry Percy. Despite Montagu's exemplary service to the House of York, even in the face of Warwick's rebellions, Edward found he could trust the Nevilles no longer and had deprived John of the Earldom not too many months before. Although Edward had seemingly compensated John for his loss with a promotion to Marquess and estates in Devonshire, John's new estates and offices paled in comparison to what he had enjoyed before in the north. And so the Marquess had decided to support Warwick's bid to reinstate Henry VI as King of England. Edward's men learned of John's plan, and compelled their King to flee abroad.

Actions

A. OK

  • Stability -2
  • Northumberland revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Edward IV is active

Will happen on October 4, 1470
unless prevented by
Action B of 21105 - Battle of Towton for England

Description

By the late 1460s, the Yorkist regime appeared to have gained considerable stability as the Lancastrian cause waned. Edward IV increasingly asserted his right to make his own policies, particularly in his choice of Elizabeth Wydville as his Queen, contrary to the advice and interests of his ally Richard, earl of Warwick and his brother and heir, George, duke of Clarence. Frustrated and finding themselves isolated from the King's inner circle, the two men established contact with several prominent Lancastrian exiles and concocted a plot to remove Edward and 'readept' Henry VI, since Hexham a prisoner in the Tower of London. The coup was a success, with Edward and most of his supporters escaping to his brother-in-law's court in Dijon, whence they began to plot their revenge.

Actions

A. We are the Maker of Kings

  • Monarch Richard Neville (Henry VI) becomes active
  • Stability -2
  • Revolt risk value in Northumberland +3
  • Revolt risk value in Yorkshire +3
  • Revolt risk value in Lancashire +3
  • Revolt risk value in Wales +3
  • Revolt risk value in Midlands +3
  • Revolt risk value in Lincoln +3
  • Revolt risk value in Bristol +3
  • Revolt risk value in Anglia +3
  • Revolt risk value in Kent +3
  • Revolt risk value in Wessex +3
  • Revolt risk value in Cornwall +3
  • -100 relations with Burgundy
  • +50 relations with France

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 100 days of January 2, 1471
Checked again every 100 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1472)

Description

The Generous Peace signed by King Henry V and King Charles VI of France effectively delayed the surrender of England's possessions in France for half a century. Calais and Gascogne were England's residual territories, and it was now time to surrender them peacefully to the French. King Henry VI, son of King Henry V, faced enormous pressure from both the merchant class, whom were vested in England's commercial interests in the lowlands and southwestern France, and the Yorkists, a faction of England's nobility whom had opposed Henry VI's government, to defy France. Nevertheless, Henry VI and his trusted ministers knew, like his father before him, that England could ill-afford a prolonged war with France.

Actions

A. Hand Calais and Gascogne to France as stipulated

  • Stability -2
  • Cede Calais to France
  • Cede Gascogne to France
  • Calais will no longer be considered a national province
  • Gascogne will no longer be considered a national province
  • +100 relations with France
  • Event 170175 - King Henry VI Claims Calais and Gascogne for France will never fire

B. Refuse to uphold the Treaty

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Richard Neville (Henry VI) is active

Will happen on April 12, 1471
unless prevented by
Action B of 21105 - Battle of Towton for England

Description

In March 1471 Edward embarked his return to England with a Burgundian-raised army of 2000 men. Landing at Ravenser on the Yorkshire coast, he soon rallied a larger force and marched on London, meeting and destroying Warwick's army and killing the Kingmaker himself at Barnet on 14 April. Having gained control of the capital (and quietly disposed of Henry VI), Edward turned west to meet another threat. Margaret of Anjou and her son the Lancastrian Prince of Wales had landed with a French-financed army in the southwest and were marching toward the Midlands. On May 4 Edward intercepted and defeated this last hope of the House of Lancaster at Tewkesbury, and according to legend killed the Prince of Wales with his own hand at the high altar of Tewkesbury Abbey. With the Lancastrian dynasty all but exterminated, Edward spent the next thirteen years reforming the government and giving England the peace and stability it longed for.

Actions

A. The throne is safe

  • Monarch Edward IV becomes active
  • Monarch Richard Plantagenet (Edward V) becomes active
  • Leader Edward IV becomes active
  • Leader Gloucester becomes active
  • Stability -2
  • +200 gold
  • +100 relations with Burgundy
  • -100 relations with France
  • Revolt risk value in Northumberland -3
  • Revolt risk value in Yorkshire -3
  • Revolt risk value in Lancashire -3
  • Revolt risk value in Wales -3
  • Revolt risk value in Midlands -3
  • Revolt risk value in Lincoln -3
  • Revolt risk value in Bristol -3
  • Revolt risk value in Anglia -3
  • Revolt risk value in Kent -3
  • Revolt risk value in Wessex -3
  • Revolt risk value in Cornwall -3

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Edward IV is active
  • Country is not at war
  • France exists
  • Burgundy exists
  • Brittany exists
  • Stability is at 2 or higher
  • None of the following must occur:

Will happen within 80 days of April 13, 1471
Checked again every 80 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 6, 1477)

Description

After the unforeseen débâcle that was the Readeption (1470) and the subsequent 'mopping up' of what remained of the Lancastrian nobility, Edward IV's kingdom was both a stable and a prosperous one. By the middle of the decade, the restless and still relatively youthful King decided to call Parliament in order to raise taxes to fund his next project: the resumption of hostilities with France. The prospect of a war with the Valois was always a sure means of making Parliament open their purses, and by late June the Yorkist nobility had amassed the largest army sent to France until the First World War: 1,500 men at arms, 15,000 archers and countless horse, cannon and auxiliaries slogged their way through the Flanders mud. At the head of the Royal Army were Edward, Gloucester and Lord Hastings. The plan was for Edward to rendezvous with his brother-in-law, the duke of Burgundy, and their combined forces would call King Louis' army to battle and a second Agincourt would be won by the end of the campaigning season. With the cream of the French nobility once again dead or captured, France would be ripe for dismemberment. Though Edward still pressed his claim to Louis' throne, he had neither the patience nor the resources to undertake the sort of exhausting campaigns of conquest which had destroyed Henry V’s health. Thus, Edward narrowed his demands to the duchy of Normandy in full sovereignty and what in effect amounted to the entire French treasury.

Actions

A. Demand what is ours!

B. We have not the means to back up these threats...

  • Stability -1
  • +50 relations with France
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Caux is a national (core) province
  • Normandie is a national (core) province
  • Country is not at war
  • Event 164249 - Treaty of Picquigny for England has already occurred
  • None of the following must occur:

Will happen within 360 days of April 13, 1471
Checked again every 360 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 31, 1819)

Description

My lord, we have lost our ancient homeland of Normandy. Years of high taxes, popular French influence and the English Crown's negligence have rendered any genuine talk of our claims there absurd. Our former Norman subjects have welcomed the invaders with open arms, and both the treacherous sénéchal and the local militia have defected. Noble sovereign, Normandy is lost forever!

Actions

A. Our future lies over the seas!

  • Caux will no longer be considered a national province
  • Normandie will no longer be considered a national province
  • Stability -1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Edward IV is active

Will happen within 360 days of January 2, 1478
Checked again every 360 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1478)
unless prevented by
Action B of 21105 - Battle of Towton for England

Description

Even after his betrayal in 1470, Edward pardoned his brother Clarence and allowed him to retain enormous estates and power, but Clarence's erratic and provocative behavior became steadily more dangerous. Finally in 1478 Edward had had enough. Clarence was charged with treason, condemned by Parliament, and executed.

Actions

A. Malmsey?

  • Stability -1
  • +200 gold
  • Infrastructure tech investment: +200
  • +1 base tax value in Northumberland
  • +1 base tax value in Yorkshire
  • +1 base tax value in Lancashire
  • +1 base tax value in Wales
  • +1 base tax value in Midlands
  • +1 base tax value in Lincoln
  • +1 base tax value in Bristol
  • +1 base tax value in Anglia
  • +1 base tax value in Kent
  • +1 base tax value in Wessex
  • +1 base tax value in Cornwall

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1482
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1500)

Description

With the death of the Angevin pretender, Charles III, the direct line of Anjou had come to an end. Moreover, the people of Anjou and Maine, after years of smoldering unrest, have finally come to accept our lawful goverance. Well done! Our iron fist has broken the rebellion!

Actions

A. Excellent!

  • Stability +1
  • Revolt risk value in Maine -4
  • +2 base tax value in Maine

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Edward IV is active
  • The following must not occur:
    • England is a vassal of Scotland
  • Scotland is a neighbor

Will happen within 120 days of July 2, 1482
Checked again every 120 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after November 30, 1482)

Description

In 1482 Edward IV of England launched a full-scale invasion against Scotland, led by the Duke of Gloucester, later Richard III of England, and including Alexander, Duke of Albany and brother of James III, styled ''Alexander IV'', as part of the invasion party. James III, in attempting to lead his subjects against the invasion, was arrested by a group of disaffected nobles, at Lauder Bridge in July 1482 and was imprisoned in Edinburgh castle. A new regime, led by 'lieutenant-general' Albany, became established during the autumn of 1482.

Actions

A. Do we really have control over Scotland?

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Richard Plantagenet (Edward V) is active

Will happen on May 1, 1483

Description

The rise of Richard of Gloucester to the throne of England was never an immediately obvious one. Gloucester had been exemplary in his continued loyalty and support towards King Edward during his lifetime, especially in stark contrast to their other brother, Clarence, who time and time again had rebelled against Edward's rule, and paid the ultimate price for it. Though the will of Edward IV no longer survives, historians generally believe that Gloucester was to be appointed Lord Protector during his nephew's minority. Afterall, Gloucester, along with Lord Hastings, was the single most loyal and experienced man in the Yorkist camp. Moreover, after Edward's issue he was heir to the throne. At Stony Stratford on the night of April 30th, 1483, Gloucester had Earl Rivers and Sir Richard Grey, the King's half-brother, arrested for treason and sent to Pontefract Castle, one of Gloucester's northern strongholds. The securing of the young King's person was seen as an effective way of preserving the continuity and stability of the realm under those whom it was considered were best-placed to look after him, and at the time was certainly never perceived as a move against the King himself. Earl Rivers, the Queen's brother, was seen by the Woodville faction as an alternative to Gloucester as Lord Protector, and indeed, it is said that King Edward pleaded with his uncle not to arrest his Woodville favourites. Lord Hastings enthusiastically backed Gloucester's coup at Stony Stratford. Gloucester was simply protecting his nephew from the what was seen as the largely negative and highly suspicious influence of the Queen and her family. For as long as he commanded Hastings' loyalty and support, Gloucester's actions were vindicated.

Actions

A. I am Lord Protector!

B. Let Rivers run the show...

  • Monarch Anthony Woodville (Edward V) ° becomes active
  • Monarch Edward V becomes active
  • Monarch Richard III ° becomes active
  • Leader Edward V becomes active
  • Leader Richmond becomes active
  • Monarch Henry VII will never rule
  • Monarch Henry VIII will never rule
  • Stability -1
  • Global revolt risk +3 for 24 months
  • Event 164266 - The Great Betrayal for England will never fire
  • Event 21110 - To Kill a King for England will never fire

England — Not random

Will happen on June 14, 1483
unless prevented by
Action B of 164265 - Stony Stratford for England

Description

If there was one man who could be considered the perfect servant of the House of York, it was William Hastings. Hastings succeeded his father in service to the York family and through his allegiance became a trusted friend and military partner to the future Edward IV, whom he was to serve loyally all his life. He fought with Edward at the Battle of Mortimer's Cross and was present at the proclamation of Edward as king in London on March 4th 1461 and then when the new king secured his crown at the Battle of Towton shortly thereafter. Hastings was also one of the leaders of the 1475 expedition to France, as well as de facto ruler of the kingdom whenever Edward was ill or otherwise absent from court. With the establishment of the Yorkist regime, Hastings became one of the key figures in the realm, most importantly as Lord Chamberlain, an office he held for the duration of the reign and which made him one of the most important means of access to the king. He was also created Baron Hastings, a title reinforced by grants of land and office, primarily in Leicestershire and Northamptonshire. His importance in these years is recorded in a number of sources and was recognized by the greatest peer of the realm, Warwick the Kingmaker, who gave Hastings his widowed sister Katharine Neville in marriage. Furthermore, Hastings supported Gloucester in his coup at Stony Stratford, considering him a safe pair of hands in contrast to the unpredictable and power-hungry Woodville family. With time, however, Gloucester's ambitions boiled over - not content with having himself appointed undisputed Lord Protector after the arrest of Rivers and Grey, Gloucester had Hastings and his entourage arrested at a council meeting in the Tower in June, 1483. Without trial or even a valid sentence against him, Hastings was then immediately led out into the courtyard and executed. Gloucester knew that if he did indeed seek the throne, Hastings would have to go. Of course, he could have been spared, but it was clear from the outset that Hastings' loyalty was always going to be to the children of Edward IV, his sovereign and best friend. Dealing with a man so loyal and popular was always going to be difficult.

Actions

A. If he's not with me, he's against me!

B. Not poor Hastings, the most loyal son of York...

  • Stability -1
  • Global revolt risk +3 for 24 months

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Richard Plantagenet (Edward V) is active

Will happen on June 21, 1483
unless prevented by
Action B of 164265 - Stony Stratford for England

Description

After the success of his political coup at Stony Stratford, Gloucester had a free reign in the everyday upbringing of the King, not to mention an unparalleled level of influence over his decisions. Having pleaded with the Queen to release the ten year-old Duke of York from his sanctuary at Westminster, the royal brothers were inturned in the Tower, the traditional residence of a king before his coronation, and in no way sinister or against the ordinary. From here, Gloucester's decisions proved fatal. He was undisputed ruler of the kingdom. According to legend, like de Montfort before him and Cromwell after, Gloucester was asked numerous times to take the crown so as to ensure stability . Eventually, he accepted, though it would of course be naïve to suggest his actions had never taken this into account from at least Hastings' execution, if not right from Stony Stratford. June 1483 was forever the month that blackened the name of Richard of Gloucester and ultimately sealed the fate of his dynasty. The actions of the man known unto history as King Richard III were at no point a foregone conclusion. On the one hand, Gloucester was a skilled administrator with a proven record of military success, in particular during the Anglo-Scottish war. His arguments for claiming the throne were simple, . Moreover, argued Richard, his nephews were both bastards by virtue of their father's alleged pre-marriage contract. he could provide England with firm and stable leadership. The young Edward was undeniably his father's eldest son, legitimate or not. Could Richard rule as Lord Protector until King Edward came of age, or murder his own flesh & blood and take the throne for himself, risking rebellion, anarchy and complete diplomatic isolation in the process. Not until the days of Oliver Cromwell would an Englishman wield so much power with such devastating results.

Actions

A. King Richard, eh?

  • Monarch Richard III becomes active
  • Leader Richard III becomes active
  • -25 relations with France
  • -25 relations with Scotland
  • -25 relations with Brittany
  • -25 relations with Austria
  • Global revolt risk +10 for 24 months
  • The capital province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • +100 gold
  • Stability -3
  • -6 diplomats
  • +5 badboy

B. There is already a King of England!

  • Monarch Edward V becomes active
  • Monarch Richard III ° becomes active
  • Leader Edward V becomes active
  • Leader Richmond becomes active
  • Monarch Henry VII will never rule
  • Monarch Henry VIII will never rule
  • Global revolt risk +2 for 24 months
  • A random province revolts
  • Stability -1
  • Event 164269 - Titulus Regius for England will never fire

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Henry VI is active

Will happen on July 26, 1483
unless prevented by
Action A of 21105 - Battle of Towton for England

Description

In the decades after Towton Henry VI reigned but did not rule, the real power in the land being Queen Margaret of Anjou and her favourite, the Duke of Somerset. Meanwhile, the Prince of Wales, the ever-warlike Edward of Westminster, grew to a sickly, arrogant and frivolous manhood, dying alongside his guardian (and, some would say, father) the Duke of Somerset in the midst of the second of Jack Cade's popular rebellions. Henry VI enjoyed a long and futile reign, whilst his second son, Prince Edmund, died before him, in July 1483, of consumption and gall at the long wait - so that when the aged but less than revered monarch passed away, he was succeeded by his nephew Henry Tudor, the seventh of the name.

Actions

A. Henry, Earl of Richmond and Prince of Wales

  • Stability +1
  • Aristocracy +1
  • Serfdom -1
  • Centralization +2
  • Mercantilism -1
  • Innovativeness +1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Richard Plantagenet (Edward V) is active

Will happen on January 24, 1484
unless prevented by
Action B of 21110 - To Kill a King for England

Description

Titulus Regius was an Act of Parliament passed during Richard III's one and only parliament held in 1484, setting out in detail his claim to the throne. It is generally accepted that Titulus Regius incorporates the text of the petition presented by the Duke of Buckingham to the assembly of the Lords and Commons which met on June 25th 1483 at the Guildhall in London and which was presented to, and accepted by, the Duke of Gloucester on the following day, from which date he thereafter considered to be the beginning of his reign as Richard III. The Act makes a number of claims, the primary one being that Edward IV's childen were illegitimate. As it was the intention of Henry VII to marry Elizabeth of York, the eldest daughter of Edward IV and thereby 'unite' the divided houses of York and Lancaster, he did not want any doubts expressed regarding his future wife's status - the Act was therefore repealed and Henry ordered all copies of Titulus Regius destroyed. The text has only survived because it was copied into a work known as the Croyland Chronicle, a single copy of which survived and was discovered in 1619 by Sir George Buck, a noted Stuart historian. The Act goes on to confirm Richard's other brother Clarence's status as a traitor, and thus he (though already dead) and his successors were also barred from the throne. As such, Richard wished simply to tie up any loose ends as to the validity of his claim to the throne and the facts surrounding his nephews' illegitimacy.

Actions

A. They are both bastards, fit not to reign o'er us!

  • Stability -1
  • Monarch's administrative skill -2 for 24 months

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Henry VII is active

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1485
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1509)

Description

The Court of Star Chamber was a court of law which evolved from meetings of the King's royal council. Although its roots go back to the medieval period, the court only became powerful as a separate entity during the reign of Henry VII. In 1487 the court became a judicial body separate from the King's council, with a mandate to hear petitions of redress. The Court of Star Chamber was named for the star pattern painted on the ceiling of the room at Westminster Palace where its meetings were held. In a sense the court was a supervisory body.

Actions

A. Yes we need one

  • Centralization +2
  • Stability +1
  • Global revolt risk +3 for 60 months

B. No we don't

  • Aristocracy +2
  • Centralization -1
  • Innovativeness -1
  • Stability +1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Henry VII is active

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1485
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1509)

Description

King Henry did continue the Yorkist tradition of promoting government officers from the middle class (primarily clerics and lawyers.) But he did not create the middle class government that many historians propose

Actions

A. Give them our support

  • Innovativeness +1
  • Aristocracy -1
  • Mercantilism -2
  • Stability -1

B. Prohibit them from working in the Government

  • Innovativeness -1
  • Aristocracy +1
  • Serfdom +1
  • Land +2
  • Stability +1
  • +100 gold

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Henry VII is active

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1485
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1509)

Description

The position of Justice of the Peace (JP) originated in England in about the 12th Century AD, believed to be from a Royal Edict issued by King Richard I (the Lionheart) and the Archbishop of Canterbury in the year 1195 AD. The title was first known as Custodes Pacis (Custodians of the Peace), but was later changed to Justices of the Peace. An act concerning Justices of the Peace was passed in 1489. It required that justices devote part of every quarter session to acknowledgment of the areas in which they themselves are particularly weak. The same act provided the general populace with the right to complain about the actions of justices directly to the monarch or his council. The appointment of the justices by the Lord Chancellor at irregular annual intervals allowed for the possible removal of uncooperative gentlemen at the next annual re-issue of the commissions.

Actions

A. Yes we need them

  • Centralization +1
  • +1 base tax value in Northumberland
  • +1 base tax value in Yorkshire
  • +1 base tax value in Lancashire
  • +1 base tax value in Wales
  • +1 base tax value in Midlands
  • +1 base tax value in Lincoln
  • +1 base tax value in Bristol
  • +1 base tax value in Anglia
  • +1 base tax value in Kent
  • +1 base tax value in Wessex
  • +1 base tax value in Cornwall
  • Gain bailiff in Northumberland
  • Gain bailiff in Yorkshire
  • Gain bailiff in Lancashire
  • Gain bailiff in Wales
  • Gain bailiff in Midlands
  • Gain bailiff in Lincoln
  • Gain bailiff in Bristol
  • Gain bailiff in Anglia
  • Gain bailiff in Kent
  • Gain bailiff in Wessex
  • Gain bailiff in Cornwall
  • -200 gold
  • Stability -2

B. No that is the Noblemen's job

  • Serfdom +1
  • Aristocracy +1
  • Stability +1
  • +100 gold

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on April 10, 1485
unless prevented by
Action A of 164266 - The Great Betrayal for England

Description

Of all the mistakes and errors of judgment Richard III made during his brief reign, allowing his elder brother's best friend to live was probably the greatest. After being spared his life on the condition that he swear an oath of loyalty to Richard as his rightful sovereign, Hastings was seemingly out of danger, Richard, however, was not. On April 9th, 1485, the anniversary of Edward IV's death, Hastings and his faithful retainers rose up in revolt, demanding the trial of King Richard for his various wicked crimes against both the late King Edward and his family and the common people of England. Hastings' goals were to oust Richard, restore Edward V or his brother if either were alive, and put Richard on trial in a manner not too dissimilar to that which would bring about the downfall of Charles I. Though popular and respected by many, the fear of Richard's reprisal was greater, and Hastings' rebellion was put down relatively quickly. Hastings was executed and his lands being absorbed into the crown. To Richard, it was Pyrrhic victory, he'd defended his throne on the field of battle, and a major thorn in his side had been removed. On the other hand, his unpopularity with the common people, Hastings had been one of the few reminders of the success and popularity of Edward IV's later years. Now he was gone, and Richard would soon follow him.

Actions

A. Is there not a man in this kingdom I can trust!?

  • Stability -2
  • Global revolt risk +10 for 6 months
  • The capital province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Richard III is active

Will happen on August 23, 1485
unless prevented by
Action B of 21105 - Battle of Towton for England

Description

Richard III had many enemies, and on 7 August, Henry Tudor landed near Milford Haven with about 2,000 French mercenaries and a handful of Lancastrian lords and knights. He gathered reinforcements as he marched through Wales, then through Shrewsbury, Stafford and Atherstone. Richard was at Nottingham, and moved from there to Leicester on 19 August, and by 21 August the two armies were facing each other about two and a half miles south of Market Bosworth. Richard's army was just under 12,000 strong, but 4,000 of his troops were commanded by the Stanley brothers, whose loyalty was suspect. Henry had only 5,000 troops. During the battle Both the Stanleys turned neutral and withdrew to a defensive position just north of the battlefield, swinging the numerical strength if not to Henry's favor at least improving his situation. The battle was fought on and around Ambion Hill, close to Sutton Cheney, and lasted only two hours. Richard had the better position, but did not take advantage by attacking Oxford while he was still deploying his troops. This allowed Oxford to launch the first attack and the Duke of Norfolk, who was commanding Richard's forward battle division, was soon desperately pressed. For the first hour, the fighting was evenly matched, but Richard lost the battle through the treachery of the Stanleys, who deserted his cause. Even more damaging was of the Earl of Northumberland's failure to bring Richard's reserves into action when he saw the Stanleys withdrawing from the battlefield. Richard made a last attempt to win victory by directly attacking Henry with is personal guard, and almost succeeded, having cut down Henry's standard bearer. Richard's gamble failed, and he was struck down. The battle ended when Richard died. The Stanley brothers and Norfolk immediately started to negotiate with Oxford. Henry fearing that the conflict would spread attended the meeting bringing an end to the miseries of England. It was decided that the Dukes of England was to take part of Government and support their new King, Henry VII Tudor.

Actions

A. A horse, a horse! My kingdom for a horse!

  • Global revolt risk -10 for 24 months
  • Stability +1
  • Aristocracy +1
  • Serfdom -1
  • Mercantilism -1
  • Innovativeness +1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Anthony Woodville (Edward V) ° is active

Will happen on December 25, 1485
unless prevented by
Action A of 164265 - Stony Stratford for England

Description

After the events of Stony Stratford, Earl Rivers' domination of the young King Edward V was complete. His only major rival had been Richard of Gloucester, the King's uncle, who had, rather surprisingly, decided to concede the Protectorate to Rivers on hearing the King's pleas to do so. On submitting to the young King's will, Gloucester retired to his powerbase in the North, which he would continue to rule on behalf of his nephew with great diligence and popularity until his death. From 1483 until Edward declared his majority in 1490, Rivers and the rest of the Woodville family ruled over an increasingly prosperous and stable kingdom. By 1490 the throne of England had been ruled by two Yorkist kings, the transition between the two being both undisputed and peaceful: a first since the death of Henry V in 1422. Richard of Gloucester never quite forgave the Queen and her family's increasing influence of his nephews, but not once after Stony Stratford did he mention the subject again, instead choosing to accept political defeat and remain a loyal - if embittered - subject of the King.

Actions

A. ACTIONNAME164268A

  • +1 base tax value in Northumberland
  • +1 base tax value in Yorkshire
  • +1 base tax value in Lancashire
  • +1 base tax value in Wales
  • +1 base tax value in Midlands
  • +1 base tax value in Lincoln
  • +1 base tax value in Bristol
  • +1 base tax value in Anglia
  • +1 base tax value in Kent
  • +1 base tax value in Wessex
  • +1 base tax value in Cornwall
  • Aristocracy +1
  • Serfdom -1
  • Centralization -1
  • Innovativeness +1
  • Global revolt risk -10 for 24 months
  • Stability +3

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Henry VII is active

Will happen on June 17, 1487
unless prevented by
Action B of 21105 - Battle of Towton for England

Description

Two years after Bosworth, a last Yorkist attempt was made to unseat Henry Tudor.

Actions

A. Lambert Simnel, eh? Put Him to Work in my Scullery

  • Yorkshire revolts
  • Yorkshire revolts
  • Lancashire revolts
  • Meath revolts
  • Stability +1
  • -100 relations with Burgundy
  • -100 relations with Austria
  • -50 relations with Connaught
  • -50 relations with Leinster
  • -50 relations with Desmond
  • -50 relations with Ulster

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Henry VII is active
  • Event 170200 - The Treaty of Châteaubriant for France has already occurred
  • None of the following must occur:
    • England and France are at war
    • England and Brittany are at war

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1488
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1489)
unless prevented by
Action B of 170200 - The Treaty of Châteaubriant for France

Description

Brittany was the last of the great feudal fiefdoms of France that retained its old independence, and King Charles VIII of France and his Council were bent on completing the policy of Louis XI by annexing the Duchy. In England, there was a strong feeling against allowing such an important province to be added to the French Crown. Added to this, was the obvious strategic threat posed by a Breton coast under French rule. Nevertheless, the King was reluctant to go to war with France and instead preferred a diplomatic settlement. While the King and his Council discussed the developments in France, Lord Woodville, Governor of the Isle of Wight with a contigent of men crossed to Brittany and placed himself under the orders of Fracois II Duke of Brittany. The King promptly disowned the act...

Actions

A. Do not interfere directly...

B. To war with France!

  • Start a war with France

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Henry VII is active
  • Event 164018 - Crisis in Brittany for England has already occurred
  • None of the following must occur:
    • England and France are at war
    • England and Brittany are at war

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1488
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1489)

Description

In the spring King Henry VII concluded a treaty with the Duchess Anne by which England would send several thousand troops to aid Anne in the defence of her Duchy. In return, Anne was to make her resources available at a time of Henry's choosing to recover any of England's old possessions in France.

Actions

A. Do not directly interfere...

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Own Wessex
  • None of the following must occur:

Will happen within 30 days of March 2, 1495
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1515)

Description

The Admiralty was instituted to give the growing naval power an efficient and strong strategic leadership at Sea. Earlier there had only existed a number of odd King's ship's, each of which were the King's personal property. By making the admiralty responsible for all warships and the production of new and the repair of old the English navy got continuity and order. The Admiralty was also a plant school for military leaders and also important figures in the political life of London.

Actions

A. Let us authorize the Admiralty

  • -2 base tax value in Wessex
  • -200 gold
  • Naval tech investment: +800
  • Trade tech investment: +400
  • -20 national manpower
  • Gain shipyard in Wessex
  • Land -1

B. Let us institute the Royal Army instead

  • -2 base tax value in Anglia
  • -300 gold
  • Land tech investment: +800
  • Infrastructure tech investment: +400
  • Gain barrack in Anglia
  • Land +2

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Own Wessex
  • The following must not occur:
  • Land is at 7 or higher

Will happen within 30 days of March 2, 1495
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1515)

Description

England as we know it decided on becoming a naval power and instituted the Admiralty as one of its assets. There were also signs of England taking another route, a route toward the continent and Land Power. Some elements can be found in Cromwell's New Model Army, but also the question-marks of a possible pro-French Stuart Dynasty and/or if England had managed to keep some of its French possessions. If that had happened England would have had much greater interests to protect on the Continent than on the High Seas.

Actions

A. Let us institute the Royal Army

  • -2 base tax value in Anglia
  • -300 gold
  • Land tech investment: +800
  • Infrastructure tech investment: +400
  • Gain barrack in Anglia
  • Land +2

B. Let us authorize the Admiralty instead

  • -2 base tax value in Wessex
  • -200 gold
  • Naval tech investment: +800
  • Trade tech investment: +400
  • -20 national manpower
  • Gain shipyard in Wessex
  • Land -1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Belle Isle has been discovered by Europeans
    • Bay of Fundy has been discovered by Europeans

Will happen within 30 days of March 6, 1496
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 2, 1506)

Description

After the great discoveries of the Spanish and Portuguese sailors - seeking for a new Spice Trade road - in America and Africa, the King of England Henry VII also decided himself to seek the famous passage of the West. Historically, John Cabot - an Italian - was selected for this expedition but, unlike his Iberian counterparts, he chose to try to find a passage in the north. Thus he led to the neighbourhoods of Bonavista's peninsula.

Actions

A. I hope that Neptune is with us...

  • Belle Isle will be considered a national province
  • Anticosti will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Will happen within 360 days of January 2, 1500
Checked again every 360 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1500)

Description

Erasmus a humanist who was the greatest scholar of the northern Renaissance the first editor of the New Testament and also an important figure in patristics and classical literature had great influence on theological debate during his life. As a man of the middle ground his views made him a beacon for those who valued liberty more than orthodoxy.

Actions

A. OK

  • Innovativeness +1
  • Centralization +1

England — Not random

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1509
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1521)

Description

The population of England lived on the land under a manorial system. They were primarily tenant farmers who were tied to a particular locality, rarely if ever leaving their places of birth. With the rise of commerce, it became increasingly profitable for the aristocracy who owned the land to enclose it. The enclosure movement displaced the tenant farmers and caused a movement into the cities. As people congregated in cities, they became sources of cheap labor for the factories and mines that developed. The concentration of population into cities, however, also created a class of poor, many of whom were willing to became 'indentured servants' and migrate to the North American colonies in search of a better life.

Actions

A. Reform

  • +1 base tax value in Midlands
  • +1 base tax value in Lincoln
  • +1 base tax value in Bristol
  • +1 base tax value in Anglia
  • +1 base tax value in Kent
  • +1 base tax value in Wessex
  • Stability -3
  • Global revolt risk +1 for 240 months
  • Midlands revolts

B. Do not reform

  • Centralization -1
  • Serfdom -2
  • Stability +1

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 500 days of October 11, 1510
Checked again every 500 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after April 2, 1512)
unless prevented by
Action B, C of 17024 - The Holy League against France for Papal States
Action B, C of 236006 - The Holy League against France for The Pope
Action A, B, C of 164253 - The Holy League against France for England

Description

In 1510 Venice submitted to the Pope, thus lessening the league of Cambrai. Conditions were hard for Venice, the Republic had to renounce her traditional power to appoint bishops as well as all jurisdiction over Papal subjects in Venetian territory and was to compensate Pope Julius II for his war expenses needed to recapture the Papal holdings in Romagna, while the Pope accepted the humble request of the Republic for pardon, cancelling the interdict. But the reconciliation between Venice and the Pope did not stop the French to continue the war against Venice with attacks to her cities in Terraferma. Julius II, in the meanwhile, had become increasingly concerned by the growing French presence in Italy and formulated plans, both to chase the French out of the Po Valley and to seize the Duchy of Ferrara, a French ally, with the intention to add the territories of Modena, Reggio and Ferrara to the Papal States. In realizing his plan the Pope immediately excommunicated Alfonso d'Este, Duke of Ferrara, declaring his fief forfeited for his remaining loyal to France, then he gained the military support of Venice, eager to recover her territories lost to the French a armies and hired an army of Swiss mercenaries to attack Milan as to isolate the French armies in Italy. However his plans failed as the French army managed to invade Romagna and occupy the cities of Bologna and Ravenna, supported by the powerful and celebrated artillery of Duke Alfonso d'Este. In addition, in response to Pope's switching sides, Louis XII of France convoked a Schismatic Council at Pisa as to have the 'Warrior Pope' deposed. Pope Julius II, having unsuccessfully pressed the Republic of Florence to refuse hosting the schismatic cardinals, proclaimed the Holy League against France and convoked a Council of his own to meet at the Lateran in Rome. The promise of territorial gains at French expense caused Ferdinand II of Aragon and Emperor Maximilian I to abandon their alliance with the French, and in October 1511, they joined the newly-formed Holy League together with Julius II and the Republic of Venice. In November, Henry VIII of England and the Swiss confederation joined as well.

Actions

A. Express Support

  • Gain a temporary casus belli against France for 36 months
  • -150 relations with France
  • +150 relations with Austria
  • +150 relations with Venice
  • +150 relations with Aragon
  • +150 relations with Papal States
  • Event 164253 - The Holy League against France for England will never fire

B. Stay neutral

  • +50 relations with France
  • -50 relations with Venice
  • -50 relations with Austria
  • -50 relations with Aragon
  • -50 relations with Papal States
  • Event 164253 - The Holy League against France for England will never fire

C. Express Hostility

  • +150 relations with France
  • -150 relations with Venice
  • -150 relations with Austria
  • -150 relations with Aragon
  • -150 relations with Papal States
  • Event 164253 - The Holy League against France for England will never fire

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 500 days of October 11, 1510
Checked again every 500 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after April 2, 1512)
unless prevented by
Action A, B, C of 17029 - The Holy League against France for England

Description

In 1510 Venice submitted to the Pope, thus lessening the league of Cambrai. Conditions were hard for Venice, the Republic had to renounce her traditional power to appoint bishops as well as all jurisdiction over Papal subjects in Venetian territory and was to compensate Pope Julius II for his war expenses needed to recapture the Papal holdings in Romagna, while the Pope accepted the humble request of the Republic for pardon, cancelling the interdict. But the reconciliation between Venice and the Pope did not stop the French to continue the war against Venice with attacks to her cities in Terraferma. Julius II, in the meanwhile, had become increasingly concerned by the growing French presence in Italy and formulated plans, both to chase the French out of the Po Valley and to seize the Duchy of Ferrara, a French ally, with the intention to add the territories of Modena, Reggio and Ferrara to the Papal States. In realizing his plan the Pope immediately excommunicated Alfonso d'Este, Duke of Ferrara, declaring his fief forfeited for his remaining loyal to France, then he gained the military support of Venice, eager to recover her territories lost to the French a armies and hired an army of Swiss mercenaries to attack Milan as to isolate the French armies in Italy. However his plans failed as the French army managed to invade Romagna and occupy the cities of Bologna and Ravenna, supported by the powerful and celebrated artillery of Duke Alfonso d'Este. In addition, in response to Pope's switching sides, Louis XII of France convoked a Schismatic Council at Pisa as to have the 'Warrior Pope' deposed. Pope Julius II, having unsuccessfully pressed the Republic of Florence to refuse hosting the schismatic cardinals, proclaimed the Holy League against France and convoked a Council of his own to meet at the Lateran in Rome. The promise of territorial gains at French expense caused Ferdinand II of Aragon and Emperor Maximilian I to abandon their alliance with the French, and in October 1511, they joined the newly-formed Holy League together with Julius II and the Republic of Venice. In November, following the Swiss declaration of war on France, Edward V threw his lot in with the Valois, hoping to repair his kingdom's tattered relations with his powerful southern neighbour whilst determined to thwart Imperial ambitions in Italy and re-establish Plantagenet influence in Paris.

Actions

A. Express Hostility

  • +150 relations with France
  • -150 relations with Venice
  • -150 relations with Austria
  • -150 relations with Aragon
  • -150 relations with Papal States
  • Event 17029 - The Holy League against France for England will never fire

B. Stay neutral

  • +50 relations with France
  • -50 relations with Venice
  • -50 relations with Austria
  • -50 relations with Aragon
  • -50 relations with Papal States
  • Event 17029 - The Holy League against France for England will never fire

C. Express Support

  • Gain a temporary casus belli against France for 36 months
  • -150 relations with France
  • +150 relations with Austria
  • +150 relations with Venice
  • +150 relations with Aragon
  • +150 relations with Papal States
  • Event 17029 - The Holy League against France for England will never fire

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Austria exists
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • State religion is protestant
    • State religion is reformed

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1527
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1529)

Description

After Emperor Charles V had rejected the Protestants' confessional positions at the Imperial Parliament of Augsburg (1529-1530), the North German Protestant Imperial estates formed the League of Schmalkalden, with a joint army and treasury and seeking ties abroad (France). The League enjoyed early successes in the years 1532-1540 as the Emperor was threaten by Turkish danger and forced to conclude Religious peace settlements in Nuremberg (1532) and Kaaden (1534).

Actions

A. Give it our support

  • +50 relations with Brandenburg
  • +50 relations with Hanover
  • +50 relations with Hesse
  • +50 relations with Palatinate
  • +50 relations with Saxony
  • +50 relations with Cleves
  • -50 relations with Papal States
  • -50 relations with Spain
  • -100 relations with Austria
  • +50 relations with Strasburg

B. Ignore it

  • -50 relations with Brandenburg
  • -50 relations with Hanover
  • -50 relations with Hesse
  • -50 relations with Palatinate
  • -50 relations with Saxony
  • +50 relations with Austria
  • +50 relations with Spain
  • -50 relations with Strasburg

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Henry VIII is active
  • State religion is catholic

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1534
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1541)

Description

Henry VIII Tudor of England (1509-1547) had first received in 1521 the papal title of Defensor Fidei (Defender of the Faith) for his pamphlet against Luther. The King's main concern was over his succession and in 1529, when the papal Curia rejected his proposal to divorce Catherine of Aragon, he had the Legate of the Pope, Cardinal Wolsey, executed and coerced the English clergy to recognize the King as the supreme head of the Church. He had his divorce granted in 1533 and married the lady-in-waiting Ann Boleyn (executed 1536). Altogether, Henry VIII contracted 6 marriages.

Actions

A. Take Command of the Church of England

  • Change religion to protestant
  • +250 gold
  • -100 relations with Papal States
  • Centralization +1
  • Stability +1
  • Religion in the capital province changes to protestant

B. Accept Rome's Supremacy, but ignore it on a personal level

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Own Wales
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • State religion is protestant
    • State religion is reformed

Will happen within 360 days of January 2, 1536
Checked again every 360 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 31, 1819)
unless prevented by
Action A of 330000 - The Crown of England for Wales

Description

Wales had been conquered by England during the reign of Edward I, but was considered a separate country until Parliament passed the Welsh Act of Union in 1536. This act, combined with a further one in 1543, gave Wales representation in Parliament, made it subject to the same laws as England, and also made English the primary language of Wales. This hastened the anglicization of Wales, making it easier for the English to administer the province.

Actions

A. Pass the Act

  • Culture in Wales changes to english

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 30 days of October 2, 1536
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1536)
unless prevented by
Action B of 3009 - The Act of Supremacy for England

Description

The north of England did not react with enthusiasm to the Act of Supremacy, and many were scandaled by the King's execution of Anne Boleyn and quick marriage to Jane Seymour. When Thomas Cromwell issued commissions to close the monastaries of the region, they were infuriated and rose in revolt under the leadership of Robert Aske. The rebels were numerous and managed to seize York and were joined by most of the gentry and many of the northern councillors. The Duke of Norfolk, with a small force to suppress the rebellion, promised to refer the grievances of the rebels to Parliament, but this did not amount to anything, and 200 rebel leaders, including Aske, were eventually executed.

Actions

A. The North is in Arms!

  • Northumberland revolts
  • Yorkshire revolts
  • Lancashire revolts
  • Lincoln revolts

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Henry VIII is active
  • The following must not occur:

Will happen within 30 days of October 3, 1542
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1542)

Description

The King has made an attempt to bring the Irish nobles into a closer relationship with us by offering to give the Irish Kings English titles, making them English earls in exchange for swearing fealty to him. The Irish have accepted the offer!

Actions

A. Splendid!

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on May 2, 1544
unless prevented by
Action B of 20424 - Beaton regains control for Scotland
Action B of 276024 - Beaton regains control for Scotland
Action B of 276025 - Beaton regains control for Scotland

Description

The failure of his marriage alliance with Scotland left Henry VIII furious. Determined to force the Scots to accept the marriage, he ordered the earl of Hertford to invade.

Actions

A. Attack Immediately!

  • -100 relations with Scotland
  • +2000 infantry in Northumberland
  • +1000 cavalry in Northumberland

B. Wait to see how things develop!

  • -25 relations with Scotland

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Event 20425 - The Murder of Cardinal Beaton for Scotland has already occurred
  • None of the following must occur:
    • Scotland is a vassal of England
    • Relations with Scotland are at 100 or higher

Will happen on September 2, 1546
unless prevented by
Action B of 20425 - The Murder of Cardinal Beaton for Scotland

Description

The English government reacted slowly to the siege of St. Andrew's Castle in the aftermath of Cardinal Beaton's murder, but in September 1546 Protector Somerset invaded to support the cause of religious reform, destroying a Scottish army at Pinkie.

Actions

A. Attack Scotland

  • -100 relations with Scotland
  • +2000 infantry in Northumberland
  • +1000 cavalry in Northumberland

B. Wait to see how things develop

  • -25 relations with Scotland

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Own Cornwall
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • State religion is protestant
    • State religion is reformed

Will happen within 10 days of June 2, 1549
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1554)

Description

In 1549 the Act of Uniformity made it illegal to use the Latin Prayer Book, which was to be replaced by the new English Book of Common Prayer. The people of Cornwall, who were used to the old service and many of whom did not speak English, rose up in revolt demanding a return to the Latin mass.

Actions

A. Impose the English Prayer Book by Force

  • Cornwall revolts
  • Cornwall revolts

B. Let Them Be

  • Centralization -1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Edward Seymour (Edward VI) is active
  • Event 3009 - The Act of Supremacy for England has already occurred
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • State religion is protestant
    • State religion is reformed

Will happen within 60 days of October 2, 1549
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1551)

Description

Dudley was among the sixteen members of the Regency Council King Henry had appointed to govern the kingdom during Edward's minority. The new King's uncle, Edward Seymour, Duke of Somerset, was elected Lord Protector just before the coronation. That year Dudley sought and was duly granted the right to bear the arms of the Earls of Warwick, with the distinctive badge of the Bear and the Ragged Staff. By the end of 1549 most councillors, including Thomas Cranmer, the Earl of Arundel, William Paulet, and William Cecil, were turned against Somerset and united behind Dudley, the man with the ambition, will and determination to oust the Protector. Dudley lead the palace rebellion against Somerset in 1549, leading to Somerset's imprisonment and eventual execution in 1552. Unlike Somerset, whom he had outmanoeuvred, Dudley did not take the title of Lord Protector, and encouraged Edward VI to proclaim his majority. Nonetheless, Dudley effectively ruled the country by holding the two offices of Lord President of the Council and of Great Steward of the King's Household. Dudley was given the title of Duke of Northumberland in 1551. Dudley obtained such an influence over Edward that the King was ready to make it appear that Dudley's ideas were actually his own. Whether or not it was justified, Dudley acquired a bad reputation, becoming known as a 'tyrant', sometimes referred to as the merciless 'Bear of Warwick'. Despite the differing opinion of his character, some argue in Dudley's favour that he consulted the Privy Council regularly, did not make any executive decisions, and did not use the title 'Lord Protector' that Somerset had done. Dudley also began the political education of the young Edward VI.

Actions

A. Hand Dudley the reigns of government

  • Monarch John Dudley (Edward VI) becomes active
  • Centralization -1
  • Aristocracy +1
  • +25 relations with France
  • +25 relations with Scotland
  • +100 gold

B. Seymour's guidance is best...

  • Stability -1
  • Aristocracy -1
  • A random province revolts

C. We don't need a Protector, the boy's old enough to rule

  • Monarch Edward VI becomes active
  • Centralization +1
  • Aristocracy -1
  • Stability +1

England — Not random

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1551
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1574)

Description

English financier, born in London, and educated at the University of Cambridge. After attending the university, he was apprenticed to his uncle, a merchant, in whose service he displayed unusual business ability. In later years he became one of the wealthiest men in England. In 1551 he was appointed a factor, or royal agent, by King Edward VI. Charged with the management of the royal debt abroad, he virtually liquidated it by adroit financial manipulations on the bourse, or stock exchange, of Antwerp. He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth I in 1559. While serving as her financial agent abroad, Gresham found that his tasks were difficult to execute because of the lower value of English currency in relation to the currencies of other countries

Actions

A. Reform

  • -10% inflation
  • +2 base tax value in Anglia
  • Stability +3

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Innovativeness is at 6 or higher
  • Russia exists

Will happen within 150 days of January 2, 1553
Checked again every 150 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1566)

Description

In 1553, the Merchant Adventurers Company sent a fleet of three ships with the intent of sailing to China through the Northeast Passage. Most ships were struck frozen by the ice-cap and all their crew died of starvation, except the Edward, under senior navigator Richard Chancellor, who entered the White Sea and reached Arkhangelsk, a small village that would later grow to a port in 1584. There he learned about the wealth and power of the Russian emperor and journeyed in horse-drawn sleighs, in winter, to Moscow. Although Russia and England had diverging interests in establishing relationships with each other, the Muscovy Trade Company formed to exploit the new trade was a commercial success, in particular with the Russian fur trade.

Actions

A. We will exploit this!

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Monarch John Dudley (Edward VI) is active
    • Monarch Edward VI is active
  • Event 3009 - The Act of Supremacy for England has already occurred
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • State religion is protestant
    • State religion is reformed

Will happen on July 6, 1553

Description

As fifteen year-old Edward VI lay dying in July 1553, his Catholic half-sister Mary was still the heiress presumptive to the throne. However, Edward named the Protestant heirs of his father's sister, Mary Tudor, as his successors in a will composed on his deathbed, probably under the persuasion of Northumberland. Both Edward and Northumberland knew that this effectively left the throne to Edward's cousin Jane Grey who, like them, was a staunch Protestant. Four days after King Edward's death, Northumberland had Lady Jane Grey proclaimed Queen of England. Within only nine days, Mary had managed to find sufficient support to ride into London in a triumphal procession on 19th July. Parliament had no choice but to declare Mary the rightful Queen and denounced and revoked Jane's proclamation as having been coerced. Nevertheless, many high-ranking nobles had proved themselves pliable to having Jane as Queen. Acting largely out of financial self-interest, they supported her even if only as part of a power struggle to keep the staunchly Catholic Mary from ascending the throne. Jane's rule ended quickly when the nobles abandoned their support once they realised Mary had won the day. Mary originally pardoned both Jane and her husband, though after a subsequent attempt by their supporters to seize the crown, Mary had them executed for high treason. Had the Protestant plot been successful, Jane would ruled in place of the unpopular and unpredictable Mary, though it is difficult to say what would have happened on the latter's death. Mary's much more popular Protestant half-sister, Elizabeth, would then have been heir, and with her claim being decidedly stronger than Jane's, she would have been her obvious successor, and may well even have been pressured into taking the throne for herself...

Actions

A. Mary Tudor is our Queen!

  • Aristocracy -1
  • Innovativeness -1
  • +25 relations with Scotland
  • +25 relations with France
  • +25 relations with Spain
  • A random province converts to the state religion
  • The capital province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • Stability -1
  • Event 164264 - The Protestant Succession for England will never fire

B. Adhere to King Edward's will

  • Monarch Jane becomes active
  • Monarch Mary I will never rule
  • Aristocracy +2
  • Innovativeness +2
  • -50 relations with Scotland
  • -50 relations with France
  • -50 relations with Spain
  • A random province converts to the state religion
  • The capital province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • Stability -2
  • Event 164270 - The Protestant Succession for England will never fire

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on July 20, 1553

Description

As the granddaughter of King Henry VIII's elder sister Mary, Lady Jane Grey had a claim to the English throne. Married against her will in 1553 to Lord Guildford Dudley, son of the Duke of Northumberland, she was used as a pawn by Northumberland, who was King Edward VI's regent, in his determined effort to retain his power after the King's death. King Edward VI was deadly sick and during his last illness Northumberland had him sign a 'device' excluding Henry VIII's daughters, the future Queens Mary I and Elizabeth I, from the throne in favor of Jane. On July 10, 1553, four days after Edward's death, Jane was proclaimed Queen. Her reign lasted only until July 19. The country supported the Catholic Mary's claim, and Northumberland's forces were dispersed by troops loyal to Mary. Lady Jane's life was initially spared, but convinced she did not need another focus of Protestant opposition and a further rival to the throne Mary had Jane and her husband executed on Tower Hill on February 12, 1554.

Actions

A. Let us revolt against Northumberland

  • Global revolt risk +6 for 36 months
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • Stability -1

B. Let us negotiate with Northumberland

  • Centralization -1
  • Aristocracy +1
  • Innovativeness -1
  • Stability -1

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1554
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1554)
unless prevented by
Action B of 3009 - The Act of Supremacy for England

Description

In 1554 the catholic Queen Mary married Felipe of Spain, a union that opened great possibilities for both England and Spain. Felipe was granted the title King of England by Parliament, but was not allowed to govern the country. But the imminent question of importance was over religion. The Act of Supremacy had given clerical control to the monarch, but the people of England were sundered over religion. Catholics demanded papal authority, while protestant wanted liberal clerical laws. Mary chose to throw in her lot with the fanatical Catholics, and a wave of terror commenced earning her the nickname 'Bloody Mary'. How will we act?

Actions

A. Reinstate Papal power over Church of England

  • Change religion to catholic
  • Innovativeness -3
  • +3 missionaries
  • Gain a royal marriage with Spain
  • +50 relations with Spain
  • +100 relations with Papal States
  • Stability -2

B. Make Catholicism the most favored religion

  • Innovativeness -1
  • +1 missionaries
  • +25 relations with Spain
  • +50 relations with Papal States
  • Stability -1

C. Confirm religious freedom for all

England — Not random

Will happen on November 18, 1558
unless prevented by
Action B of 164263 - The Nine Days' Queen for England

Description

According to John Foxe's legendary account of his death, Edward VI's last words were: ''I am faint, Lord have mercy upon me, and take my spirit.'' The premature end of the life of England's first Protestant king had been foreseen by many, and with the martyrdom of that other great Protestant zealot, Thomas Cranmer, in 1556, the short-lived Anglican experiment seemed forever at an end, hastened by the ascension of the staunchly-Catholic Princess Mary in July 1553. In many ways, Mary Tudor was a complete disaster as Queen - not only did her failed marriage to the King of Spain result in many Englishmen beginning to view their ancient kingdom as nothing more than the northernmore outpost of the Habsburg empire, but the domestic policies of 'Bloody Mary' resulted in hundreds of innocent Protestants being burnt at the stake. Despite Mary's indisputable claim to the throne as Henry VIII's eldest legitimate child, many people had wondered whether 'Queen Jane' had not been a better idea afterall. In the end, however, the one thing which threatened to thrust the people of England further into darkness had, in fact, brought them back into the light: the apparent birth of a child in November 1558 - the heir to a combined Anglo-Spanish empire - turned out to be a fatal tumour. Mary died on the 17th of the month, the throne passing to the last-surviving child of Henry VIII, the Protestant Elizabeth: England's Golden Age had begun.

Actions

A. God Save Queen Elizabeth!

  • Global revolt risk -3 for 12 months
  • Stability +2
  • +10 victory points

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on November 18, 1558
unless prevented by
Action A of 164263 - The Nine Days' Queen for England

Description

After Queen Jane's successful usurpation and coronation in 1553, Mary's chances of ascending her half-brother's throne became slimmer by the day. Despite several low-key revolts in her name, successive miscarriages by various Catholic nobles and a failed marriage proposal to the future King of Spain resulted only in Mary further alienating herself from the people of England. Living in almost complete isolation in the royal apartments at Windsor, Mary - guarded at all times by fervent Puritans hand-picked by the Queen - was given few diplomatic options, with letters to and from anyone known to be in anyway pro-Catholic being burnt before reaching her. For both Queens, however, the situation was a difficult one for as long as both of them lived. Despite being deeply unpopular amongst the majority of the English, Mary was the true heir to the throne, being both the eldest sister of Edward VI and daughter of Henry VIII. Jane, though firmly established as Queen and recognised as such among the Protestant powers of Europe, was a usurper, and as well as being excommunicated by the Pope, there were rumours that plans were being made to replace Jane with Mary's half-sister, the Protestant Elizabeth - a most dangerous proposition for Jane, as hitherto her one unwavering strength had been Mary's rabid Catholicism. To Parliament, the true maker and breaker of kings, the choice was a lot simpler: Jane would reign for as long as Mary lived, the crown being offered to the Princess Elizabeth upon her half-sister's death. None of the parties involved with this arrangement were particularly happy about it, but to Parliament it ensured both the Protestant Succession and the continuation of the Tudor dynasty in the male line. Legally and constitutionally the Protestant Succession of 1558 was sound - it was also considered acceptable by the majority of the English people, not to mention undoubtedly avoiding the inevitable civil war had either side taken power by force.

Actions

A. God Save Queen Elizabeth!

  • Global revolt risk -3 for 12 months
  • Stability +2
  • +10 victory points

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 90 days of April 3, 1559
Checked again every 90 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 31, 1819)

Description

It is clear that Calais is forever lost...

Actions

A. Our claims fall on deaf ears...

  • Calais will no longer be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 1 days of July 2, 1559
Checked again every 1 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after July 2, 1565)
unless prevented by
Action C of 3014 - Bloody Mary and King Felipe of England for England

Description

After the turbulance of Mary's reign, Elizabeth desired to restore stability to England and reaffirm the Protestant nature of the Church of England. At the same time, she did not want to alienate the significant number of English Catholics, and hence designed a religious settlement that appealed to both Catholic and Protestant moderates. The Elizabethian Act of Supremacy affirmed that she was the 'Supreme Governor of the Church of England', not the 'Head of the Church of England', as her father had been stylized. The Elizabethian Act of Uniformity created a single Protestant Book of Prayer, but allowed the communion to be vaguely worded, so that both Catholics and Protestants could participate. Despite the moderate tone, Parliament only passed the Act of Uniformity by a vote of 21 to 18, revealing that deep religious divides still cut through England.

Actions

A. Adopt the Act of Supremacy and the Act of Uniformity

  • Change religion to protestant
  • Stability +4
  • -200 relations with Spain
  • -50 relations with Scotland
  • -50 relations with France
  • -100 relations with Papal States
  • Innovativeness +3

B. Radicalize the Church of England and Punish the Catholics

  • Change religion to protestant
  • Stability +2
  • -150 relations with Spain
  • -100 relations with Scotland
  • -100 relations with France
  • -100 relations with Papal States
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • Global revolt risk +3 for 60 months
  • Religion in a random province changes to protestant
  • Innovativeness -1

C. Maintain the Supremacy of Rome

  • Change religion to catholic
  • Stability -1
  • +50 relations with Spain
  • +50 relations with Scotland
  • +50 relations with Papal States
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts
  • A random province revolts

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Innovativeness is at 4 or higher

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1560
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1566)

Description

In the 1550's, to navigators who habitually used a globe, it seamed obvious that there must be a more direct route to the East across the Arctic, than round the Cape of Good Hope. Most 16th century maps shown the Arctic as an open sea, but little else was known. A considerable number of northern voyages were planned in England and, to this end many trading companies were being formed. The most famous is the 'Company of Merchant Adventurers for discovery of regions, dominions, islands and places unknown.' who had as first Master the aging Sebastian Cabot.

Actions

A. We will exploit this!

  • Gain Naval Equipment Manufactory in a random province
  • +200 gold
  • +5 merchants
  • Mercantilism +1
  • Center of trade in Mecklenburg closes
  • Anglia becomes a center of trade
  • Land -1
  • Gain 3 warships in the capital province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Spain exists
  • At least one of the following must occur:
  • Spain owns Holland
  • Spain owns Zeeland
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Peasant Rebels controls Geldre
    • Peasant Rebels controls Holland
    • Peasant Rebels controls Zeeland
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • State religion is protestant
    • State religion is reformed

Will happen within 1 days of January 2, 1560
Checked again every 1 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1600)

Description

As the Dutch rebellion gathered steam, Elizabeth came under pressure to come to the aid of the Dutch. Supporting the Calvinist Dutch against the Catholic Spanish would have significantly helped Elizabeth's domestic position, but at the cost of greatly antagonizing Spain, to say nothing of the cost of the actual aid to the Dutch.

Actions

A. Support the Dutch

B. Stay Out of Continental Problems

  • Stability -1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Event 21045 - English Support for the Dutch Rebels for England has already occurred
  • Netherlands exists
  • Netherlands and Spain are at war
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • State religion is protestant
    • State religion is reformed

Will happen within 1 days of January 2, 1560
Checked again every 1 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1600)

Description

The formal declaration of independence by the United Provinces brings a predictably harsh response from the Spanish, in the form of open warfare. Elizabeth would come under pressure to step up assistance to the Dutch, both to help out coreligionists and to ensure that a rival power does not dominate the Dutch Provinces.

Actions

A. Step Up Aid to the Dutch

B. Leave the Dutch to Their Own Devices

  • Stability -1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Huguenots exists
  • Huguenots and France are at war
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • State religion is protestant
    • State religion is reformed
  • The following must not occur:
    • Huguenots and England are at war

Will happen within 1 days of April 2, 1562
Checked again every 1 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1600)

Description

With the Huguenots of France having essentially declared independence from France, Elizabeth would have come under domestic pressure to support the Protestants across the Channel against the Catholic French.

Actions

A. Support the Huguenots

B. We Learned Our Lesson - Stay Out of France

  • Stability -1
  • -25 relations with Huguenots

England — Not random

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1566
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1573)

Description

The year 1571 saw the creation of the London Stock Exchange. Although small in importance and with limited trading in the 16th and 17th centuries, it would grow and gradually overcome its Amsterdam competitor and prove to be the most active stock market in 18th century Europe, boosting the English trade, manufacturing and economy as a whole. England would then benefit from an easy and reliable access to credit.

Actions

A. Expand Loan Market

  • Size of loans changed to 400 ducats
  • Gain Refinery in a random province
  • +8% inflation
  • Stability +1

B. Issue Strict Control

  • Gain Refinery in a random province
  • -5% inflation
  • Stability +2

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on February 9, 1569
unless prevented by
Action B of 3077 - The Time of the Regents for Scotland

Description

Queen Elizabeth I sought to bring about a religious settlement with the objective of establishing in England a protestant Anglican Church. History records that her task was accomplished with the minimum of persecution (just the right amount of persecution perhaps?). Things however began to fray around the edges when Mary Queen of Scots fled to England, seemingly because the Scots got fed up with her mismanagement of Scottish affairs. The problem for Elizabeth I was that Mary was a catholic claimant to the English throne and therefore more than a bit of an embarrassment. So Elizabeth I locked Mary away in various castles. Mary became the centre of numerous conspiracies to overthrow the 'upstarts' who had displaced the ancient aristocracy. The basic idea was to marry Mary to Norfolk, England's only Duke. This combination represented a serious threat to Elizabeth I but Norfolk seemed undecided and continued to delay until Elizabeth I invited him to London whereupon she locked him in the Tower. Elizabeth I had correctly suspected that the Earls of Northumberland, Westmorland and Cumberland were involved in the conspiracy and accordingly invited them to London. The Earls guessed their accommodation would be the Tower and opted instead for a rebellion which began on the 9 November 1569. There was some popular support. The Catholic faith had survived in the North and there was real resentment against the extension of Tudor domination and Elizabeth I. The Earl of Northumberland did muster his troops in Richmond on the 16 November offering great wages to all who came forth and burning for those who did not. On 28 November the annoyed Earl of Northumberland returned with 1000 horsemen and 'spoiled' the town. Around the 23 November a few wealthy inhabitants willingly joined the rebellion (just as it neared collapse). This defection did not go unnoticed and this time the other side led by Lord Willoughby ransacked the surrounding countryside. Sir George was appointed provost marshal and martial law was declared (except of course for the wealthy that was exempt). Elizabeth I ordered that 700 of the riffraff be executed (the wealthy would forfeit their estates to help fund the Crown's costs), 200 of these were to be from or around Richmond. On the 8 January the provost marshal arrived. Questioning of the prisoners began and on the 10 January the executions were carried out. How many were actually executed is not known but seemingly it was a smaller number, perhaps around 57, 12 of whom were from Richmond. The decade after the Rebellion was a difficult period for Catholics who faced constant persecution. Religious meetings were held in secret away from the eyes of unfriendly informants. It seems however that the few gentry who were accused in court of holding Catholic beliefs were the 'mere tip of a great pyramid' which represented a hidden underground movement.

Actions

A. Keep Norfolk in the Tower and smash the rebels

  • Northumberland revolts
  • Yorkshire revolts
  • Lancashire revolts
  • Stability +1

B. Keep Norfolk in the Tower and start to negotiate

  • Northumberland revolts
  • Aristocracy +1

C. Release Norfolk

  • Aristocracy +2
  • Stability -1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Spain exists
  • None of the following must occur:
    • England and Spain are allied
    • Spain is a vassal of England
    • England is a vassal of Spain
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • The following must not occur:
      • State religion is catholic
    • England and Spain are at war
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Spain owns Jalisco
    • Spain owns Saltillo
    • Spain owns Michoacán
    • Spain owns Zacatecas
    • Spain owns Yarumal
    • Spain owns Azuay
    • Spain owns Ayacucho
    • Spain owns Cuzco
    • Spain owns Guyana
    • Spain owns Potosi
    • Spain owns Mato Grosso
    • Spain owns Tucuman

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1570
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1577)

Description

As England and Spain became rivals, England turned to privateering as a means of damaging Spain. The most prominent among these privateers was Sir Francis Drake. England can choose to support his privateering adventures, balancing occasional infusions of cash from plundered Spanish galleons with earning the enmity of Spain. On the other hand, England can employ Drake as an explorer instead.

Actions

A. Employ Drake as a Privateer

B. Employ Drake as an Explorer

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Connaught
    • Own Ulster
    • Own Meath
    • Own Munster
    • Own Leinster

Will happen within 1000 days of January 2, 1570
Checked again every 1000 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1600)

Description

By the mid-16th century, the English policy of ruling Ireland indirectly and from a distance was believed to be a failure. The dissolution of the monastaries in Ireland accentuated religious and cultural differences. Risings in Offaly and Leix convinced the government that the Irish were incorrigible and could not be trusted. An alternate policy was to be followed: the Irish were to be removed. The process of clearing the Irish out to make room for English settlers, known as plantations, began in 1556 with the clearances of Offaly and Leix, which were renamed Queen's County and King's County. The process of plantation soon spread through Ireland, and caused both misery and outrage, and became a long-standing Irish grievance against English rule. However, it did not get rid of the Irish, only impoverish them.

Actions

A. Displace the Irish

  • Revolt risk value in Connaught +2
  • Revolt risk value in Ulster +2
  • Revolt risk value in Meath +2
  • Revolt risk value in Leinster +2
  • Revolt risk value in Munster +2
  • -500 population in Connaught
  • -500 population in Ulster
  • -500 population in Meath
  • -500 population in Leinster
  • -500 population in Munster
  • Stability -1

England — Not random

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1573
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1588)

Description

Sir Francis Walsingham was Queen Elizabeth's Private Secretary. His main achievement was the perfect organization of a secret service and spying network that proved extremely efficient in aborting all conspiracies against the Queen's life and all other political and diplomatic plots. Extremely anti-Spanish, he was also the protector of Drake and financed most of the famous privateer early expeditions against the Iberian power.

Actions

A. Let him become our Spymaster!

  • Gain a royal marriage with -1
  • Gain a royal marriage with -1
  • Gain a royal marriage with -1
  • Gain a royal marriage with -1
  • Gain a royal marriage with -1
  • Gain a royal marriage with -1
  • -100 relations with Spain
  • -100 relations with France
  • -200 gold
  • Stability +1

B. No I do not trust him!

  • Innovativeness -1

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on August 10, 1573
unless prevented by
Action B of 21037 - Elizabeth's Support for the Privateering of Sir Francis Drake for England

Description

In 1572 and 1573, Sir Francis Drake and a small group of Englishmen, assisted by escaped slaves known as Cimaroons, raided along the Mexican coast. In a stunning coup, they captured a large mule train laden with gold and silver inbound to Nombre de Dios, and gained an incredible amount of treasure.

Actions

A. Plunder? What Plunder?

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Ungava has been discovered by Europeans

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1576
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1594)

Description

Always seeking the North-West passage, the English explorers chose to follow roads more to north in order to sail round Canada, thus thinking they will reach China. Historically, Martin Frobisher was the first to make serious explorations bringing the discovery of the bay which bears its name and some isles of current Nunavut.

Actions

A. It is a first step

  • Ungava will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Wabana has been discovered by Europeans

Will happen within 30 days of March 6, 1578
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 2, 1583)

Description

Gone seeking the North-West passage, some explorers were deviated of their road during the journey. These risks of the Sea could have unexpected consequences, thus Gilbert reached Newfoundland which he took possession for the English Crown.

Actions

A. The chance makes the things sometimes well!

  • Gander will be considered a national province
  • Placentia will be considered a national province
  • Wabana will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on September 29, 1580
unless prevented by
Action B of 21037 - Elizabeth's Support for the Privateering of Sir Francis Drake for England

Description

In 1577, Sir Francis Drake was commissioned to sail to the western coast of the Americas to seek treasure and spices. After passing the Strait of Magellan, he caught the Spanish completely by surprise. For months, Drake sailed up and down the Pacific coast of the Americas, sacking towns like Lima and Valparaiso, and seizing the galleon 'Cacafuego', with its large cargo of treasure. Drake then crossed the Pacific and returned home to England.

Actions

A. Plunder? What Plunder?

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Own Chesapeake

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1585
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after June 2, 1592)

Description

During the search of the the North-West passage, English were interested in discovering the remainder of North America. Historically, the first attempt at colonization was that of Sir Grenville who, accompanied by Cavendish, tried without success to create a settlement in Virginia.

Actions

A. Let's try!

  • Chesapeake will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Caniapiscau has been discovered by Europeans

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1585
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1598)

Description

Seeking the North-West passage, the English explorers advanced towards North. Historically, John Davis managed to reach lattitude 70.

Actions

A. Always further

  • Belle Isle will be considered a national province
  • Caniapiscau will be considered a national province
  • Nain will be considered a national province
  • Anticosti will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Will happen within 60 days of May 2, 1585
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after August 2, 1585)

Description

In 1584, Sir Walter Raleigh, a veteran of wars in France and a favourite of Queen Elizabeth, was authorized to undertake the foundation of a colony in North America. Barred from voyaging to North America, he sent several associates to scout a suitable area for settlement. The following year, the first effort was made to plant a colony on Roanoke Island on the Carolina coast. However, the colonists arrived too late to plant crops, rapidly grew disinterested, alientated the natives, and left the following year with Sir Francis Drake when the latter visited the colony.

Actions

A. Send Forth the Colonists

  • +1 colonists

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on July 2, 1586
unless prevented by
Action B of 21037 - Elizabeth's Support for the Privateering of Sir Francis Drake for England

Description

In 1585 and early 1586, Sir Francis Drake, operating with letters of marque from Elizabeth, conducted a series of operations that electrified England and infuriated Spain. He raided Vigo, the Canaries, and the Cape Verde Islands, then crossed the Atlantic and attacked Hispaniola and Cartagena. He returned to England with a vast amount of plunder.

Actions

A. Plunder? What Plunder?

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on February 9, 1587
unless prevented by
Action B of 3077 - The Time of the Regents for Scotland

Description

Born in 1542, six days before the death of her father, Mary Stuart is crowned Queen of Scotland in her infancy. Raised in Catholic France and married at fifteen to the heir of the French throne in alliance against the Protestant English. She returned to Scotland only after the death of her husband in 1560

Actions

A. Behead her!

  • -150 relations with France
  • -150 relations with Spain
  • -150 relations with Papal States
  • Global revolt risk +2 for 12 months
  • Stability +1

B. Let her live imprisoned though

  • -100 relations with France
  • -100 relations with Spain
  • -50 relations with Papal States
  • Stability -1

C. Set her free, but send her to the Guise in France

  • +50 relations with France
  • +50 relations with Spain
  • +50 relations with Papal States
  • Stability -3

England — Not random

Will happen within 60 days of May 2, 1587
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after August 2, 1587)

Description

In 1587, Raleigh again attempted to plant a colony in North America. Colonists were dispatched to Chesapeake Bay, but ended up again on Roanoke Island. The Spanish Armada prevented any supply ships from reaching the colony for three years. By the time ships were able to return, the colony and the colonists had completely disappeared. No trace of them was to be found. At the same time, Raleigh was also involved in the Irish Plantations, sending colonists to his lands in the south of Ireland, and helped to popularize tobacco, which increased interest in further colonial efforts in North America.

Actions

A. Send Forth the Colonists

  • +1 colonists

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Massachusetts has been discovered by Europeans
    • Manhattan has been discovered by Europeans
    • Chesapeake has been discovered by Europeans
  • The following must not occur:
    • Land is at 5 or higher

Will happen within 100 days of January 2, 1589
Checked again every 100 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1605)

Description

In 1589, Richard Hakluyt published the 'Principall Navigations, Voiages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation' in an attempt to persuade England to explore and colonize the lands across the Atlantic and beyond. Later he publicized the idea of the North-West Passage, and was an advisor to the new East India Company in 1600. His work helped raise the profile of colonial efforts and increased their popularity.

Actions

A. Our Destiny is Across the Atlantic

  • +3 colonists
  • Trade tech investment: +200

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on July 30, 1589

Description

In 1588, Felipe II of Spain, tired of constant attacks to his fleets, cities and colonies by English corsairs, and outraged by the help lend by Elizabeth to the Dutch protestants at war against him, decided to send a powerful fleet to invade England. Bad leadership, terrible storms and superior English naval tactics and cannons, turned the expedition into a disaster. The crucial point of the expedition, the embarkment of the Tercios of Alessandro Farnese, the Duke of Parma, near Calais, could not be achieved. The return trip was a nightmare due to bad weather and diseases, and almost half of the fleet was lost in the coasts of Ireland. It was a disastrous loss, but not a crippling one, as most of the ships lost were armed merchants and Mediterranean galleases. The Atlantic fleet was largely intact and under repair at the Northern ports of Spain. It was an opportunity too good to pass of leading a fatal blow to the Spanish naval power. But for England it was difficult to quickly obtain financing for such an expensive enterprise, and so the goals were expanded to attract new investors. The fleet was to destroy the Spanish ships under repair, to invade Portugal to trigger a rebellion and instate a Portuguese claimant in the throne, to capture the Azores, and to capture also the Spanish treasure fleet to compensate the expenses for a financially troubled England. Drake and Norris were put in command, but while the destruction of the Spanish fleet was the main goal to the Queen and Privy Council, it was the treasure fleet the foremost goal to the expedition participants. As a result the expedition was a disaster of a similar magnitude to the Spanish armada. Nothing of substance was achieved, and a military defeat at Lisbon, diseases and storms, decimated the fleet, that it is said to have lost 10,000 men. Despite the grave losses, it was worse the missed opportunity, as the Spanish fleet recovered and in the next decade dominated again the seas, shipping three times more gold than the previous decades, while England suffered a chain of defeats: the repulse of Effingham in Azores in 1591, the disastrous raid to Puerto Rico and Panama in 1595, also with great loss of lives, including Hawkins and Drake, the landing of the Spaniards in Cornwall in 1595, and the failure of the Islands Voyage to Azores by Essex in 1597. As a result, James I would seek peace with Spain in the same terms offered by Felipe II prior to the Spanish Armada.

Actions

A. They were sitting ducks

  • -150 gold
  • Lose 2500 troops in a random province
  • Stability -1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • None of the following must occur:
    • State religion is catholic
    • State religion is counterreform
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Connaught
    • Own Ulster
    • Own Meath
    • Own Munster
    • Own Leinster

Will happen within 60 days of January 2, 1592
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1599)

Description

Hugh O'Neill lived in England in the 1560s. He served the government in the 1580s but in 1594 rebelled. Dissatisfied with the English government's persistent policy of playing the chiefs against one another, O'Neill was also angered by the English refusal to restore the lands granted to his grandfather. At last he formed an alliance with the other Irish chiefs and sought aid against Protestant England from Catholic Spain. He achieved something like unity among his allies and, after 1595, defeated some of Queen Elizabeth's best commanders in Ireland. O'Neill was defeated while attempting to join a Spanish force that arrived at Kinsale in 1601. His Irish allies dispersed, and O'Neill retreated to Ulster. In 1603 he made peace with the English, surrendering his tribal authority. King James I later pardoned him.

Actions

A. We are not amused!

  • Ulster revolts
  • Ulster revolts
  • Connaught revolts
  • Connaught revolts
  • Munster revolts
  • -150 relations with Spain
  • Stability +1

England — Not random

Will happen on January 2, 1593

Description

English poet dramatist and actor William Shakespeare is often called the English national poet and considered by many to be the greatest dramatist of all time. His plays written in the late 16th and early 17th centuries for a small repertory theatre are now performed and read more often and in more countries than ever before. The prophecy of his great contemporary the poet and dramatist Ben Jonson that Shakespeare 'was not of an age but for all time' has been fulfilled.

Actions

A. OK

  • Stability +1
  • Infrastructure tech investment: +250

England — Not random

Will happen within 200 days of January 2, 1595
Checked again every 200 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1595)

Description

In 1595, Raleigh personally led an expedition to the Orinoco River in South America, in the hopes of finding El Dorado. The expedition was a disappointment, and Raleigh came home empty-handed. He increasingly fell out of favour, and was imprisoned by James I in 1603, and was executed in 1618 after another failed expedition to the Orinoco.

Actions

A. Raleigh Sails in Search of Gold

  • +1 colonists
  • -25 relations with Spain

England — Not random

Will happen on July 16, 1596
unless prevented by
Action B of 285053 - Antonio Perez for Spain
Action B of 285054 - Rebellion in Aragon for Spain

Description

Antonio Perez was a Secretary General for Felipe II of Spain. Licencious and corrupt, yet extremely clever and efficient, his dealings finally caught up with him after he ordered the execution of a rival. Investigated and condemned for corruption and murder, he managed to escape to France and later to England, were he was well received by Elizabeth. In his desire of revenge against Felipe, Antonio Perez treasoned his own country, helping Elizabeth in her fights against Spain. The attack on Cadiz by Howard in 1596 was helped by the insider information provided by him. He even traced plans for an invasion of Naples by England. However after the disaster of the English fleet that attacked the Azores, Antonio Perez lost the Queen's favour and returned to Paris. He nevertheless continued writing libels against Felipe II, contributing to his black legend.

Actions

A. Use the information and attack

B. Now is not a good time

  • +25 relations with Spain

England — Not random

Will happen within 60 days of January 2, 1598
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1604)

Description

Elizabeth's popularity began to wane towards the end of her reign. The war with Spain dragged on inconclusively. The parliament became less tractable and began to object to the abuse of the royally granted monopolies, which was used to reward her favorites and tolerate considerable corruption. A last Golden speech to Parliament in 1601 reaffirmed her love for her subjects, but it came in the context of a bitter clash over royal monopolies, which she ceased from.

Actions

A. Cancel them!

  • Mercantilism -2
  • Innovativeness -1
  • -200 gold
  • Stability -1

B. Strengthen them!

  • Mercantilism +1
  • Centralization +1
  • +100 gold

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch James I is active
  • None of the following must occur:
    • Event 276021 - The Union of the Crowns for Scotland has already occurred
    • England is a vassal of Scotland
    • Scotland and England are allied
    • Scotland and England are at war

Will happen within 90 days of March 25, 1603
Checked again every 90 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after March 28, 1625)
unless prevented by
Action A, B of 276021 - The Union of the Crowns for Scotland

Description

Elizabeth I fell ill in February 1603, suffering from frailty and insomnia. After a period of distressing reflection, on 24 March she died. The will of Henry VIII declared that his daughter Elizabeth was to be succeeded by the descendants of his younger sister, Mary Tudor, Duchess of Suffolk, rather than by the Scottish descendants of his elder sister, Margaret Tudor. However, if the rules of male primogeniture were upheld and the successor James VI, King of Scots, would become the legitimate successor on the throne of England, there were other male alternative heirs but none of them pressed their claims. Still being in Scotland at that time, James VI was proclaimed King of England as James I a few hours after Elizabeth's death by a Council of Accession.

Actions

A. Unite the countries in a Great Britain

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Scotland exists
    • All of the following must occur:
      • The following must not occur:
        • Scotland exists
      • At least one of the following must occur:
        • Own The Highlands
        • Own The Grampians
        • Own Lothian
        • Own Strathclyde

Effects

  • Flag graphics extension set to "Union"
  • Conditions:
    • The following must not occur:
      • England is a vassal of Scotland
    Gain Scotland as vassals
  • Grant independence to Scotland
  • Cede The Highlands to Scotland
  • Cede The Grampians to Scotland
  • Cede Lothian to Scotland
  • Cede Strathclyde to Scotland
  • Global revolt risk +2 for 24 months
  • +200 relations with Scotland
  • Event 276021 - The Union of the Crowns for Scotland will never fire
  • Event 164112 - The plan for a united Britain for England is triggered immediately

B. Rule them independently

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Scotland exists
    • All of the following must occur:
      • The following must not occur:
        • Scotland exists
      • At least one of the following must occur:
        • Own The Highlands
        • Own The Grampians
        • Own Lothian
        • Own Strathclyde

Effects

  • Stability +1
  • Grant independence to Scotland
  • Cede The Highlands to Scotland
  • Cede The Grampians to Scotland
  • Cede Lothian to Scotland
  • Cede Strathclyde to Scotland
  • +300 relations with Scotland
  • Gain a royal marriage with Scotland
  • Event 276021 - The Union of the Crowns for Scotland will never fire
  • Event 276005 - The Union of the Crowns for Scotland is triggered immediately

C. Scotland belongs to the Stuarts

Conditions

  • None of the following must occur:
    • Scotland exists
    • Own The Highlands
    • Own The Grampians
    • Own Lothian
    • Own Strathclyde

Effects

  • The Highlands will be considered a claim province
  • The Grampians will be considered a claim province
  • Lothian will be considered a claim province
  • Strathclyde will be considered a claim province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • None of the following must occur:
    • State religion is catholic
    • State religion is counterreform

Will happen within 30 days of November 6, 1605
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1605)

Description

A plot to blow up the King and the Houses of Parliament has been discovered! The conspirators, led by Guy Fawkes and Robert Catesby, hid barrels of gunpowder below the Houses of Parliament and planned to detonate them when the Houses were in session with the King attending. Their goal was to seize control of the government and restore England to Catholicism. The conspirators will undoubtedly be executed, but how should we react towards Catholics as a whole?

Actions

A. Punish all Catholics!

  • Stability +1
  • Global revolt risk +5 for 12 months
  • Innovativeness -3
  • A random province converts to the state religion
  • A random province converts to the state religion
  • -100 relations with Papal States
  • -100 relations with Spain
  • -100 relations with France

B. Punish only the obvious conspirators

  • Stability -3
  • Innovativeness +1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Massachusetts

Will happen within 30 days of December 19, 1606
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1614)

Description

After several failures, England tried to build perennial settlements on the ground of the New World. At the beginning of the XVII century - at the same time as France - Virginia Company sent an expedition leaded by John Smith on, from now on, the famous site of Jamestown.

Actions

A. The start of a great story

  • Chesapeake will be considered a national province
  • Powhatan will be considered a national province
  • Sebago will be considered a national province
  • Connecticut will be considered a national province
  • Massachusetts will be considered a national province
  • Penobscot will be considered a national province
  • Bangor will be considered a national province
  • Micmac will be considered a national province
  • Acadie will be considered a national province
  • Nova Scotia will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Minto has been discovered by Europeans
    • Attawapiskat has been discovered by Europeans

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1607
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1611)

Description

The search of the passage led the English explorers to make large discoveries in the Far North. Historically, most beautiful among all was that of Henry Hudson who discovered the bay which bears his name.

Actions

A. Always further

  • Nain will be considered a national province
  • Torngat will be considered a national province
  • Ungava will be considered a national province
  • Minto will be considered a national province
  • Chisasibi will be considered a national province
  • Attawapiskat will be considered a national province
  • Winisk will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Powhatan

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1607
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1624)

Description

After the discovery of the North-American territories, the first English colonies were not long in being set up. The religious intolerance - which pushed persecuted people to exile - and the demographic pressure related to the enclosures movement attracted many colonists and allowed a fast development of the settlements. Historically, Virginia became one of the principal states of the USA, providing many presidents such as James Madison.

Actions

A. First settlement

  • Chesapeake will be considered a national province
  • Powhatan will be considered a national province
  • Shenandoah will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • The following must not occur:
    • Land is at 5 or higher

Will happen within 1 days of January 2, 1610
Checked again every 1 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1620)

Description

From the early 1600s, various companies were granted charters by the Crown for colonial and trading purposes. Chartered companies like the Newfoundland Company, the Bermuda Company, and the famous two Virginia Companies heralded an age of substantial colonization and overseas expansion.

Actions

A. Grant the Charters of the Colonial Companies

  • Land -1
  • +4 colonists
  • +2 merchants
  • Infrastructure tech investment: +250

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Nain has been discovered by Europeans
    • Ungava has been discovered by Europeans

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1612
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after June 2, 1616)

Description

The Hudson's expedition opened the way for other explorers. Thus, Button explored Hudson Bay in detail without managing to find a passage towards the West.

Actions

A. Always further

  • Nain will be considered a national province
  • Torngat will be considered a national province
  • Ungava will be considered a national province
  • Minto will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Savannah
    • Own Carolina
    • Own Santee
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Susquehanna
    • Own Delaware
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Catskill
    • Own Adirondak
    • Own Sebago
    • Own Connecticut
    • Own Massachusetts
    • Own Penobscot

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1615
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1620)

Description

When the English colonists arrived in America they immediately met Native Americans. Slowly they pressed the Natives back and conquered more land to settle. But they did not manage to subjugate the Native American, whom moved deeper into their vast continent. More or less from the outset the colonists where plagued by indian raids, pillaging and burning their farms and hamlets. The Anglo-French and Anglo-Spanish competition did not make the things easier for the colonists as the French and the Spaniards induced the Natives to raid and sometimes provided guns and leadership. In this situation His Majesty's Government in London had two possibilities. Either to invest in a perimeter defense of forts and garrisons or let the colonials form into militias and solve the defense on their own. The first solution was costly and London rarely viewed it a viable option. However the price London had to pay was a growing self-assurance among the colonists, a self-assurance that would become a serious problem in 1773.

Actions

A. Leave it to the Colonial Militia

  • Stability +1

B. Invest in expensive Perimeter Defense

  • Event 3346 - Native Raids for England will never fire
  • -600 gold
  • Fortress level in a random province in North America +1
  • Fortress level in a random province in North America +1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Connaught
    • Own Ulster
    • Own Meath
    • Own Munster
    • Own Leinster
  • None of the following must occur:
    • State religion is catholic
    • State religion is counterreform

Will happen within 10 days of July 2, 1615
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1640)

Description

Early in the 17th century the process of plantation reached its peak of intensity in Ulster, where not only was the settler population the highest vis-a-vis the native Irish, but the settlers were Scottish Presbyterians, who were particularly opposed to the Catholic Irish. The result was a bitterly divided Ulster that was increasingly unlike the rest of Ireland. Meanwhile, the Ulster Plantation became one more grievance against the English.

Actions

A. Begin the Ulster Plantation

  • +2000 population in Ulster
  • Religion in Ulster changes to reformed
  • +2 base tax value in Ulster
  • Revolt risk value in Ulster -1
  • Revolt risk value in Connaught +1
  • Revolt risk value in Meath +1
  • Revolt risk value in Leinster +1
  • Revolt risk value in Munster +1

B. Hold Back the Scottish Presbyterians

  • Stability -2

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Stability is at 0 or higher
  • Innovativeness is at 2 or higher

Will happen within 360 days of April 2, 1617
Checked again every 360 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after September 30, 1620)

Description

The scot John Napier published in 1614 the book 'Mirifici logarithmorum canonis descriptio' in which he introduced for the first time the logarithms. The englishman Henry Briggs translated the work into english and helped to propagate the logarithmic. The use of logarithms helps to perform arduous arithmetical operations, substituting multiplications and divisions by additions and substractions. One of the first scientists to realise the importance of logarithms was Johannes Kepler, who used them in his astronomical calculations. Soon the logarithms became a widespread tool in mathematics, astronomy and, by the 18th and 19th century, in economics as well.

Actions

A. Interesting!

  • Infrastructure tech investment: +50

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Own Massachusetts
  • The following must not occur:
    • State religion is reformed

Will happen within 1000 days of January 2, 1620
Checked again every 1000 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1635)

Description

As religious turmoil continued to plague England into the 17th century, some Puritans decided to emigrate to the New World in order to practice their religion freely. These emigrants were the foundation of the Plymouth Colony and the Massachusetts Bay Company, and shaped the politics and society of that region for decades.

Actions

A. The Puritans Found Their Religious Colony

  • +1000 population in Connecticut
  • +2500 population in Massachusetts
  • Religion in Connecticut changes to reformed
  • Religion in Massachusetts changes to reformed
  • -500 population in Midlands
  • -500 population in Anglia

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Bangor
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Bangor has been discovered by Europeans
      • All of the following must occur:
        • Own Penobscot
        • The following must not occur:
          • Penobscot has religion pagan

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1620
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1639)

Description

After the discovery of the North-American territories, the first English colonies were not long in being set up. The religious intolerance which pushed persecuted people to exile - and the demographic pressure related to the enclosures movement attracted many colonists and allowed a fast development of the settlements. Historically, the State of Maine was created only in 1820. Its territories were part of Massachussets before.

Actions

A. Good!

  • Bangor will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Massachusetts
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Massachusetts has been discovered by Europeans
      • At least one of the following must occur:
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Sebago
          • The following must not occur:
            • Sebago has religion pagan
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Connecticut
          • The following must not occur:
            • Connecticut has religion pagan
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Penobscot
          • The following must not occur:
            • Penobscot has religion pagan

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1620
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1639)

Description

After the discovery of the North-American territories, the first English colonies were not long in being set up. The religious intolerance which pushed persecuted people to exile - and the demographic pressure related to the enclosures movement attracted many colonists and allowed a fast development of the settlements. Historically, the first colonists were the Pilgrim fathers who came on board of the Mayflower in 1620, and establishing the famous habit of Thanksgiving.

Actions

A. Good!

  • Massachusetts will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • England owns Connecticut
    • England owns Massachusetts

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1620
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1640)

Description

In 1620, Sir Frederick Gorges incorporated the Council for New England, and made settlements in Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts. One of the contracts issued was the Pierce Patent of 1621, which gave the Mayflower colonists permission settle in New England. Massachusetts settlers, acting under the Council for New England, competing with the Dutch, established settlements at Hartford (1633), Windsor and Saybrook (1635), and Wethersfield (1636).

Actions

A. Support Colonial Efforts in New England

  • +2 colonists

England — Not random

Will happen within 30 days of January 3, 1620
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1665)
unless prevented by
Action B of 3343 - Colonial Defense for England

Description

The settlement of a growing number of white people in the colonies brought discontent and hatred both among the natives and the settlers. The English colonists would ignore the natives as long as they could grab their land and would suppress, on false pretexts, all attempts at reaction and redress of wrongs. The French were more conciliatory towards natives, trying to convert and assimilate them into their religion, realm and culture. However, they also sometimes gained the enmity of powerful tribes (such as the Mohawks) by their interference in Indian tribal conflicts and fur trade control. Once in a while, hard-pressed tribe would go on rampage and raid nearby settlements with total savagery, matched equally by the white reprisals.

Actions

A. Oh no!

  • Create a colonial revolt in a random province
  • Create a colonial revolt in a random province
  • Create a colonial revolt in a random province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Penobscot
    • The following must not occur:
      • Penobscot has religion pagan
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Penobscot has been discovered by Europeans
      • At least one of the following must occur:
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Sebago
          • The following must not occur:
            • Sebago has religion pagan
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Massachusetts
          • The following must not occur:
            • Massachusetts has religion pagan
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Bangor
          • The following must not occur:
            • Bangor has religion pagan

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1623
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1639)

Description

After the discovery of the North-American territories, the first English colonies were not long in being set up. The religious intolerance which pushed persecuted people to exile - and the demographic pressure related to the enclosures movement attracted many colonists and allowed a fast development of the settlements. Historically, New Hampshire was first under the domination of Massachussets and became a royal province until the end of the XVIIth century. It was the first State to declare independence from England in 1774.

Actions

A. Good!

  • Penobscot will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Spain exists
  • The following must not occur:
    • England and Spain are at war

Will happen within 30 days of June 2, 1623
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1623)

Description

In 1623, George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, and Charles, the Prince of Wales, travelled to Spain in hopes of cementing Anglo-Spanish relations with a marriage of the young prince to the Spanish infanta. Buckingham was snubbed by the Spanish court, and the infanta unimpressed by the juvenile and overblown antics of the prince. In addition, Spain was unwilling to marry the infanta to a protestant. Charles and Buckingham returned to England angry and full of anti-Spanish sentiment, and agitated for war. Parliament favored Buckingham and the Crown Prince, and granted James a subsidy for the purposes of making war on Spain. The failed marriage negotiations with Spain eventually led to Charles' marriage to Henrietta Maria of France.

Actions

A. Let us teach the Spanish a lesson!

  • -100 relations with Spain
  • +50 relations with France
  • Gain a temporary casus belli against Spain for 12 months
  • +100 gold

B. Let the insult pass

  • +50 relations with Spain
  • -50 relations with France
  • Monarch's diplomatic skill -2 for 12 months

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Delaware
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Delaware has been discovered by Europeans
      • At least one of the following must occur:
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Chesapeake
          • The following must not occur:
            • Chesapeake has religion pagan
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Powhatan
          • The following must not occur:
            • Powhatan has religion pagan
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Susquehanna
          • The following must not occur:
            • Susquehanna has religion pagan
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Manhattan
          • The following must not occur:
            • Manhattan has religion pagan

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1624
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1632)

Description

After the discovery of the North-American territories, the first English colonies were not long in being set up. The religious intolerance which pushed persecuted people to exile - and the demographic pressure related to the enclosures movement attracted many colonists and allowed a fast development of the settlements. Historically founded by Catholics, the colony was the object of conflicts between them and the Protestants who finally managed to take control of it.

Actions

A. Good!

  • Delaware will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Catskill
    • Own Oswego

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1624
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1664)

Description

After the discovery of the North-American territories, the first English colonies were not long in being set up. The religious intolerance which pushed persecuted people to exile - and the demographic pressure related to the enclosures movement attracted many colonists and allowed a fast development of the settlements. Historically, the site of New York was initially a Dutch possession before England does seize it after a war in 1664.

Actions

A. Good!

  • Manhattan will be considered a national province
  • Catskill will be considered a national province
  • Oswego will be considered a national province
  • Mohawk will be considered a national province
  • Onondaga will be considered a national province
  • Ticonderoga will be considered a national province
  • Adirondak will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 62 days of April 2, 1625
Checked again every 62 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after June 30, 1625)

Description

Following his rebuff by the Spanish in pursuit of the infanta, and believing that an alliance with France was necessary in the event of war with Spain, Charles, as newly crowned King of England, married Henrietta Maria. The marriage caused outrage in the parliament, because Charles, while still Prince of Wales, had sworn before both Lords and Commons that he would not marry a Catholic. In response, parliament severely curtailed Charles' military appropriations and his traditional 'tunnage and poundage' tax. The blame for Charles' marriage to Henrietta Maria, however, fell on Buckingham, who responded with an attempt to plunder Cadiz.

Actions

A. We are in his hands and must pay

  • Stability -1
  • Gain a royal marriage with France
  • -200 gold

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Event 21118 - Charles I and Henrietta Maria of France for England has already occurred
  • Spain exists
  • None of the following must occur:
    • England and Spain are at war
    • England and Spain are allied
    • Spain is a vassal of England
    • England is a vassal of Spain
    • At least one of the following must occur:
      • State religion is catholic
      • State religion is counterreform

Will happen within 45 days of August 16, 1625
Checked again every 45 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after September 30, 1625)

Description

With Charles I still angry over his rude treatment at the hands of the Spanish court and Buckingham eager to regain popularity after the marriage of Charles to Henrietta Maria, a decision was made to sack the city of Cadiz. The expedition was a costly failure. Although English troops made it ashore, they did little plundering and much drinking, and the Royal Navy proved to be in a state of shabby disrepair. Parliament, angry over the failed expedition, blamed Buckingham, and called for his impeachment. To save his minister, Charles dissolved the parliament in spite of not receiving the appropriations he needed. Sir John Eliot, a leader in Commons was placed in the tower, and Charles resorted to the largest forced loan in English history to finance his government. Twenty-Seven members of Commons were jailed for refusing to contribute to the loan, and the cost to Charles in terms of the goodwill of the merchants and the gentry were enormous.

Actions

A. Let us plunder the riches of Spain!

  • -75 relations with Spain
  • Gain a temporary casus belli against Spain for 24 months
  • +150 gold
  • Aristocracy +1
  • Trade tech investment: -250

B. We cannot afford a costly war!

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Huguenots exists
  • Event 21119 - The Raid on Cadiz for England has already occurred
  • None of the following must occur:
    • England and France are allied
    • France is a vassal of England
    • England is a vassal of France

Will happen within 90 days of March 16, 1627
Checked again every 90 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after June 16, 1627)
unless prevented by
Action B of 21119 - The Raid on Cadiz for England

Description

Eager to redeem himself after the failure of the attack on Cadiz, and taking advantage of existing antagonism towards France, Buckingham assembled a fleet of ninety ships and 10,000 men to relieve the besieged Huguenot city of La Rochelle. Like the Cadiz expedition, the La Rochelle adventure was ill-conceived and poorly executed. An already dangerously antagonized parliament was further outraged by Buckingham's latest blunder, and ultimately responded with the Petition of Right.

Actions

A. We trust our Chief Minister's judgement

  • -75 relations with France
  • +75 relations with Huguenots
  • Gain a temporary casus belli against France for 24 months
  • +10000 infantry in Anglia
  • Gain 10 warships in Anglia

B. Buckingham must be controlled

  • +25 relations with France
  • -25 relations with Huguenots

England — Not random

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1628
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1628)

Description

In 1628 the English Parliament passed the Petition of Rights. Under its terms the King could not levy any new taxes without the consent of Parliament. Furthermore soldiers could not be billeted in private homes. Martial law could not be imposed in time of peace. Finally, the Petition of Rights forbids the imprisonment of individuals without cause.

Actions

A. Sign it

  • Centralization -2
  • Aristocracy -1
  • Innovativeness +1
  • Stability -1
  • Monarch's administrative skill -2 for 60 months

B. Refuse to sign it

  • Centralization +2
  • Aristocracy +1
  • Innovativeness -1
  • Serfdom +2
  • Stability -2
  • Global revolt risk +5 for 60 months

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Madras has been discovered by Europeans
    • Coast of Coromandel has been discovered by Europeans

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1630
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1700)

Description

Reports have come in about a stretch of land bordering the Bay of Bengal that would be a good location for a trading venture. The money would need to be paid upfront in order to pursue the venture.

Actions

A. Approach the natives about purchasing the land

B. Let's invest our money on something more worthwile

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 70 days of January 2, 1630
Checked again every 70 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1700)
unless prevented by
Action B of 164600 - An Opportunity in India for England

Description

The opportunity to buy land on the coast of the Bay of Bengal was a scam. Only a small portion of the fronted money was recovered.

Actions

A. Damn!

  • +25 gold
  • -5 victory points

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Country is not at war
  • Stability is at -1 or higher
  • Innovativeness is at 2 or higher

Will happen within 3600 days of November 29, 1630
Checked again every 3600 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1670)

Description

From the first years of the 17th century on, many English scientists reached high reputation for their works. Among them there were mathematicians like Isaac Barrow (generally recognized as the founder of differential calculus) or John Wallis, physicians like William Harvey (who developed the first complete theory of the circulation of blood, believing that it was pushed throughout the body by the heart's contractions), chemists like Robert Boyle (who clearly separated chemistry from alchemy), physicists like Robert Hooke and astronomers like John Flamsteed and Edmund Halley (who encouraged Newton in his work and is famous for the comet bearing his name).

Actions

A. We have a really good group of scientists

  • Infrastructure tech investment: +50

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Connecticut
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Connecticut has been discovered by Europeans
      • At least one of the following must occur:
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Manhattan
          • The following must not occur:
            • Manhattan has religion pagan
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Catskill
          • The following must not occur:
            • Catskill has religion pagan
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Adirondak
          • The following must not occur:
            • Adirondak has religion pagan
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Sebago
          • The following must not occur:
            • Sebago has religion pagan
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Massachusetts
          • The following must not occur:
            • Massachusetts has religion pagan

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1633
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1637)

Description

After the discovery of the North-American territories, the first English colonies were not long in being set up. The religious intolerance which pushed persecuted people to exile - and the demographic pressure related to the enclosures movement attracted many colonists and allowed a fast development of the settlements.

Actions

A. Good!

  • Connecticut will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Sebago
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Sebago has been discovered by Europeans
      • At least one of the following must occur:
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Adirondak
          • The following must not occur:
            • Adirondak has religion pagan
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Connecticut
          • The following must not occur:
            • Connecticut has religion pagan
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Massachusetts
          • The following must not occur:
            • Massachusetts has religion pagan
        • All of the following must occur:
          • Own Penobscot
          • The following must not occur:
            • Penobscot has religion pagan

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1633
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1637)

Description

After the discovery of the North-American territories, the first English colonies were not long in being set up. The religious intolerance which pushed persecuted people to exile - and the demographic pressure related to the enclosures movement attracted many colonists and allowed a fast development of the settlements. Although historically explored by the French Samuel de Champlain, the area was mainly colonized by English who, starting from the States established on the maritime frontage, spread inside the lands.

Actions

A. Good!

  • Sebago will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • State religion is protestant
    • State religion is reformed

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1634
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after July 2, 1641)

Description

The 16th century saw the number of members in the House of Commons increase, while the House of Lords remained significantly smaller. The power base in Parliament shifted to the House of Commons who were well aware of the fact. Elizabeth I had a mix of determination, majestic presence and kindness towards the members of Parliament that her successors James I and his son Charles I did not. The Parliament wanted to have more said in matters about the church, justice and taxes to which the King naturally opposed. When James I tried to propose marriage of his son to Spanish, and later a French princess (both Catholic) they had enough. The Parliament of 1628 voiced the Petition of Right which forbad arrests and taxation ordered by the King. In 1629 the Parliament voted for resolutions to condemn Religious and Tax politics and the King opposed the Parliament and tried to dissolve it. Eleven years of Dictatorship ensued. In 1642 the Civil War divided the country into Cavaliers (Royalists) and Roundheads.

Actions

A. Combat the Parliament

  • Centralization +2
  • Aristocracy +2
  • Serfdom +1
  • Global revolt risk +3 for 96 months
  • +150 gold
  • Stability -1
  • Monarch's administrative skill -2 for 12 months
  • Monarch's diplomatic skill +2 for 36 months

B. Oppose the Parliament

  • Centralization +1
  • Aristocracy +1
  • Serfdom +1
  • Global revolt risk +1 for 96 months
  • Stability -1
  • Monarch's administrative skill -2 for 36 months
  • Monarch's diplomatic skill +2 for 12 months

C. Submit to the Parliament

  • Centralization -4
  • Aristocracy -2
  • Serfdom -2
  • -300 gold
  • Stability +1
  • Monarch's administrative skill -2 for 90 months

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Catawba

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1640
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1660)

Description

After the discovery of the North-American territories, the first English colonies were not long in being set up. The religious intolerance which pushed persecuted people to exile - and the demographic pressure related to the enclosures movement attracted many colonists and allowed a fast development of the settlements.

Actions

A. Good!

  • Roanoke will be considered a national province
  • Catawba will be considered a national province
  • Appalache will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Event 21030 - The Elizabethan Religious Settlement for England has already occurred
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • State religion is protestant
    • State religion is reformed
  • Centralization is at 4 or higher
  • Aristocracy is at 3 or higher

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1642
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1642)

Description

The English Civil War (1642-1648) was the result of a long power struggle between the Stuart monarchs and the Puritan-led Parliament. Intensification of royal judicial procedures (Star Chamber) and demands for taxes (1635, ship money for naval construction) was faced by Parliamentary opposition (summary of grievances in the 1641 Grand Remonstrance) and execution of royal advisors. The arrest of John Pym, the Puritan leader and the Catholic uprising in Ulster (1641) sparked the war between the Royalists and the Parliament. The decisive reform and new model army of Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658) led to the capture and execution of King Charles I (1649) and the establishment of the English Commonwealth, a military dictatorship controlled by a Lord Protector (Cromwell - 1653) and a reduced (Rump) Parliament. Following successful wars against Holland (1652-1654) and Spain (1654-1659), the monarchy would be re-established by General Monk in 1658, to the profit of Charles II Stuart (1660-1688), a fervent absolutist.

Actions

A. Puritans

  • Stability -3
  • Event 3771 - King Charles and the New Monarchy for England will never fire
  • Meath revolts
  • Leinster revolts
  • Cornwall revolts
  • Bristol revolts
  • Wales revolts
  • Northumberland revolts
  • Revolt risk value in Meath +5
  • Revolt risk value in Leinster +5
  • Revolt risk value in Cornwall +5
  • Revolt risk value in Bristol +5
  • Revolt risk value in Wales +5
  • Revolt risk value in Northumberland +5
  • +20000 infantry in the capital province
  • +5000 cavalry in the capital province
  • +5 artillery in the capital province
  • Leader Berwick becomes active
  • Leader Prince Rupert will never be active
  • Leader Prince Rupert will never be active
  • +100 relations with Netherlands
  • +100 relations with Sweden

B. Royalists

  • Stability -2
  • Event 3026 - The Commonwealth of England for England will never fire
  • Event 164045 - The Execution of King Charles for England will never fire
  • Event 276007 - The Engagement for Scotland will never fire
  • Event 3079 - The Civil War down South for Scotland will never fire
  • Event 3080 - The Civil War down South for Scotland will never fire
  • Kent revolts
  • Wessex revolts
  • Lincoln revolts
  • Midlands revolts
  • Ulster revolts
  • Lancashire revolts
  • Revolt risk value in Kent +5
  • Revolt risk value in Wessex +5
  • Revolt risk value in Lincoln +5
  • Revolt risk value in Midlands +5
  • Revolt risk value in Ulster +5
  • Revolt risk value in Lancashire +5
  • +15000 infantry in the capital province
  • +15000 cavalry in the capital province
  • +10 artillery in the capital province
  • Leader Berwick becomes active
  • Leader Prince Rupert becomes active
  • Leader Prince Rupert becomes active
  • Leader George Monck will never be active
  • Leader Cromwell will never be active
  • Leader Monck will never be active
  • +150 relations with France
  • +150 relations with Spain
  • Event 170275 - Jacques Fitz-James de Berwick for France will never fire

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Event 3025 - The English Civil War for England has already occurred
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • England owns Connecticut
    • England owns Massachusetts

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1643
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1645)

Description

In 1643, with England distracted by the Civil War, the New England colonies formed a Confederation to protect itself from Dutch and Spanish attacks.

Actions

A. New England Strengthens its Defenses

  • Fortress level in Connecticut +1
  • Fortress level in Massachusetts +1

The Pope — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on January 2, 1643

Description

Actions

A. OK

  • Leader Prince Rupert becomes active
  • Leader Prince Rupert becomes active

The Pope — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on January 2, 1648

Description

Actions

A. OK

  • Leader Berwick becomes active

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Ireland controls Connaught
  • Ireland controls Ulster
  • Ireland controls Meath
  • Ireland controls Leinster
  • Ireland controls Munster
  • None of the following must occur:
    • England and Ireland are at war
    • England and Connaught are at war
    • England and Leinster are at war
    • England and Desmond are at war
    • England and Ulster are at war
  • None of the following must occur:
    • Ireland is a vassal of England
    • Connaught is a vassal of England
    • Leinster is a vassal of England
    • Desmond is a vassal of England
    • Ulster is a vassal of England

Will happen within 5 days of January 30, 1649
Checked again every 5 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after February 16, 1649)

Description

The Irish rebels have been able to seize control of the whole of Ireland! They have declared independence which has already been recognised by many other nations! Our rule in Ireland is at an end!

Actions

A. Curses!

  • Connaught will no longer be considered a national province
  • Ulster will no longer be considered a national province
  • Meath will no longer be considered a national province
  • Leinster will no longer be considered a national province
  • Munster will no longer be considered a national province
  • -50 victory points

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on January 30, 1649
unless prevented by
Action B of 3025 - The English Civil War for England

Description

The trial of King Charles I on charges of high treason and ''other high crimes'' began on 2 January, but the King refused to enter a plea, claiming that no court had jurisdiction over a monarch. He believed that his own authority to rule had been given to him by God when he was crowned and anointed, and that the power wielded by those trying him was simply that which grew out of a barrel of gunpowder. The court, by contrast, proposed that no man is above the law. Over a period of a week, when Charles was asked to plead three times, he refused. It was then normal practice to take a refusal to plead as pro confesso: an admission of guilt, which meant that the prosecution could not call witnesses to its case. In fact, however, the trial did hear witnesses. Fifty-nine of the Commissioners signed Charles' death warrant, on 29 January 1649. After the ruling, he was led from St. James's Palace, where he was confined, to the Palace of Whitehall, where an execution scaffold had been erected in front of the Banqueting House. Famously, Charles insisted upon wearing a second vest beneath his shirt that day, so as not to shiver, thus giving the crowd the false impression of fear.
Charles I, King of England, Scotland and Ireland, was executed despite his son's efforts to save him. However, having England become a Republic, The Scottish Parliament was forced to act appointing his son, Charles II, as King of Scotland, England and Ireland on condition he accepted the Covenant, which Charles II had no option but to agree to. The refusal of the Scottish Parliament to reconsider their religious position against Anglicanism would be an excuse for Cromwell, member of the newly formed Council of State to invade Scotland. Within a year Scotland would be conquered, its Parliament abolished and the Scots forced into an incorporating union with England. Scotland would become an occupied country with Cromwellian citadels. The Parliamentary Union of 1652 and the birth of Commonwealth of Scotland, England and Ireland would however bring an uneasy peace accepted by the people for purely practical reasons.

Actions

A. Charles Stuart is dead!

  • The Highlands will be considered a claim province
  • The Grampians will be considered a claim province
  • Lothian will be considered a claim province
  • Strathclyde will be considered a claim province
  • -150 relations with France
  • -150 relations with Netherlands
  • Aristocracy -2
  • -6 diplomats
  • +2 badboy
  • Monarch Interregnum becomes active
  • Monarch Charles I will never rule

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on February 1, 1649
unless prevented by
Action A of 3025 - The English Civil War for England

Description

During the reign of Charles I England's loyalties were divided between Parliament and the King. Parliament wanted more pluralism and Protestant supremacy, whilst the King, spurred on by the influence of his French Queen, wished to revert to the supremacy of Rome and the Divine Right of Kings, or at the very least, religious freedom for all. In 1645 the New Royal Army formed by Fairfax won two important victories, at Naseby and at Langport, destroying all of Parliaments' armies. In 1646, Charles had little choice but to spread his remaining forces into 'hunt-and-destroy' parties seeking out fleeing Puritan leaders. Oxford pressed the newly formed 'New Model Army' of Oliver Cromwell, forcing them to seek refuge with the Scots, bringing the first war to a close. Charles used the time to negotiate with Parliament, spending vast sums of the Exchequer bribing moderate Parliamentarians. In the mean time, Cromwell's army began to feel their feeble relation with the Scots deteriorate. Eventually the Puritan army tried to kidnap King Charles, however, Charles escaped and used this 'vile and contemptuous habit' to his advantage. Then, Cromwell's army marched south (Aug 1647) and debated proposals of their own with the refugees of the Parliament at York. Charles took advantage of this shift of emphasis away from him to negotiate a new agreement with the Scots, again promising church reform. This agreement leads to a series of Puritan rebellions and an ambitious offensive by Cromwell's Army (Jul 1648). However, all were checked by the far more powerful Royal Army under Fairfax. The New Model Army, angry that the majority of Parliament still considered Charles as King, marched on Parliament and conducted Pride's Purge (named such since the commanding officer of the operation was Sir Thomas Pride). 45 MP's were arrested, 146 were kept out of Parliament, and only 75 were allowed in, and then only to do the Army's bidding. This Rump Parliament was ordered to set up a high court of justice in order to try Charles I for treason in the name of the people of England. Charles took action and surrounded the Cromwellian army, smashing it to dust, freeing Parliament and enforcing his will upon it. At the Great Trial of Treason (Jan 1649) hundreds of Puritan leaders were found guilty and beheaded. Oliver Cromwell then lead the minuscule remnants of his New Model Army to Hull where he was arrested by the Sheriff of York, but escaped to Sweden after offering the City of York his baggage train in exchange for his life. Cromwell later fought with distinction in the Swedish-Polish War, but was fatally wounded at Warsaw in 1656. Charles I was once again King of England, Scotland and Ireland. His promise to the Scots was never fulfilled and in March the Church of England was formally returned to the Church of Rome.

Actions

A. Be Vengeful

  • Inherit the realms of Puritans
  • Change religion to catholic
  • Religion in Midlands changes to catholic
  • Revolt risk value in Kent -5
  • Revolt risk value in Wessex -5
  • Revolt risk value in Lincoln -5
  • Revolt risk value in Midlands -5
  • Revolt risk value in Ulster -5
  • Revolt risk value in Lancashire -5
  • Centralization +3
  • Aristocracy +4
  • Innovativeness -1
  • Land +1
  • Offensive Doctrine -2
  • +200 relations with France
  • +200 relations with Scotland
  • -200 relations with Netherlands
  • -200 relations with Sweden
  • Stability -2

B. Be Merciful

  • Inherit the realms of Puritans
  • Change religion to protestant
  • Religion in Midlands changes to catholic
  • Revolt risk value in Kent -5
  • Revolt risk value in Wessex -5
  • Revolt risk value in Lincoln -5
  • Revolt risk value in Midlands -5
  • Revolt risk value in Ulster -5
  • Revolt risk value in Lancashire -5
  • Centralization +1
  • Aristocracy +2
  • Offensive Doctrine -2
  • +50 relations with France
  • +100 relations with Scotland
  • -100 relations with Netherlands
  • -50 relations with Sweden
  • Stability +1

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on February 1, 1649
unless prevented by
Action B of 3025 - The English Civil War for England

Description

Be it declared and enacted by this present Parliament and by the Authoritie of the same That the People of England and of all the Dominions and Territoryes thereunto belonging are and shall be and are hereby constituted, made, established, and confirmed to be a Commonwealth and free State And shall from henceforth be Governed as a Commonwealth and Free State by the supreame Authoritie of this Nation, the Representatives of the People in Parliament and by such as they shall appoint and constitute as Officers and Ministers under them for the good of the People and that without any King or House of Lords.

Actions

A. Sign it!

  • Inherit the realms of Royalists
  • Flag graphics extension set to "Commonwealth"
  • Culture in Wales changes to english
  • Monarch Council of State becomes active
  • Revolt risk value in Meath -5
  • Revolt risk value in Leinster -5
  • Revolt risk value in Cornwall -5
  • Revolt risk value in Bristol -5
  • Revolt risk value in Wales -5
  • Revolt risk value in Northumberland -5
  • Centralization -4
  • Aristocracy -5
  • Innovativeness +3
  • Offensive Doctrine +2
  • Stability +2

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Event 3771 - King Charles and the New Monarchy for England has already occurred
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Monarch Charles I is active
    • Monarch Charles II is active
  • None of the following must occur:

Will happen within 30 days of February 6, 1649
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after February 6, 1685)
unless prevented by
Action A of 276022 - The Union of Great Britain for Scotland

Description

James I's plan for a Union of Great Britain was continued by his successors, Charles I and Charles II. Expecially Charles I, who saw himself as the 'Godly Prince' and sought to bring the Church of Scotland into conformity with England, made the first important steps towards the political union of Britain.

Actions

A. Let's bind the destinies of our two countries

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Scotland exists
    • All of the following must occur:
      • The following must not occur:
        • Scotland exists
      • At least one of the following must occur:
        • Own The Highlands
        • Own The Grampians
        • Own Lothian
        • Own Strathclyde

Effects

  • Conditions:
    • The following must not occur:
      • England is a vassal of Scotland
    Gain Scotland as vassals
  • Grant independence to Scotland
  • Cede The Highlands to Scotland
  • Cede The Grampians to Scotland
  • Cede Lothian to Scotland
  • Cede Strathclyde to Scotland
  • The Highlands will no longer be considered a national province
  • The Grampians will no longer be considered a national province
  • Lothian will no longer be considered a national province
  • Strathclyde will no longer be considered a national province
  • Monarch's diplomatic skill +2 for 12 months
  • Monarch's administrative skill +2 for 12 months
  • Monarch's military skill +2 for 12 months
  • Event 276022 - The Union of Great Britain for Scotland will never fire
  • Event 164113 - The formation of Great Britain for England is triggered immediately

B. Scotland belongs to the Stuarts

Conditions

  • None of the following must occur:
    • Scotland exists
    • Own The Highlands
    • Own The Grampians
    • Own Lothian
    • Own Strathclyde

Effects

  • The Highlands will be considered a claim province
  • The Grampians will be considered a claim province
  • Lothian will be considered a claim province
  • Strathclyde will be considered a claim province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Connaught
    • Own Ulster
    • Own Meath
    • Own Munster
    • Own Leinster
  • Monarch Council of State is active

Will happen on September 11, 1649

Description

After the Victory of Parliament in the English Civil War, Cromwell brutally repressed the Irish, who had risen in support of Charles I. In particular, the populace of the towns of Drogheda and Wexford were massacred. This increased the hatred the Irish felt towards the English.

Actions

A. Crush the Irish

  • Revolt risk value in Connaught +1
  • Revolt risk value in Meath +1
  • Revolt risk value in Leinster +1
  • Revolt risk value in Munster +1
  • -300 population in Connaught
  • -300 population in Meath
  • -300 population in Leinster
  • -300 population in Munster

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 1 days of January 2, 1650
Checked again every 1 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1655)

Description

After a Royalist victory in the English Civil War, a significant number of hardline Puritans, who could not accept defeat and the return of the Stuarts to power, would have fled overseas and found sanctuary in the existing Puritan colonies in the New World.

Actions

A. Puritans Flee Overseas

  • +500 population in Sebago
  • +2000 population in Connecticut
  • +5000 population in Massachusetts
  • +500 population in Penobscot
  • Religion in Sebago changes to reformed
  • Religion in Connecticut changes to reformed
  • Religion in Massachusetts changes to reformed
  • Religion in Penobscot changes to reformed
  • +1 base tax value in Connecticut
  • +1 base tax value in Massachusetts
  • -1000 population in Lincoln
  • -2500 population in Anglia
  • -1000 population in Kent
  • -1 base tax value in Anglia

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Council of State is active

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1651
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1651)

Description

Oliver Cromwell, ''Captain-General and Commander-in-Chief of the Forces raised, and to be raised, within the Commonwealth of England'' promulgated the Act of Navigation in 1651. It was mostly directed against the Dutch carrier trade and provided that all goods shipped to and from England were to be transported on English ships, while also confirming the colonial exclusive policy. The Act directly caused the first Anglo-Dutch war of 1652-1654 and the second in 1665-1667. At the Peace of Breda (1667), New Amsterdam (New York) was exchanged for Surinam (Dutch Guiana) and the Act was slightly modified. It nevertheless contributed to the enormous growth in English naval and colonial trade.

Actions

A. Enact

B. The present policy is perfect

  • Stability +1

C. Ease the present policy up

  • Mercantilism -2
  • -200 gold
  • Stability -1

England — Not random

Will happen on January 2, 1651

Description

English philosopher Thomas Hobbes held that the state of nature was a state of strife and chaos which could be ended only if individuals agreed in a 'Social Contract' to give their liberty into the hands of a sovereign. The sovereign on his part was obliged to protect his subjects. Failure to do so would allow the people to seek a new ruler. Strangely enough Hobbes managed to offend both sides in the English Civil War and spent 11 years in Paris before he dared set foot in England again in 1651.

Actions

A. OK

  • Aristocracy +1

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 100 days of January 2, 1652
Checked again every 100 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1674)
unless prevented by
Action B of 186032 - Preparation of the raid on the Medway for Netherlands
Action A, B of 164107 - Raid on the Medway for England

Description

Sir, the Dutch are attempting to raid our docks! What shall we do?

Actions

A. Send the army and bombard them from our forts!

B. Send the navy and fight them!

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 100 days of January 2, 1652
Checked again every 100 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1674)
unless prevented by
Action B of 186032 - Preparation of the raid on the Medway for Netherlands
Action A, B of 164106 - Raid on the Medway for England

Description

Sir, the Dutch are attempting to raid our docks! What shall we do?

Actions

A. Send the navy and fight them!

B. Send the army and bombard them from our forts!

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Council of State is active

Will happen on March 29, 1653

Description

In naval warfare, line of battle is a tactic in which the ships of the fleet form a line, end-to-end. Its origins are traditionally ascribed to the navy of the Commonwealth of England, especially to General at Sea Robert Blake who wrote the Sailing and Fighting Instructions of 1653, but it was already used in the Action of 18 September 1639 by Dutch Lieutenant-Admiral Maarten Tromp.

The line of battle has the advantage over previous naval tactics — in which ships closed on each other for individual combat — that each ship in the line can fire its broadside without fear of hitting a friendly ship. Therefore in any given amount of time more shots can be fired by the entire fleet. Another advantage is that a relative movement of the line in relation to some part of the enemy fleet allows for a systematic concentration of fire on that part. To fend off this possibility the other fleet too can move in a line, with the result so typical for sea battle since 1675: two fleets sailing along each other or in opposite tack. A ship powerful enough to stand in the line of battle came to be known as a ''ship of the line'' (of battle) or a ''line of battle'' ship which shortened to become ''battleship''. The line is at its most effective when moving perpendicular to the axis of movement of the enemy fleet, e.g. by ''crossing the T'' or by breaking the enemy line and moving through it (e.g. Four Days Battle, Battle of Schooneveld, Battle of Trafalgar), by trying to cut off and isolate part of the enemy's line and concentrating a stronger force on it (e.g. Battle of Texel, Battle of the Saintes), or by trying to 'double up' the enemy's ships (e.g. Battle of Beachy Head). This way the enemy ships block each other's line of fire.

Actions

A. A great new tactic!

  • Naval tech investment: +250

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Council of State is active

Will happen on December 16, 1653

Description

After the dissolution of the Barebones Parliament, John Lambert put forward a new constitution known as the Instrument of Government, closely modelled on the Heads of Proposals. It made Cromwell Lord Protector for life, in order to undertake “the chief magistracy and the administration of government”. He had the power to call and dissolve parliaments but obliged under the Instrument to seek the majority vote of the Council of State. However, Cromwell's power was also buttressed by his continuing popularity among the army, which he had built up during the civil wars, and which he subsequently prudently guarded. Cromwell was sworn in as Lord Protector on 15 December 1653. The creation of the office of Lord Protector added an ominous - and to the Royalist faction, extremely useful - element of hypocrisy to the fledling republic, and seemed only to further weaken a series of parliaments already dominated by Cromwell. Conversely, the wielding of such immense power in the hands of by far the single most capable man in government meant that decisions were pushed through a lot quicker, and the nation - at home as well as abroad - had a single, iconic figurehead to swear allegiance to. Just like the Kings of old, Cromwell's image was emblazoned on all Commonwealth sterling. The only thing missing, was a crown...

Actions

A. Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of England!

  • Flag graphics extension set to "Protectorate"
  • Change religion to reformed
  • Monarch Oliver Cromwell becomes active
  • Monarch Richard Cromwell becomes active
  • Revolt risk value in a random province -1
  • Revolt risk value in a random province -1
  • Revolt risk value in a random province -1
  • Centralization +5
  • Aristocracy +3
  • Innovativeness -4
  • Offensive Doctrine +3
  • Stability -1

B. Nonsense! We are a republic!

  • Change religion to protestant
  • Centralization -4
  • Aristocracy -5
  • Offensive Doctrine -1
  • Serfdom -3
  • Stability -3
  • Event 164143 - The Coronation for England will never fire

England — Not random

Conditions

  • None of the following must occur:
    • England is a vassal of Spain
    • Spain is a vassal of England
    • Spain and England are allied
  • The following must not occur:
    • England and Netherlands are at war
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Monarch Oliver Cromwell is active
    • Monarch Richard Cromwell is active
    • Monarch John Lambert ° is active
    • Monarch Oliver I ° is active
    • Monarch Richard IV ° is active
  • Spain owns Tortuga
  • Spain controls Tortuga
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Own Barbados
      • Control Barbados
      • The following must not occur:
        • Barbados has religion pagan
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Own Puerto Rico
      • Control Puerto Rico
      • The following must not occur:
        • Puerto Rico has religion pagan
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Own St. Thomas
      • Control St. Thomas
      • The following must not occur:
        • St. Thomas has religion pagan
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Own St. Martin
      • Control St. Martin
      • The following must not occur:
        • St. Martin has religion pagan
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Own Antigua
      • Control Antigua
      • The following must not occur:
        • Antigua has religion pagan
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Own Dominica
      • Control Dominica
      • The following must not occur:
        • Dominica has religion pagan
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Own Guadeloupe
      • Control Guadeloupe
      • The following must not occur:
        • Guadeloupe has religion pagan
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Own Martinique
      • Control Martinique
      • The following must not occur:
        • Martinique has religion pagan
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Own Tobago & Trinidad
      • Control Tobago & Trinidad
      • The following must not occur:
        • Tobago & Trinidad has religion pagan
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Own Curacao
      • Control Curacao
      • The following must not occur:
        • Curacao has religion pagan

Will happen within 180 days of August 2, 1654
Checked again every 180 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1680)

Description

England had long had designs on Spain's American colonies and the Lord Protector wished to find profitable employment for the Army and Royal Navy after the conclusion of the 1st Anglo-Dutch War in 1654 lest they be tempted to overthrow his government. Furthermore such a scheme would advance the cause of Protestantism and add valuable lands to the realm. Cromwell selected Santo Domingo as the target for his expedition, but the Spanish discovered the whole scheme before they even set sail. Defeated at Santo Domingo the English commissioners sailed on to Jamaica to try their luck.

Actions

A. Outfit the expedition

  • -200 relations with Spain
  • Gain a temporary casus belli against Spain for 60 months
  • Gain 5 warships in a random province in Caribbean
  • Gain 3 transports in the same province
  • +10000 infantry in the same province
  • +10 artillery in the same province
  • -200 gold
  • Event 285248 - Spain Reacts to Cromwell's Western Design for Spain is triggered immediately

B. We have got our hands full

  • +25 relations with Spain
  • -5 victory points

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 60 days of January 2, 1657
Checked again every 60 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1681)

Description

Even before a peace treaty with Spain was signed, Cromwell had directed that settlers be found and sent to Jamaica. Local governments were quick to take the opportunity to send vagrants, convicts and other undesirables to fulfill Cromwell's command. The only exceptions were men from England's other Caribbean possessions who wished to take advantage of the cheap land in the newly-conquered island.

Actions

A. Settle the island

  • +2000 population in Jamaica
  • Jamaica converts to the state religion
  • Culture in Jamaica changes to english
  • -10 gold

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Oliver Cromwell is active

Will happen on April 14, 1657
unless prevented by
Action B of 164142 - The Protectorate for England

Description

In 1657, Cromwell was offered the crown by Parliament as part of a revised constitutional settlement, presenting him with a dilemma, since he had been instrumental in abolishing the Stuart monarchy. Cromwell agonised for six weeks over the offer. He was attracted by the prospect of stability it held out, but in a speech on 13 April 1657 he made clear that God's providence had spoken against the office of King: “I would not seek to set up that which Providence hath destroyed and laid in the dust, and I would not build Jericho again”. Instead, Cromwell was ceremonially re-installed as Lord Protector at Westminster Hall, sitting upon King Edward's Chair, which was specially moved from Westminster Abbey for the occasion. Notably, the office of Lord Protector was still not to become hereditary, though Cromwell was now able to nominate his own successor. Cromwell himself, however, was at pains to minimise his role, describing himself as a constable or watchman, not as a supreme head of state.

Actions

A. I will not build Jericho again

  • Centralization -1
  • Aristocracy -1
  • Monarch's diplomatic skill -3 for 36 months
  • Monarch's administrative skill -3 for 36 months
  • Stability -1
  • -10 victory points
  • Monarch Interregnum becomes active

B. By right of conquest, I claim the throne!

  • Monarch Oliver I ° becomes active
  • Monarch Richard IV ° becomes active
  • Monarch Interregnum * becomes active
  • Monarch Oliver Cromwell will never rule
  • Monarch Richard Cromwell will never rule
  • Monarch Charles II will never rule
  • Monarch James II will never rule
  • Monarch James III ° will never rule
  • Centralization +1
  • Aristocracy +2
  • Quality -1
  • -200 relations with Scotland
  • -200 relations with France
  • -200 relations with Netherlands
  • Stability -2
  • Event 3031 - The Glorious Revolution and the Bill of Rights for England will never fire
  • Event 164048 - The Glorious Revolution and the Bill of Rights for England will never fire

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Irondekoit
    • Own Susquehanna

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1660
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1682)

Description

After the discovery of the North-American territories, the first English colonies were not long in being set up. The religious intolerance which pushed persecuted people to exile - and the demographic pressure related to the enclosures movement attracted many colonists and allowed a fast development of the settlements.

Actions

A. Good!

  • Irondekoit will be considered a national province
  • Tuscarora will be considered a national province
  • Susquehanna will be considered a national province
  • Erie will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Winisk
    • Own Nueltin

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1660
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1687)

Description

Once maritime explorations was over, English tried to make profitable their knowledge of the northern Canada. Historically two French, Pierre Radisson and Médard des Groseillers, contributed to exploration and settlements around the Hudson Bay.

Actions

A. Firm ground

  • Winisk will be considered a national province
  • Eskimalt will be considered a national province
  • Nueltin will be considered a national province
  • Chimo will be considered a national province
  • Athabaska will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on April 24, 1660

Description

Cromwell died in 1658. When his son Richard resigned office after only a year, the door was open for political anarchy as the flag of Rebellion was raised for Charles II in exile. Parliament was summoned. The Army started to rumble. A new Lord Protector by the name of John Lambert was suggested, but his role would be more of a military dictator than a protector. The people of good standing were poised with either a plundering army or a coalition between the army and political and religious radicals. A return to Monarchy, even with Bishops and House of Lords, but with guarantees for law and order started to sound like a good alternative. Cromwell's trusted man General Monk walked to London with his Army and Charles II was elected as King in 1660 after giving guarantees for amnesty and army salaries and the role of Parliament.

Actions

A. King Charles II

  • Flag graphics extension set to "Union"
  • Grant independence to Scotland
  • Cede The Highlands to Scotland
  • Cede The Grampians to Scotland
  • Cede Lothian to Scotland
  • Cede Strathclyde to Scotland
  • The Highlands will no longer be considered a national province
  • The Grampians will no longer be considered a national province
  • Lothian will no longer be considered a national province
  • Strathclyde will no longer be considered a national province
  • +150 relations with France
  • Gain a royal marriage with Scotland
  • +200 relations with Scotland
  • Aristocracy +2
  • Innovativeness +1
  • Stability +3
  • Leader Prince Rupert becomes active

B. Lord Protector John Lambert

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 3600 days of November 29, 1660
Checked again every 3600 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1675)

Description

The scientific environment created by men such as Hooke, Halley, Flamsteed or Newton led to the creation of institutions devoted to the research and discussion of scientific problems. The origins of the Royal Society lie in a group of men who began meeting in the mid-1640s to discuss the new natural philosophy. Its official foundation date is 28 November 1660. The Society was to meet weekly to witness experiments and discuss what we would now call scientific topics. It was Moray who first told the King, Charles II, of this venture and secured his approval and encouragement. The Royal Greenwich Observatory was founded on 22 June 1675 by King Charles II, upon request by John Flamsteed and other astronomers, and was built specifically to do work which would help to solve the problem of finding longitude while at sea.

Actions

A. Let's encourage scientific research!

  • -75 gold
  • Infrastructure tech investment: +150
  • Naval tech investment: +100

B. It's not worth a royal funding

England — Not random

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1665
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 29, 1668)
unless prevented by
Action B of 170062 - Radisson and des Groseilliers for France

Description

Unhappy with their treatment by the officials of New France, Radisson and des Groseilliers arrived in New England and offered their services to the English colonel George Cartwright who took them to England and submitted them to the royal court. In June 1668, they finally left England, sailing into Hudson Bay from the north.

Actions

A. Welcome!

B. They can't be trusted!

  • Land tech investment: +100
  • +50 relations with France

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Own Anglia

Will happen within 90 days of February 2, 1665
Checked again every 90 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after April 30, 1665)

Description

The Great Plague (1665-1666) was a massive outbreak of disease in England that killed 75,000 to 100,000 people, up to a fifth of London's population. The disease is generally believed to have been bubonic plague, an infection by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, transmitted via a rat vector. Other symptom patterns of the bubonic plague, such as septicemic plague and pneumonic plague were also present. Thought to have arrived from the Netherlands on merchant vessels, records state that deaths in London crept up to 1000 persons per week, then 2000 persons per week and, by September 1665, to 7000 persons per week. By late autumn, the death toll began to slow until, in February 1666, it was considered safe enough for the King and his entourage to return to the city. By this time, however, trade with the European continent had spread this outbreak of plague to France, where it died out the following winter. Nonetheless, a fifth of the city had been killed, resulting in an unprecedented loss of infrastructure and capital.

Actions

A. Argh!

  • -8000 population in Anglia
  • Revolt risk value in Anglia +2
  • -2 base tax value in Anglia
  • Infrastructure tech investment: -250
  • Stability -1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Savannah
    • Own Carolina
    • Own Santee
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Susquehanna
    • Own Delaware
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Catskill
    • Own Adirondak
    • Own Sebago
    • Own Connecticut
    • Own Massachusetts
    • Own Penobscot

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1666
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1670)

Description

When the English colonists arrived in America they immediately met Native Americans. Slowly they pressed the Natives back and conquered more land to settle. But they did not manage to subjugate the Native American, whom moved deeper into their vast continent. More or less from the outset the colonists where plagued by Indian raids, pillaging and burning their farms and hamlets. The Anglo-French and Anglo-Spanish competition did not make the things easier for the colonists as the French and the Spaniards induced the Natives to raid and sometimes provided guns and leadership. In this situation His Majesty's Government in London had two possibilities. Either to invest in a perimeter defense of forts and garrisons or let the colonials form into militias and solve the defense on their own. The first solution was costly and London rarely viewed it a viable option. However the price London had to pay was a growing self-assurance among the colonists, a self-assurance that would become a serious problem in 1773.

Actions

A. Leave it to the Colonial Militia

  • Stability +1

B. Invest in expensive Perimeter Defense

  • Event 3347 - Native Raids for England will never fire
  • -800 gold
  • Fortress level in a random province in North America +1
  • Fortress level in a random province in North America +1
  • Fortress level in a random province in North America +1

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 35 days of April 2, 1666
Checked again every 35 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after August 2, 1666)

Description

The fire of 1666 was one of the biggest calamities in the history of London, and came at the end of the Great Plague of London — an outbreak of bubonic plague that killed perhaps hundreds of thousands —the Great Fire is thought to have brought a quicker end to the plague, by killing off any disease-carrying rats and their fleas. It destroyed 13,200 houses, 87 parish churches, 6 chapels, 44 Company Halls, the Royal Exchange, the Custom House, St Paul's Cathedral, the Guildhall, the Bridewell Palace and other City prisons, the Session House, four bridges across the rivers Thames and Fleet, and three city gates, and made homeless 100,000 people, one sixth of the city's inhabitants at that time. The death toll from the fire is traditionally thought to have been 16, but a recent book theorizes that thousands may have died in the flames or from smoke inhalation. Nevertheless, the entire city had to be rebuilt under the supervision of Sir Christopher Wren in the following years, thatched roofs were banned, and millions of pounds of infrastructure had been lost.

Actions

A. We must rebuild our great city...

  • -3000 population in Anglia
  • -2 base tax value in Anglia
  • Infrastructure tech investment: -750
  • Stability -1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Serfdom is at 4 or higher
  • Aristocracy is at 4 or higher
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Massachusetts
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Delaware
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Santee

Will happen within 500 days of January 2, 1670
Checked again every 500 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1680)

Description

Indentured Servants were immigrants that, in exchange for the cost of passage and maintenance, were required to spent a period of years in the service of other, generally wealthy, colonists, often working in agriculture. These indentured servants were a major source of immigration into British North America, and the practice continued well into the 1700s.

Actions

A. Indentured Servants Cross the Atlantic to a New Life

  • +500 population in Massachusetts
  • +250 population in Connecticut
  • +500 population in Manhattan
  • +500 population in Delaware
  • +750 population in Chesapeake
  • +500 population in Roanoke
  • +250 population in Santee
  • -1000 population in Anglia
  • -500 population in Yorkshire

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Carolina
    • Own Santee

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1670
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1690)

Description

After the discovery of the North-American territories, the first English colonies were not long in being set up. The religious intolerance which pushed persecuted people to exile - and the demographic pressure related to the enclosures movement attracted many colonists and allowed a fast development of the settlements. Historically, Carolina was a land coveted by Spaniards, French and English. Despite several attempts in XVIth century, English had to wait until the end of the XVIIth century to see a colony being firmly established.

Actions

A. Good!

  • Alleghany will be considered a national province
  • Carolina will be considered a national province
  • Santee will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Scotland is a vassal of England
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Own Lothian
      • Own Strathclyde
      • The following must not occur:
        • Scotland exists
  • Monarch Richard IV ° is active

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1670
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 1, 1710)
unless prevented by
Action A of 276000 - The Union Act for Scotland

Description

Despite being one of the longest reigns in the history of the British Isles, Richard Cromwell's tenure as King wasn't a particuarly eventful one. From the death of his father, Oliver I, in 1658, Richard's life had been one of constant quarrel with, and estrangement from, the various parliaments which had ruled the nations over which he nominally presided. Like his father - a man whose ghost the indifferent King never could quite lay to rest - Richard had always been a republican at heart, so quite how he managed to rule over his ever-expanding territories as an annointed King for over fifty years was the source of much bafflement to everyone. After several largely insignificant and wholly unsuccessful landings by Charles Stuart and his ever-optimistic Scots entourage, Richard finally gave in to Parliament (a seemingly recurring theme) and signed Lambert's Act of Union, a series of documents and hearings legally and definitively uniting Richard's territories into a single Kingdom of Great Britain. The House of Commons in Westminster exercised supreme judicial and military power over every inch of the new Kingdom. With no elected assembley north of the border and no sizable military garrison to try and lure to their cause, the Stuart Pretender and his friends would have to try a little harder next time...

Actions

A. We are Great Britain

  • Flag graphics extension set to "Lambert"
  • Centralization +1
  • Stability +1
  • Inherit the realms of Scotland

England — Not random

Will happen within 30 days of January 3, 1670
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1699)
unless prevented by
Action B of 3344 - Colonial Defense for England

Description

The settlement of a growing number of white people in the colonies brought discontent and hatred both among the natives and the settlers. The English colonists would ignore the natives as long as they could grab their land and would suppress, on false pretexts, all attempts at reaction and redress of wrongs. The French were more conciliatory towards natives, trying to convert and assimilate them into their religion, realm and culture. However, they also sometimes gained the enmity of powerful tribes (such as the Mohawks) by their interference in Indian tribal conflicts and fur trade control. Once in a while, hard-pressed tribe would go on rampage and raid nearby settlements with total savagery, matched equally by the white reprisals.

Actions

A. Oh no!

  • Create a colonial revolt in a random province
  • Create a colonial revolt in a random province
  • Create a colonial revolt in a random province

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 120 days of April 2, 1670
Checked again every 120 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after August 2, 1690)

Description

After what is commonly thought of as the single most disasterous period in the city's history, London had to be rebuilt almost from scratch after the Great Fire and Plague. During the 1670s, 80s and 90s, Sir Christopher Wren oversaw the reconstruction of England's devestated capital. 51 churches - including St Bride's, St Mary le Bow, St Clement Danes, St Benet Paul's Wharf, and St Stephen Walbrook were built to replace the 87 which had been annihilated by the fire. In addition, he was involved in the design of the Monument to the Great Fire of London, Royal Greenwich Observatory, Chelsea Hospital, Greenwich Hospital, Marlborough House, the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, the Wren Library of Trinity College, Cambridge, and many other distinguished buildings. Wren died in 1723 and was buried at St Paul's. An inscription inside his famous cathedral, dedicated to the architect, reads, ''Lector, si monumentum requiris, circumspice'' (''Reader, if you seek a memorial, look around you'').

Actions

A. Excellent!

  • +5000 population in Anglia
  • Revolt risk value in Anglia -2
  • +6 base tax value in Anglia
  • Infrastructure tech investment: +3000
  • -500 gold
  • Stability +3

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Nueltin
    • Own Eskimalt
    • Own Winisk
    • Own Attawapiskat
    • Own Chisasibi
    • Own Minto
    • Own Ungava
    • Own Torngat
    • Own Nain
    • Own Caniapiscau
  • The following must not occur:
    • Land is at 6 or higher

Will happen on May 3, 1670

Description

The Hudson's Bay Company was established in 1670 under the patronage of Prince Rupert, who lent his name to the vast Canadian hinterlands that soon came under Company control. It exploited the large and very profitable fur trade, and as such was in direct competition with the French until 1713. The Company has continued to exist to this day, making it the oldest corporation still in operation.

Actions

A. Let Us Exploit the North

  • +3 colonists
  • +4 merchants
  • Trade tech investment: +250
  • -25 relations with France

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1672
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1672)
unless prevented by
Action B of 3028 - The Restoration of the Stuarts for England

Description

Charles II was secretly catholic and his brother James II openly. The Decree of Indulgence issued in 1672 was aimed at relieving the situation for dissenters and Catholics. In addition to personal reasons, any King who supported Catholicism could count on the support from France. In fact, Charles II got his reward in form of a large sum of money in a Treaty closed behind the back of the Parliament. Around the same time Parliament issued the Bill of Test which again excluded dissenting religious groups (including Catholics) from public offices and allowed persecution. The Parliament subsequently raised the issue of excluding the openly catholic James II from succession rights.

Actions

A. Religious Freedom for All

  • Centralization +3
  • Aristocracy +1
  • Innovativeness -1
  • Change religion to protestant

B. Protestant Supremacy

  • Centralization +3
  • Aristocracy +1
  • Innovativeness -1
  • Change religion to reformed
  • Stability -1

C. Catholic Supremacy

  • Centralization +3
  • Aristocracy +1
  • Innovativeness -1
  • Change religion to catholic
  • Stability -2

England — Not random

Will happen within 200 days of January 2, 1673
Checked again every 200 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1673)

Description

Pepys, famous for his diary, became Secretary to the Admiralty in 1673, helping the Navy to reform itself after the failures of the Dutch Wars.

Actions

A. Employ Him

  • Naval tech investment: +250
  • Land -1

B. Don't Employ Him

  • Land +1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • State religion is protestant
    • State religion is reformed
  • Monarch Charles II is active

Will happen on September 30, 1673

Description

Heir presumptive to his brother Charles II's throne, James (II) Stuart had converted to Catholicism. After the death of his 1st wife, James married Mary of Modena - the Catholic daughter of Alfonso IV d'Este. Considered a Papal agent she was also an advocate of absolutism along the French model. When Charles died without legitimate issue, his brother became King, raising concerns as any heirs of James II and Mary would be raised Catholics. Added to this were James's despotic tendencies and a formula for trouble was brewed. The birth of a son (the Old Pretender) alarmed the people even more and the Whig faction staged the 'Glorious Revolution' - deposing James II and Mary for James's Protestant daughter Mary and her husband William of Orange. It also began the Jacobite movement.

Actions

A. Permit James and Mary to wed

B. Find James a Protestant bride

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Own Anglia
  • Control Anglia

Will happen within 180 days of January 2, 1675
Checked again every 180 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1700)

Description

Norfolk system can track its roots to the late Middle Ages when small farmers in Northern Anglia started to improve their agricultural methods using clover and turnip instead of traditional fallow-land. This method proved to be very successful as greatly fertilized soil with nitrogen and other nutrients. The system became very popular in the late 17th century when many landlords became interested in rational use of land and in the early 19th century most of England's land, now engrossed and enclosed by very few owners, used as the basis of their production.

Though, a peasant method in it's origin, Norfolk contributed to the increase of agrarian capitalism, destroying this way many communities and creating cheap labour for early industrialized cities.

Actions

A. Let's introduce this great system!

  • Infrastructure tech investment: +2500
  • Global revolt risk +1 for 48 months
  • +2 base tax value in Anglia
  • +1 base tax value in a random province in England
  • +1 base tax value in a random province in England
  • +1 base tax value in a random province in England

B. Let's keep using three-course instead

  • Global revolt risk -2 for 36 months
  • Stability +1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Serfdom is at 3 or higher

Will happen within 100 days of January 2, 1675
Checked again every 100 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1700)

Description

Transportation as a punishment for an offence first began during the late 1600s. The rudimentary English prison system was woefully inadequate for the numbers convicted of offences, and hence the relocation of convicts to the colonies acted both as a safety value on domestic dissent and unrest, while providing a labour force for the new colonies. Transported convicts were first sent to British North America, but were diverted to Australia after the American Revolution.

Actions

A. Allow the Transportation of Convicts

B. Keep the Malcontents in England

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Serfdom is at 3 or higher
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Massachusetts
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Delaware
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Santee

Will happen within 500 days of January 2, 1680
Checked again every 500 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1690)
unless prevented by
Action B of 21068 - The Transportation of Convicts for England

Description

Convicts from the British Isles formed a significant component of pre-Revolution British North America, especially as their situation made them a labour force ideal for the sorts of outdoor tasks that the more established colonists considered beneath them.

Actions

A. Convicts Begin a New Life in the Colonies

  • +500 population in Massachusetts
  • +250 population in Connecticut
  • +500 population in Manhattan
  • +500 population in Delaware
  • +500 population in Chesapeake
  • +500 population in Roanoke
  • +250 population in Santee
  • -500 population in Northumberland
  • -500 population in Lancashire
  • -500 population in Lincoln

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 300 days of January 2, 1684
Checked again every 300 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1684)

Description

By the early 1680s, garrisoning Tangiers was becoming increasingly difficult and costly against a determined Moroccan effort to recover the city. In 1684, the decision was taken to abandon the enclave.

Actions

A. Cede Tangiers to Morocco

  • Cede Tangiers to Morocco

B. Continue to Hold the African Outpost

  • -150 gold
  • Stability -1
  • -200 relations with Morocco

England — Not random

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1684
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 29, 1686)
unless prevented by
Action A of 164032 - Radisson and des Groseilliers Offer their Services to England for England
Action B of 170062 - Radisson and des Groseilliers for France
Action A, B of 170063 - The Return of Radisson and des Groseilliers for France

Description

Turned away by the French authorities Radisson and des Groseilliers returned to the Hudson Bay Company.

Actions

A. Welcome!

  • -100 gold
  • Leader des Groseilliers becomes active
  • Leader Radisson becomes active
  • -50 relations with France

B. We have the money only for one

  • -50 gold
  • Land tech investment: +50
  • Leader Radisson becomes active
  • -25 relations with France

C. They can't be trusted!

  • Land tech investment: +100
  • +50 relations with France

England — Not random

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1684
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 29, 1686)
unless prevented by
Action A of 164032 - Radisson and des Groseilliers Offer their Services to England for England
Action B of 170062 - Radisson and des Groseilliers for France
Action A, C of 170063 - The Return of Radisson and des Groseilliers for France

Description

Always frustrated by the French, Radisson returned to the service of the Hudson Bay Company.

Actions

A. Welcome!

  • -50 gold
  • Leader Radisson becomes active
  • -25 relations with France

B. He can't be trusted!

  • Land tech investment: +50
  • +25 relations with France

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on July 7, 1685
unless prevented by
Action B of 164020 - The Duke of York and the Catholic Wedding for England

Description

When the Catholic James II succeeded to the throne in February 1685, his Protestant nephew the Duke of Monmouth was pressed to lead a rising which would be synchronized with a rebellion by the Earl of Argyll in Scotland. Monmouth landed at Lyme Regis on 11 June and was proclaimed king in Taunton. Local men -but few notables -flocked to join him, and he had the best of a clash with the Earl of Feversham's royal army on the 27th. He then heard that Argyll had been executed, and fell back to Bridgwater. Feversham followed, establishing himself at Westonzoyland. He had about 2, 700 regulars (including Marlborough) to Monmouth's 3, 500 largely untrained men. Monmouth decided on a night attack, but his men were detected by a cavalry vedette and discovered that a wide drainage ditch, the Bussex Rhine, lay between them and Feversham. Although they fought with courage they were no match for the firepower of the royal infantry, and as they broke Feversham's horse cut many of them down. The rebellion was suppressed with a savagery still remembered in the West Country. Monmouth himself was captured, and executed by a headsman who botched the job entirely.

Actions

A. Kill the bastard!

  • Centralization +1
  • Innovativeness -1
  • Cornwall revolts
  • Cornwall revolts
  • +50 gold
  • Global revolt risk +6 for 36 months
  • Stability +1

B. We need a Protestant King of England

  • Monarch James III ° becomes active
  • Monarch Anne becomes active
  • Leader James III becomes active
  • Monarch James II will never rule
  • Monarch James III ° will never rule
  • Centralization -2
  • Aristocracy +1
  • Innovativeness +1
  • Global revolt risk +4 for 12 months
  • Stability -1
  • Event 164255 - Bloody Assizes for England will never fire

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 5 days of August 2, 1685
Checked again every 5 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after October 2, 1685)
unless prevented by
Action B of 164254 - Battle of Sedgemoor for England

Description

The Bloody Assizes were a series of trials carried out in the aftermath of the Battle of Sedgemoor, which ended the Monmouth Rebellion in England. There were five judges: Sir William Montague, Sir Robert Wright, Sir Francis Wythens, Sir Creswell Levinz and Sir Henry Polexfen, led by Lord Chief Justice George ''The Hanging Judge'' Jeffreys. Over a thousand rebels were in prison awaiting the trials, which started in Winchester on 26th August. The first notable trial was that of an elderly gentlewoman called Dame Alice Lyle. The jury reluctantly found her guilty, and, the law recognizing no distinction between principals and accessories in treason, she was sentenced to be burned. This was commuted to beheading, with the sentence being carried out in Winchester market-place on 2 September 1685. From Winchester the court proceeded to Salisbury, Dorchester and on to Taunton, before finishing up at Wells on 23 September. More than 1,400 prisoners were dealt with and although most were sentenced to death, only around were hanged or hanged, drawn and quartered. The Taunton Assize took place in the Great Hall of Taunton Castle - of the 500 prisoners brought before the court on the 18th/19th September, 144 were hanged and their remains displayed around the county for all to see and know what happened to those who rebelled against King James.

Actions

A. Hang 'em all!

  • Innovativeness -2
  • A random province in England revolts
  • A random province in England revolts
  • Global revolt risk +4 for 6 months
  • Stability -2

England — Not random

Will happen within 360 days of January 1, 1687
Checked again every 360 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 1, 1688)

Description

From 1684 to 1687 Isaac Newton worked continuously on a grand synthesis of the whole of mechanics, the Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, in which he developed his three laws of motion and showed in detail that the universal force of gravitation could explain the fall of an apple as well as the precise motions of planets and comets.

Actions

A. OK

  • Infrastructure tech investment: +200
  • Land tech investment: +200
  • Naval tech investment: +200
  • Trade tech investment: +200

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Innovativeness is at 2 or higher

Will happen within 120 days of March 2, 1687
Checked again every 120 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1695)

Description

English physicist and mathematician Isaac Newton was the culminating figure of the scientific revolution of the 17th century. In optics his discovery of the composition of white light integrated the phenomena of colors into the science of light and laid the foundation for modern physical optics. In mechanics his three laws of motion the basic principles of modern physics resulted in the formulation of the law of universal gravitation. In mathematics he was the original discoverer of the infinitesimal calculus. Newton's 'Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy' 1687 was one of the most important single works in the history of modern science.

Actions

A. OK

  • Infrastructure tech investment: +50

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 10 days of February 17, 1688
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after March 19, 1702)
unless prevented by
Action B of 276012 - The Glorious Revolution and the Claim of Rights for Scotland
Action B of 3082 - The Glorious Revolution and the Claim of Rights for Scotland

Description

Many Scots exiles who had fled the Stuart regime returned home with William from Holland, and a Scottish convention drafted the Claim of Right, which demanded a free Parliament and a Presbyterian Church. The exiled James VII ordered the convention to obey their rightful King, whilst the Scottish Parliament proclaimed William King of Scots and reclaimed their political power. Not all Scots accepted the new situation, there were supporters of the exiled Stuart dynasty, the 'Jacobites', which were assemblying forces in areas beyond government's control for the purpose of a counter-revolution. They believed that the natural order of Scottish society, with the rightful Stuart King at the top, was being destroyed by the Presbyterians. William of Orange wasn't particularly interested in Scotland as his life-long struggle was with Louis XIV of France and he relied on the money markets of London and Amsterdam to fund his war with the French. His invasion of England in 1688 was in many ways an indirect war effort against the French King. Scotland was either an irritation or a source of much needed troops to William.

Actions

A. Let's eradicate the pro-Stuart party there

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on December 11, 1688

Description

After Charles I had won the English Civil War he set out persecuting the Puritans, many of whom moved to the American colonies. He also closed Parliament and ruled by decree which created dissent among most groups in the English society. His son Charles II, however, fully understood that the moderate Protestants were the key group and he needed them badly. By introducing religious freedom, disqualifying religion as an issue when attaining a governmental post, and creating an ideology of the Monarch as standing above all religious issues, he managed to create a feeble truce among Englishmen. As a consequence Charles revived Parliament, but greatly diminished its powers. Furthermore, Charles set high standards ensuring fair and regular elections and that every one was equal under law. His brother James was a staunch Catholic and not particularly fond of the opposition that had deified a lot of his ambitions. James, influenced by the Duke of Tyrconnell and the Earl of Sunderland, had the Tory leader, Earl Danby propose in Parliament that the royal suspension power was to be abolished if Parliament passed a Declaration of Rights. In a masterly executed scheme the Whig leader, Earl Shaftsbury, made the proposal fall. King James was outraged and held a speech in Parliament informing the Commons that either he would govern as the appointee of God or they pass a redrafted Declaration of Rights. The choice was theirs and theirs alone. Finally after days of negotiation Parliament accepted what would be called the Bill of Rights, creating a division of powers between Parliament, an independent Star Chamber and the King. Parliament would create and pass laws, and control certain taxes as tax of income and wealth, while the King would approve laws and direct the foreign policy, execute wars and control the majority of taxation. Thus the venerable series of events known unto history as 'The Absolution' came to be. By the early 1690s, James II enjoyed the same level of power and influence as his cousin, Louis XIV of France, and never again would Parliament be in a position to flex its muscles at the House of Stuart...

Actions

A. Absolute Monarchy

  • Inherit the realms of Puritans
  • Centralization +5
  • Aristocracy +5
  • Innovativeness -2
  • Serfdom +3
  • Stability +3
  • Monarch Charles III ° becomes active
  • Monarch Henry IX ° becomes active
  • Monarch Mary III * becomes active
  • Monarch George I will never rule
  • Monarch George II will never rule
  • Monarch George III will never rule

B. Constitutional Monarchy

  • Inherit the realms of Puritans
  • Centralization -3
  • Aristocracy -4
  • Innovativeness +3
  • Serfdom -2
  • Stability +1
  • Monarch Charles III ° becomes active
  • Monarch Henry IX ° becomes active
  • Monarch Mary III * becomes active
  • Monarch George I will never rule
  • Monarch George II will never rule
  • Monarch George III will never rule

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on December 11, 1688
unless prevented by
Action B of 3028 - The Restoration of the Stuarts for England
Action B of 164020 - The Duke of York and the Catholic Wedding for England
Action B of 164143 - The Coronation for England

Description

James II came to power in 1685 and needed only three years to spend all of his credibility within Parliament. He openly worked for Catholicism and his own well being and with methods unacceptable to both Tories and Whigs alike. In 1688 Parliament called for Mary Stuart, James' staunchly Protestant daughter to usurp her father and found a newer, more constitutional form of monarchy. The so-called 'Glorious Revolution' was a bloodless coup hastened by the approval of the Bill of Rights, which stated important limitations to the royal authority: the Queen couldn't levy taxes, own personal armies, change state religion, pass laws without Parliament's consent and grant free elections for the renewal of the representatives in the Parliament. The Constitutional Monarchy was eventually born.

Actions

A. William of Orange

  • Flag graphics extension set to "Union"
  • Event 3082 - The Glorious Revolution and the Claim of Rights for Scotland is triggered immediately
  • Event 276012 - The Glorious Revolution and the Claim of Rights for Scotland is triggered immediately
  • Monarch Interregnum becomes active
  • Monarch William & Mary becomes active
  • Monarch William III becomes active
  • Monarch Anne becomes active
  • Monarch James II will never rule
  • Monarch James III ° will never rule
  • Centralization -2
  • Aristocracy -4
  • Serfdom -2
  • Innovativeness +3
  • Quality -1
  • Stability +2
  • -50 relations with France

B. Mary is our Queen, send the Dutchman home!

  • Flag graphics extension set to "Union"
  • Inherit the realms of Puritans
  • Monarch Mary II becomes active
  • Monarch Anne becomes active
  • Monarch James II will never rule
  • Monarch James III ° will never rule
  • Centralization +5
  • Aristocracy +5
  • Serfdom +1
  • Stability +1
  • -50 relations with Netherlands

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on December 11, 1688
unless prevented by
Action B of 3028 - The Restoration of the Stuarts for England
Action B of 164143 - The Coronation for England

Description

James II came to power in 1685 and needed only three years to spend all of his credibility within Parliament. He openly worked for Catholicism and his own well being and with methods unacceptable to both Tories and Whigs alike. In 1688 Parliament called for Mary Stuart, James' staunchly Protestant daughter to usurp her father and found a newer, more constitutional form of monarchy. The so-called 'Glorious Revolution' was a bloodless coup hastened by the approval of the Bill of Rights, which stated important limitations to the royal authority: the Queen couldn't levy taxes, own personal armies, change state religion, pass laws without Parliament's consent and grant free elections for the renewal of the representatives in the Parliament. The Constitutional Monarchy was eventually born.

Actions

A. Mary Stuart, our Protestant Queen

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on December 11, 1688

Description

By 1688 Lambert was long dead and the last signs of the young republic's qualified leadership seemingly along with him. With the government all but crippled by debt and disorder, Parliament called for Charles Stuart's staunchly Protestant granddaughter Mary to take the throne. Her family's restoration was strictly conditional, however, and the largely republican Parliament made every effort to enforce important limitations to the royal authority: the Queen couldn't levy taxes, own personal armies, change state religion, pass laws without Parliament's consent and grant free elections for the renewal of the representatives in the Parliament. The Constitutional Monarchy was eventually born.

Actions

A. The House of Stuart

  • Flag graphics extension set to "Union"
  • Monarch Mary II becomes active
  • Monarch Anne becomes active
  • Centralization -2
  • Serfdom -2
  • Innovativeness +2
  • Quality -1
  • Stability +2
  • +150 relations with France
  • +150 relations with Scotland
  • Event 3033 - Personal union with Holland for England will never fire
  • Event 164028 - Hanover and the British throne for England will never fire

England — Not random

Will happen within 300 days of January 2, 1689
Checked again every 300 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1689)

Description

John Locke was an initiator of the Enlightenment in England and France an inspirer of the U.S. Constitution and the author of among other works 'An Essay Concerning Human Understanding'. Locke held that knowledge of the world could only be gained by experience and reflection on experience and this knowledge was being gained by Boyle Sydenham Christiaan Huygens and Newton. They were the true philosophers who were advancing knowledge.

Actions

A. OK

  • Innovativeness +1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch William & Mary is active
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • England owns Connecticut
    • England owns Massachusetts

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1689
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1690)

Description

In 1686, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts were merged together by James II into a single Dominion under a royal governor. In 1689, upset with the arrangement, they desposed the royal governor upon the abdication of James II.

Actions

A. There is Unrest in the New England Colonies

  • Revolt risk value in Connecticut +2
  • Revolt risk value in Massachusetts +2

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 10 days of February 14, 1689
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after March 20, 1702)
unless prevented by
Action A of 164117 - The Restoration of the Monarchy for England

Description

After the Glorious Revolution in 1688 William of Orange-Nassau, stadholder of the Netherlands, and his wife, Mary II, arrived in England from Holland and were appointed joint sovereigns in 1689 of England by the Parliament. This effectively put William, one of the foremost Protestants of his time, in charge of both England and Holland under a personal union.

Actions

A. That was expected

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Monarch William & Mary is active
    • Monarch Mary II is active

Will happen within 90 days of January 2, 1690
Checked again every 90 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after November 22, 1695)

Description

Henry Purcell was an English Baroque composer. He has often been called England's first native composer, as though Purcell incorporated Italian and French stylistic elements into his music, he crafted a peculiarly English style. Purcell's earliest works include an ode to the birthday of King Charles II in 1670, various compositions during his appointment as organist at Westminster Abbey in 1680, at the age of just twenty two - throughout this period he composed music for literary contemporaries including John Dryden, Thomas Shadwell, Aphra Behn, John Playford, and even wrote overtures for Shakespeare. In 1685, Purcell penned two of his greatest pieces, 'I was glad' and 'My heart is inditing', for the coronation of King James II. Perhaps Purcell's greatest legacy, however, was his 'Music for the Funeral of Queen Mary' on the latter's death in December 1694. Only a year later Purcell himself died - he was only in his mid thirties and at the height of his influence. Henry Purcell is buried opposite the organ at Westminster Abbey, his epitaph reads: ''Here lyes Henry Purcell Esq., who left this life and is gone to that blessed place where only his harmony can be exceeded.''

Actions

A. We have composers too!

  • +5 victory points
  • Infrastructure tech investment: +20

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1691
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1692)

Description

With the Dominion of New England having collapsed, the individual colonies have regained their semi-autonomy, and peace has been restored to the region.

Actions

A. Normalcy Returns to the New England Colonies

  • Revolt risk value in Connecticut -2
  • Revolt risk value in Massachusetts -2

England — Not random

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1692
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1697)

Description

The Bank of England was founded in 1694. It soon enjoyed a reputation of seriousness and reliability, in particular regarding the credibility of the English Pound Sterling, in a time where most other currencies were at the mercy of state bankruptcies and coinage debasement. This stability was preponderant in the slowly but constantly increasing domination of the world economy by Great Britain in the 18th and 19th centuries. It also allowed a greater flexibility to the British government in raising funds for warfare.

Actions

A. National Loans at 500 ducats

  • Gain Fine Arts Academy in the capital province
  • Size of loans changed to 500 ducats
  • -5% inflation
  • Stability +2

B. National Loans at 200 ducats

  • Gain Fine Arts Academy in the capital province
  • Size of loans changed to 200 ducats
  • -10% inflation
  • Stability +2

C. National Loans at 800 ducats

  • Gain Fine Arts Academy in the capital province
  • Size of loans changed to 800 ducats
  • +5% inflation
  • Stability -1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Savannah
    • Own Carolina
    • Own Santee
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Susquehanna
    • Own Delaware
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Catskill
    • Own Adirondak
    • Own Sebago
    • Own Connecticut
    • Own Massachusetts
    • Own Penobscot

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1700
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1705)

Description

When the English colonists arrived in America they immediately met Native Americans. Slowly they pressed the Natives back and conquered more land to settle. But they did not manage to subjugate the Native American, whom moved deeper into their vast continent. More or less from the outset the colonists where plagued by Indian raids, pillaging and burning their farms and hamlets. The Anglo-French and Anglo-Spanish competition did not make the things easier for the colonists as the French and the Spaniards induced the Natives to raid and sometimes provided guns and leadership. In this situation His Majesty's Government in London had two possibilities. Either to invest in a perimeter defense of forts and garrisons or let the colonials form into militias and solve the defense on their own. The first solution was costly and London rarely viewed it a viable option. However the price London had to pay was a growing self-assurance among the colonists, a self-assurance that would become a serious problem in 1773.

Actions

A. Invest in expensive Perimeter Defense

  • Event 3348 - Native Raids for England will never fire
  • -1000 gold
  • Fortress level in a random province in North America +1
  • Fortress level in a random province in North America +1
  • Fortress level in a random province in North America +1
  • Fortress level in a random province in North America +1
  • Fortress level in a random province in North America +1

B. Leave it to the Colonial Militia

  • Stability +1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Serfdom is at 4 or higher
  • Aristocracy is at 4 or higher
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Massachusetts
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Delaware
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Santee

Will happen within 500 days of January 2, 1700
Checked again every 500 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1710)

Description

Indentured Servants were immigrants that, in exchange for the cost of passage and maintenance, were required to spent a period of years in the service of other, generally wealthy, colonists, often working in agriculture. These indentured servants were a major source of immigration into British North America, and the practice continued well into the 1700s.

Actions

A. Indentured Servants Cross the Atlantic to a New Life

  • +500 population in Massachusetts
  • +250 population in Connecticut
  • +750 population in Manhattan
  • +750 population in Delaware
  • +750 population in Chesapeake
  • +500 population in Roanoke
  • +250 population in Santee
  • +250 population in Carolina
  • -1000 population in Anglia
  • -500 population in Bristol

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Savannah
    • Own Alabama

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1700
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1730)

Description

After the discovery of the North-American territories, the first English colonies were not long in being set up. The religious intolerance which pushed persecuted people to exile - and the demographic pressure related to the enclosures movement attracted many colonists and allowed a fast development of the settlements. Historically, Georgia took an important role as a border of the Spanish settlements of Florida which it contributed to contain out of the English colonies.

Actions

A. Good!

  • Savannah will be considered a national province
  • Alabama will be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Scotland is a vassal of England
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Own Lothian
      • Own Strathclyde
      • The following must not occur:
        • Scotland exists
  • None of the following must occur:

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1700
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 31, 1819)
unless prevented by
Action A of 276000 - The Union Act for Scotland

Description

In the midst of the Spanish Succession War (1700-1713), the Parliament voted the Act of Union in 1707. When confirmed by the Scottish vote, it established the Union of Scotland and England (and its Irish possessions) under the same monarch into one realm under the title of Great Britain. A new flag, the Union Flag was adopted as a symbol of the Union.

Actions

A. We are Great Britain

  • Flag graphics extension set to "UK"
  • Culture in Lothian changes to english
  • Culture in Strathclyde changes to english
  • Culture in The Grampians changes to english
  • Centralization +1
  • Stability +1
  • The Highlands will be considered a national province
  • The Grampians will be considered a national province
  • Lothian will be considered a national province
  • Strathclyde will be considered a national province
  • Inherit the realms of Scotland

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch William III is active
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • State religion is protestant
    • State religion is reformed

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1701
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1701)

Description

In 1701 Queen Anne's son died, leaving the succession in doubt. Therefore, the Catholic Stuarts could eventually reclaim the English Throne after her death. To prevent continued religious struggle, the Act of Settlement was signed, determining that every English King had to be a member of the Anglican Church, i.e. a Protestant. The Protestant with the closest ties to the Stuart Dynasty at that time was Sophie, the Mother of Elector George Ludwig of Hanover and granddaughter of King James I.

Actions

A. Sign it

  • Stability +1
  • -50 relations with Papal States
  • -50 relations with France
  • +100 relations with Hanover

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch Richard IV ° is active
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • State religion is protestant
    • State religion is reformed

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1701
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1701)

Description

Despite siring several notable bastards, the death of the childless Queen Dorothy in 1676 coupled with Parliament's refusal to let Richard marry his mistress (on the grounds that she had previously been married to a Roman Catholic) meant that, effectively, the House of Cromwell would come to an end with the King's demise. Richard was outraged, condemning both the Commons and his role as a constitutional monarch. For years, the King had maintained that the only reason Parliament possessed the power it did was because of his father - and for years, his cries fell on deaf ears. Finally, in 1701, the ailing King made a stand, declaring the Act of Settlement, a piece of royal legislation handing the crown to the eldest surviving heir of Sophia, Electress of Hanover. In the beginning, Parliament was outraged, and issued a writ against the legislation, claiming it was illegal as it had not been through the Commons. A few months later, however, the King's beloved mistress caught Scarlet fever, dying almost immediately. Richard was thrown into prolonged bouts of melancholy, and in a rare of act of sympathy, Parliament finally accepted the Act of Settlement, knowing that realistically, the old and distraught King could never produce an heir.

Actions

A. Sign it

  • Stability +1
  • -50 relations with Papal States
  • -50 relations with France
  • +100 relations with Hanover

England — Not random

Will happen within 360 days of January 1, 1704
Checked again every 360 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 1, 1705)

Description

Newton's discoveries in optics were presented in his Optica (published in 1704) in which he elaborated his theory that light is composed of corpuscles or particles. His corpuscular theory dominated optics until the early 19th century when it was replaced by the wave theory of light.

Actions

A. OK

  • Land tech investment: +250
  • Naval tech investment: +250

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Savannah
    • Own Carolina
    • Own Santee
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Susquehanna
    • Own Delaware
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Catskill
    • Own Adirondak
    • Own Sebago
    • Own Connecticut
    • Own Massachusetts
    • Own Penobscot

Will happen within 30 days of January 3, 1705
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1759)
unless prevented by
Action A of 3345 - Colonial Defense for England

Description

The settlement of white people in North and South American had reached considerable proportions in the 18th century (they were nearly 2.5 million whites in North America at the time). Seeing their hunting and farming grounds taken over by settlers, the few remaining hard-pressed tribes would go on rampage and raid nearby settlements with total savagery, matched equally by the white reprisals.

Actions

A. Oh no!

  • Create a colonial revolt in a random province in North America
  • Create a colonial revolt in a random province in North America
  • Create a colonial revolt in a random province in North America

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Country has at least 8 non-colonial provinces

Will happen within 360 days of March 2, 1709
Checked again every 360 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1710)

Description

In the 17th century the growing demand for iron was frustrated because the timber for making charcoal (the fuel used for blast-furnaces) was scarce and expensive, and large furnaces were not feasible because charcoal was too soft to support a heavy charge of ore. Raw coal was an obvious alternative, but the presence of sulphur in it spoilt the quality of the iron. At his Coalbrookdale works in 1709 Darby solved this problem by using coke, which burnt cleanly. Smelting iron with coke was a key process in the development of the Industrial Revolution.

Actions

A. A great achievement!

  • +1 base tax value in Midlands
  • +1 base tax value in Lancashire
  • +1 base tax value in a random province
  • Infrastructure tech investment: +200
  • Trade tech investment: +200
  • Naval tech investment: +200
  • Land tech investment: +200

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Country has at least 8 non-colonial provinces

Will happen within 120 days of March 2, 1712
Checked again every 120 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 2, 1769)

Description

In 1712 Thomas Newcomen, appointed to the maintenance of a primitive steam engine in the Cornwall mines, introduced some radical improvements in the engine's efficiency, already attempted and to some extent successfully achieved by Thomas Savery in 1698. This improved engine was used to pump water from the coal mines, an important problem faced by every mine. The engine of Newcomen was a big and expensive one, but it could pump 45 litres of water in each pumping cycle, thus being more efficient than Savery's original project, the socalled Miners' Friend.

Actions

A. A great advancement!

  • +1 base tax value in Cornwall
  • +1 base tax value in a random province
  • Infrastructure tech investment: +200
  • Trade tech investment: +200
  • Naval tech investment: +200
  • Land tech investment: +200

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on April 12, 1713
unless prevented by
Action A of 285213 - Bourbonist defeat in war of Spanish succession for Spain
Action A of 187005 - Austrian rulers in Spain for Habsburg Spain

Description

The Spanish war of succession was also slow to end. Since Spain and Austria had not settled the issue and it was impossible to reach an agreement between all participants, it was decided that separate peace treaties between the parties would end the war. This decision, arranged between France and England, was favourable to England, who ignored the wishes of other members of the alliance, forcing them to follow suit. By the treaty with France on April 11, 1713, Louis XIV recognized the new King of England and confirmed the renunciation of Felipe's claims to the French throne. Hudson Bay territory, Acadia, St. Kitts and Newfoundland were ceded, and the demolition of the fortress of Dunkirk agreed. By the treaty with Spain on July 13, England obtained Gibraltar and Minorca, and a monopoly on slave trade with the Spanish colonies for the next 30 years. England international standing was increased by the peace of Utrecht, and her commercial empire took a big leap, displacing that of the Netherlands, that entered a decline.

Actions

A. The equilibrium has been preserved

  • Stability +1
  • +25 relations with France
  • +25 relations with Spain
  • +25 relations with Bavaria
  • Monarch's diplomatic skill +2 for 24 months
  • Monarch's military skill +2 for 24 months
  • Trade tech investment: +500
  • +100 gold

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 15 days of January 1, 1714
Checked again every 15 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after August 1, 1714)
unless prevented by
Action A of 164117 - The Restoration of the Monarchy for England

Description

In 1701 Queen Anne's son died, leaving the succession in doubt. The Parliament, which grew more and more powerful over the years as result of a stagnating monarchy which was completely disinterested in internal contrasts between Protestants and Catholics, started a frenetic session in order to decide which King the British throne would have come to. The current majority was formed by the Whig party which supported only members of the protestant branch of the House of Stuarts (Sophie, the the Mother of Elector George Ludwig of Hanover and granddaughter of King James I had the closest ties to the Stuart Dynasty), while the minority formed by the Tory party was supporting a more conservative choice, to call the catholic senior branch of the Stuarts back to the throne. James Stuart, legitimate ruler deprived of the throne during the Glorious Revolution has taken the opportunity to offer himself as a constitutional monarch and won over enough of Parliament to rise to the throne as James III. But the recall of the former James II and of his dictatorial rule was still very strong for the members of Parliament, what should we do?

Actions

A. Side with the Whigs and the Hanover party

  • Stability +1
  • Global revolt risk -5 for 60 months
  • Gain a royal marriage with Hanover
  • Gain Hanover as vassals
  • Gain an alliance with Hanover
  • +100 relations with Hanover
  • -75 relations with Scotland
  • -50 relations with France

B. Side with the Tories and the Stuart party

  • Stability -1
  • Global revolt risk +5 for 60 months
  • Land -1
  • Monarch James III ° becomes active
  • Monarch Charles III ° becomes active
  • Monarch Henry IX ° becomes active
  • Monarch Mary III * becomes active
  • Monarch George I will never rule
  • Monarch George II will never rule
  • Monarch George III will never rule
  • +150 relations with France
  • +100 relations with Scotland
  • -50 relations with Hanover
  • Gain a royal marriage with Scotland
  • Gain a temporary casus belli against Hanover for 60 months
  • Event 276014 - The Return of the Stuarts for Scotland is triggered immediately

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 1 days of June 17, 1714
Checked again every 1 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after June 19, 1714)
unless prevented by
Action B of 5057 - The Royal Society and Royal Greenwich Observatory for England

Description

The problem of finding the longitude at sea was of the highest importance. During the 17th century there were many proposals, usually very sound from a theoretical point of view, but very impractical. In the 18th century England decided to attack the problem. Between 1690 and 1707 there were a number of incidents in which English naval ships were lost at sea because they had lost their positions. In 1714 Parliament set up a Committee whose members included Newton and Halley to report on the longitude problem, and thought the time had come to make a radical move and on 16 June 1714 they passed an Act 'for providing a publick reward for such person or persons as shall discover the longitude... to a sum of ten thousand pounds, if it determines the said longitude to one degree of a great circle or sixty geographical miles... and to twenty thousand pounds, if it determines the same to one half of the same distance'.

Actions

A. Provide a public reward

  • -100 gold
  • Monarch's administrative skill +2 for 12 months
  • Infrastructure tech investment: +50

B. Bah, it's not worth the money

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch James III ° is active
  • The following must not occur:

Will happen on August 1, 1714

Description

In early XVIIIth century the Parliament, which was growing more and more powerful over the years as result of a monarchy almost disinterested in domestic affairs, started a frenetic session in order to decide which dynasty should be more suitable to represent less disrespectfully the country and deserve the British throne. The current majority was formed by the Tory party which supported the more conservative choice to confirm the current Stuarts on the throne, while the minority formed by the Whig party was supporting the German branch of the House of Stuarts (Sophie, mother of the Elector George Ludwig of Hanover and granddaughter of King James I had the closest ties to the Stuart dynasty). Will King James III take the opportunity to offer himself as a more constitutional monarch and win over enough of Parliament to preserve his crown or is a new dynasty of foreing Kings going to settle down in England as uncontested rulers of the newborn British World Empire?

Actions

A. Side with the Tories and the Stuart party

  • Stability +1
  • Global revolt risk -5 for 60 months
  • Serfdom -1
  • Monarch Charles III ° becomes active
  • Monarch Henry IX ° becomes active
  • Monarch Mary III * becomes active
  • Monarch George I will never rule
  • Monarch George II will never rule
  • Monarch George III will never rule
  • +150 relations with Scotland
  • -50 relations with Hanover
  • Gain a royal marriage with Scotland
  • Gain a temporary casus belli against Hanover for 60 months

B. Side with the Whigs and the Hanover party

  • Stability -1
  • Global revolt risk +5 for 60 months
  • Aristocracy -1
  • Land +1
  • Gain a royal marriage with Hanover
  • Gain Hanover as vassals
  • Gain an alliance with Hanover
  • +100 relations with Hanover
  • -75 relations with Scotland
  • -50 relations with France

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on August 1, 1714

Description

On July 12th, 1712, Richard IV's eighty-five year-old body finally gave up on him. The ancient heir of Oliver Cromwell died, not at Whitehall or at Windsor, but in a chair by the fire in his father's old home in Huntingdon - the same room in which he was born. Over a decade earlier, Richard had signed the Act of Settlement, promising the crown to the Protestant successors of James I by way of Sophia, Electress of Hanover. Despite his natural distain for the English and their strange customs, George was a capable soldier and a gifted administrator, previously serving as both Field Marshal and Imperial Archtreasurer respectively. However long and complacent Richard IV's reign may have been, it did garner this unlikely success. By 1714, the Kingdom bequeathed to the House of Hanover was in virtual anarchy. Not only had it gone without a head of state for over two years, but the vast sums of money required to continue her participation in the War of Spanish Succession had resulted in Parliament declaring national bankruptcy twice since 1708. German or not, the arrival of Prince George in the summer of 1714 could not have come at a better moment.

Actions

A. What could be worse than another Stuart?

  • Stability +1
  • Global revolt risk -5 for 60 months
  • Gain a royal marriage with Hanover
  • Gain Hanover as vassals
  • Gain an alliance with Hanover
  • +100 relations with Hanover
  • -75 relations with Scotland
  • -50 relations with France

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on August 1, 1714

Description

On July 12th, 1712, Richard IV's eighty-five year-old body finally gave up on him. The ancient heir of Oliver Cromwell died, not at Whitehall or at Windsor, but in a chair by the fire in his father's old home in Huntingdon - the same room in which he was born. Over a decade earlier, Richard had signed the Act of Settlement, promising the crown to the Protestant successors of James I by way of Sophia, Electress of Hanover. Despite his natural distain for the English and their strange customs, George was a capable soldier and a gifted administrator, previously serving as both Field Marshal and Imperial Archtreasurer respectively. However long and complacent Richard IV's reign may have been, it did garner this unlikely success. By 1714, the Kingdom bequeathed to the House of Hanover was in virtual anarchy. Not only had it gone without a head of state for over two years, but the vast sums of money required to continue her participation in the War of Spanish Succession had resulted in Parliament declaring national bankruptcy twice since 1708. German or not, the arrival of Prince George in the summer of 1714 could not have come at a better moment.

Actions

A. What could be worse than another Stuart?

  • Flag graphics extension set to "Union"
  • Stability +1
  • Global revolt risk -5 for 60 months
  • Gain a royal marriage with Hanover
  • Gain Hanover as vassals
  • Gain an alliance with Hanover
  • +100 relations with Hanover
  • -75 relations with Scotland
  • -50 relations with France

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Hanover is a vassal of England
  • Own Connaught
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Monarch George I is active
    • Monarch George II is active
  • The following must not occur:
    • Flag [Anglo-Irish_Tax_Connaught] is set

Will happen within 30 days of August 2, 1714
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1760)

Description

In the personal union of Hanover and England, it was agreed to keep separate budgets for both countries, and the King was not allowed to cover Hanoveranian expenses with English taxes, and vice versa. Yet King George I and King George II felt strong ties to Hanover and tried secretly to transfer some funds to the German administration and to pension of Hanoveranian officials with English money. As the taxes collected in England were watched closely by Parliament, the King relied on the Irish Tax, which was not watched very closely.

Actions

A. Relocate Irish Taxes for Hanoveranian Purposes

  • -1 base tax value in Connaught
  • +50 relations with Hanover
  • Event 48015 - Our King sends financial aid for Hanover is triggered immediately
  • Set flag [Anglo-Irish_Tax_Connaught] for events

B. Do Not Mess with British Money!

  • -10 relations with Hanover

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Hanover is a vassal of England
  • Own Ulster
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Monarch George I is active
    • Monarch George II is active
  • The following must not occur:
    • Flag [Anglo-Irish_Tax_Ulster] is set

Will happen within 30 days of August 2, 1714
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1760)

Description

In the personal union of Hanover and England, it was agreed to keep separate budgets for both countries, and the King was not allowed to cover Hanoveranian expenses with English taxes, and vice versa. Yet King George I and King George II felt strong ties to Hanover and tried secretly to transfer some funds to the German administration and to pension of Hanoveranian officials with English money. As the taxes collected in England were watched closely by Parliament, the King relied on the Irish Tax, which was not watched very closely.

Actions

A. Relocate Irish Taxes for Hanoveranian Purposes

  • -1 base tax value in Ulster
  • +50 relations with Hanover
  • Event 48017 - Our King sends financial aid for Hanover is triggered immediately
  • Set flag [Anglo-Irish_Tax_Ulster] for events

B. Do Not Mess with British Money!

  • -10 relations with Hanover

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Hanover is a vassal of England
  • Own Meath
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Monarch George I is active
    • Monarch George II is active
  • The following must not occur:
    • Flag [Anglo-Irish_Tax_Meath] is set

Will happen within 30 days of August 2, 1714
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1760)

Description

In the personal union of Hanover and England, it was agreed to keep separate budgets for both countries, and the King was not allowed to cover Hanoveranian expenses with English taxes, and vice versa. Yet King George I and King George II felt strong ties to Hanover and tried secretly to transfer some funds to the German administration and to pension of Hanoveranian officials with English money. As the taxes collected in England were watched closely by Parliament, the King relied on the Irish Tax, which was not watched very closely.

Actions

A. Relocate Irish Taxes for Hanoveranian Purposes

B. Do Not Mess with British Money!

  • -10 relations with Hanover

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Hanover is a vassal of England
  • Own Leinster
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Monarch George I is active
    • Monarch George II is active
  • The following must not occur:
    • Flag [Anglo-Irish_Tax_Leinster] is set

Will happen within 30 days of August 2, 1714
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1760)

Description

In the personal union of Hanover and England, it was agreed to keep separate budgets for both countries, and the King was not allowed to cover Hanoveranian expenses with English taxes, and vice versa. Yet King George I and King George II felt strong ties to Hanover and tried secretly to transfer some funds to the German administration and to pension of Hanoveranian officials with English money. As the taxes collected in England were watched closely by Parliament, the King relied on the Irish Tax, which was not watched very closely.

Actions

A. Relocate Irish Taxes for Hanoveranian Purposes

  • -1 base tax value in Leinster
  • +50 relations with Hanover
  • Event 48021 - Our King sends financial aid for Hanover is triggered immediately
  • Set flag [Anglo-Irish_Tax_Leinster] for events

B. Do Not Mess with British Money!

  • -10 relations with Hanover

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Hanover is a vassal of England
  • Own Munster
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Monarch George I is active
    • Monarch George II is active
  • The following must not occur:
    • Flag [Anglo-Irish_Tax_Munster] is set

Will happen within 30 days of August 2, 1714
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1760)

Description

In the personal union of Hanover and England, it was agreed to keep separate budgets for both countries, and the King was not allowed to cover Hanoveranian expenses with English taxes, and vice versa. Yet King George I and King George II felt strong ties to Hanover and tried secretly to transfer some funds to the German administration and to pension of Hanoveranian officials with English money. As the taxes collected in England were watched closely by Parliament, the King relied on the Irish Tax, which was not watched very closely.

Actions

A. Relocate Irish Taxes for Hanoveranian Purposes

  • -1 base tax value in Munster
  • +50 relations with Hanover
  • Event 48023 - Our King sends financial aid for Hanover is triggered immediately
  • Set flag [Anglo-Irish_Tax_Munster] for events

B. Do Not Mess with British Money!

  • -10 relations with Hanover

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on August 2, 1714
unless prevented by
Action A, B, C of 48011 - Claim the English Throne for Hanover

Description

Despite the Act of Settlement, there is no living heir of Protestant faith, as the Hanoveranian Elector is a Catholic! Should we try to convince him to convert?

Actions

A. Ask George of Hanover to Convert

B. James III Stuart will be King

  • Monarch James III ° becomes active
  • Monarch Charles III ° becomes active
  • Monarch Henry IX ° becomes active
  • Monarch Mary III * becomes active
  • Monarch George I will never rule
  • Monarch George II will never rule
  • Monarch George III will never rule
  • +150 relations with France
  • Stability -1
  • Global revolt risk +3 for 60 months
  • +100 relations with Scotland
  • Gain a royal marriage with Scotland
  • Event 276013 - The Return of the Stuarts for Scotland is triggered immediately

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen on August 2, 1714

Description

The 1701 Act of Establishment had been voted to regulate the succession to the throne, ensuring no Catholic dynasty would ever rule England. When the personal union with Holland had ended in 1702 (death of William of Orange), his daughter Queen Ann (1702-1714) reigned but failed to provide a legitimate heir. The English crown went to George I of Hanover (1714-1727), her most direct parent. He and his son George II (1727-1760) were German born and would always follow closely the fate of their Electorate, making it in fact if not in law a vassal of England.

Actions

A. Ahh Yes

  • Grant independence to Hanover
  • +100 relations with Hanover
  • Monarch James III ° will never rule

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch George I is active
  • None of the following must occur:

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1715
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1720)
unless prevented by
Action A of 164051 - The Jacobites recover their Kingdom for England

Description

This rebellion of the Jacobite cause led by the Earl of Mar began in 1715. By the end of September, most of the Highlands were in his control and his army numbered some 5,000 with more appearing daily. But all this was done without even notifying the King they were claiming to support. The Old Pretender, King James III, was not even aware of the situation as of yet. Word was sent to the King, and the size of the force continued to grow. The Earl, with his growing army, moved to Perth and established his base there after taking the city. Meanwhile another Jacobite army was forming to the south, The Old Pretender hearing the news began to make preparations for his trip to Scotland and his crowning. By early November, the northern Jacobite army numbered some 12,000, mostly Clansmen from the Highlands. The Earl then decided to march south where he soon met the army of the Duke of Argyll, the only remaining government troops in Scotland. The Jacobite forces were mismanaged and split. The southern army marched south to raise Lancashire instead of turning on the Duke of Argyll's flank, while a much smaller force under the Duke defeated the larger northern army of the Jacobites at Sherrrifmuir on November 13th. The southern army was also met and defeated at Preston by other government forces in England. The Jacobites were forced to retreat to Perth, while still waiting for their leader to arrive. The Old Pretender finally arrived in Scotland on the 22nd of December after leaving fittingly enough from Dunkirk. But the matter was already settled, as the Duke of Argyll was already receiving reinforcements of experienced troops and was preparing an overwhelming force to march north. The King, James III, was again forced to retreat after spending a dismal six weeks in Scotland.

Actions

A. We will smash them!

  • Global revolt risk +3 for 24 months
  • -150 relations with France
  • Stability +1

B. The Stuarts take back the throne!

  • Monarch James III ° becomes active
  • Monarch Charles III ° becomes active
  • Monarch Henry IX ° becomes active
  • Monarch Mary III * becomes active
  • Monarch George I will never rule
  • Monarch George II will never rule
  • Monarch George III will never rule
  • Global revolt risk +3 for 60 months
  • +150 relations with France
  • Stability -1
  • -300 relations with Hanover

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Serfdom is at 3 or higher
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Massachusetts
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Delaware
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Santee

Will happen within 500 days of January 2, 1720
Checked again every 500 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1730)
unless prevented by
Action B of 21068 - The Transportation of Convicts for England

Description

Convicts from the British Isles formed a significant component of pre-Revolution British North America, especially as their situation made them a labour force ideal for the sorts of outdoor tasks that the more established colonists considered beneath them.

Actions

A. Convicts Begin a New Life in the Colonies

  • +500 population in Massachusetts
  • +250 population in Connecticut
  • +750 population in Manhattan
  • +750 population in Delaware
  • +750 population in Chesapeake
  • +500 population in Roanoke
  • +250 population in Santee
  • +250 population in Carolina
  • -500 population in Yorkshire
  • -500 population in Midlands
  • -500 population in Bristol

England — Not random

Will happen on December 2, 1720

Description

The South Seas Company was originally chartered to trade with Spanish possessions in South America. Through dishonest means and speculation, the stock soared, and the company promised to take over 60 percent of the national debt. The attractive interest rates drew investors in droves, and the stock soared from 128 to 1000 from January to August 1720. This was the Bubble, which burst later that year, dropping the stock to 124, ruining both great and small investors. The Government was also implicated, with three Ministers of the Crown and both King's mistresses implicated in corruption and bribery. The effect on the economy and the country was severe.

Actions

A. The Bubble Bursts

  • +5% inflation
  • Stability -1
  • Global revolt risk +3 for 60 months
  • -300 gold

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch George I is active

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1721
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1722)

Description

Robert Walpole, Earl of Orford (1676-1745) was appointed War Minister in 1708. Compromised in many scandals, he loses his functions but is recalled upon the advent of the Hanoverian dynasty. He fervent partisan of European overall peace and balance, he dominated English political life from 1721 to 1742, as First Lord and Exchequer, a Prime Minister in fact if not in title.

Actions

A. An Excellent Minister!

  • Monarch's diplomatic skill +3 for 240 months
  • Monarch's administrative skill +3 for 240 months
  • Monarch's military skill +3 for 240 months
  • Stability +3

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Own The Highlands
  • Own The Grampians
  • Own Lothian
  • Own Strathclyde
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Massachusetts
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Delaware
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Santee

Will happen within 500 days of January 2, 1725
Checked again every 500 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1730)

Description

After the Scottish Act of Union, Scottish merchants and labourers from the Lowlands took advantage of their association with the British Empire to emigrate to British North America. In particular, Scottish merchants played an important role in the Chesapeake tobacco trade, ensuring that by 1760 Glasgow had surpassed London as Britain's leading tobacco port.

Actions

A. Lowland Scots Migrate to the New World

  • +2500 population in Manhattan
  • +3500 population in Delaware
  • +3000 population in Chesapeake
  • +1 base tax value in Chesapeake
  • -2000 population in Lothian
  • -2000 population in Strathclyde

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 500 days of January 2, 1730
Checked again every 500 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1740)

Description

Almost from the moment the Navigation Act was adopted, ways were found to circumvent the restrictions imposed by the Act. Enforcing mercantilism became increasingly expensive and difficult, and smuggling became endemic. Local depressions or surpluses increased the pressure for local interests to be granted special treatment. Often it was easier to surrender to such demands than oppose them. Irish linen in 1704, sugar destined for Europe in 1739, and southern rice in the 1760s all were exempted from the provisions of the Navigation Act. So many exemptions had been granted by the Napoleonic Wars that the Navigation Act had been rendered almost meaningless.

Actions

A. Allow Exemptions to the Navigation Act

  • Mercantilism -1
  • Trade tech investment: +250
  • +2 merchants

B. The Current Policy is Acceptable

  • Stability -1
  • Trade tech investment: -100
  • -2 merchants

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Serfdom is at 4 or higher
  • Aristocracy is at 4 or higher
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Massachusetts
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Delaware
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Santee

Will happen within 500 days of January 2, 1730
Checked again every 500 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1740)

Description

Indentured Servants were immigrants that, in exchange for the cost of passage and maintenance, were required to spent a period of years in the service of other, generally wealthy, colonists, often working in agriculture. These indentured servants were a major source of immigration into British North America, and the practice continued well into the 1700s.

Actions

A. Indentured Servants Cross the Atlantic to a New Life

  • +750 population in Massachusetts
  • +250 population in Connecticut
  • +1250 population in Manhattan
  • +1500 population in Delaware
  • +750 population in Chesapeake
  • +500 population in Roanoke
  • +250 population in Santee
  • +250 population in Carolina
  • -1500 population in Anglia
  • -500 population in Yorkshire

England — Not random

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1737
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1740)

Description

The War of Jenkins's Ear (which merged into the War of the Austrian Succession) was the result, amongst other things, of a minor, alleged confrontation between Spanish Guarda Costas and the Captain and crew of the Glasgow brig 'Rebecca' in 1731. Captain Jenkins claimed that, whilst in the Caribbean, his ship had been boarded by the Guarda Costa and his crew maltreated, and that the Spaniards had then cut off one of his ears. Additionally, he claimed he was tortured and threatened with death. There were no major actions fought during this war, although the declaration of war led to the dispatch of Anson's squadron to attack the coast of South America, and to finally circumnavigate the globe, and Admiral Edward Vernon's fleet attacked Spanish territory in the Caribbean.

Actions

A. Use it as an excuse for War

  • Gain a temporary casus belli against Spain for 24 months
  • -150 relations with Spain
  • Stability +1

B. Try not to severe our relation too much

  • -50 relations with Spain
  • Stability -1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • The following must not occur:
    • Serfdom is at 6 or higher
  • The following must not occur:
    • Aristocracy is at 6 or higher
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Massachusetts
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Delaware
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Santee

Will happen within 500 days of January 2, 1740
Checked again every 500 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1750)

Description

By the middle of the 1700s, an increasing number of the immigrants arriving in British North America were skilled or semi-skilled labourers. As opposed to the unskilled labourers, who arrived in the New World to escape poverty in the British Isles, these skilled or semi-skilled labourers saw emigration across the Atlantic as an opportunity to achieve prosperity. These new immigrants in turn helped the burgeoning economy of the British colonies to further expand.

Actions

A. Skilled Labourers Cross the Atlantic

  • +1000 population in Massachusetts
  • +250 population in Connecticut
  • +1500 population in Manhattan
  • +2000 population in Delaware
  • +250 population in Susquehanna
  • +1000 population in Chesapeake
  • +250 population in Powhatan
  • +500 population in Roanoke
  • +250 population in Santee
  • +250 population in Carolina
  • +1 base tax value in Manhattan
  • +1 base tax value in Delaware
  • +1 base tax value in Chesapeake
  • -2000 population in Anglia
  • -500 population in Yorkshire
  • -500 population in Lancashire

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 1000 days of January 2, 1740
Checked again every 1000 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1780)

Description

Two brothers, John and Charles Wesley, started a revival group known as Methodism. This group had a focus on learning the bible, Singing hymns and receiving communion and was found mostly amongst the peasantry. The Wesley Brothers wanted their new group to be part of the Anglican church but their followers did want to be part of what they saw to be a moribund church and the Anglican Bishops felt threatened. This movement took root in Wales and the West Country and was found in the colonies. So a new church was born the Methodist Connexion.

Actions

A. Let Wesley Preach

  • +3 missionaries
  • Wales converts to the state religion
  • +1 base tax value in Wales
  • Cornwall converts to the state religion
  • Bristol converts to the state religion
  • Delaware converts to the state religion
  • +1 base tax value in Delaware
  • A random province in Americas converts to the state religion
  • A random province in Americas converts to the state religion

B. Suppress Wesley

  • Innovativeness -1
  • Wales revolts
  • Religion in Wales changes to protestant
  • A random province in Americas converts to the state religion

C. Incorporate Wesley and the Methodist Connexion into the Church of England

  • Innovativeness +1
  • +4 missionaries
  • Stability -2
  • Wales converts to the state religion
  • +1 base tax value in Wales
  • Cornwall converts to the state religion
  • Bristol converts to the state religion
  • Delaware converts to the state religion
  • +1 base tax value in Delaware
  • A random province in Americas converts to the state religion
  • A random province in Americas converts to the state religion
  • A random province in Americas converts to the state religion

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 1000 days of January 2, 1740
Checked again every 1000 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1780)

Description

Two brothers, John and Charles Wesley, started a revival group known as Methodism. This group had a focus on learning the bible, Singing hymns and receiving communion it was found mostly amongst the peasantry. The Methodist Connexion was quite at odds with the Catholic Faith of the country and was brutally suppressed by the authorities.

Actions

A. Suppress Wesley

  • Innovativeness -1
  • Stability -1
  • Wales revolts
  • A random province in Americas converts to the state religion

B. Ignore Wesley

  • Innovativeness +1
  • Religion in Wales changes to protestant
  • Religion in Cornwall changes to protestant
  • A random province in Americas converts to the state religion

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 1000 days of January 2, 1740
Checked again every 1000 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1780)

Description

Two brothers, John and Charles Wesley, started a revival group known as Methodism. This group had a focus on learning the bible, Singing hymns and receiving communion and was found mostly amongst the peasantry. It was quite different from the dry as dust Puritan faith of England at the Time. The Authorities couldn't make up their mind whether to use it to revive the Faith of England or to suppress it.

Actions

A. Suppress Wesley

  • Innovativeness -1
  • Stability -1
  • Wales revolts

B. Ignore Wesley

  • Innovativeness +1
  • Religion in Wales changes to protestant
  • Religion in Cornwall changes to protestant

C. Methodist Connexion is the new Church in England

  • Change religion to protestant
  • Innovativeness +1
  • +4 missionaries
  • Wales converts to the state religion
  • +1 base tax value in Wales
  • Cornwall converts to the state religion
  • Bristol converts to the state religion
  • Delaware converts to the state religion
  • +1 base tax value in Delaware
  • Religion in a random province in Americas changes to protestant
  • Religion in a random province in Americas changes to protestant
  • Religion in a random province in Americas changes to protestant

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch George II is active
  • Stability is at -1 or higher

Will happen within 90 days of April 2, 1741
Checked again every 90 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after April 2, 1755)

Description

Born in Halle in the same year as Bach, Handel studied with Zachau, and became a friend of Mattheson. In 1703 he was appointed violinist-composer for Hamburg's German opera. Handel sojourned in Italy in 1706 where he met Corelli, and both Scarlattis. His return to Hanover, four years later, was to assume the post of Kapellmeister to the Elector (soon to become George I of England). In 1712 Handel moved to London where, upon the accession of the house of Hanover, he gained immediate access to the royal circle of England. Handel's London years were occupied primarily with the writing of Italian operas. After suffering a stroke and the failure of his operas, due to cahnge in the public's tastes, Handel wrote oratorios, including 'Messiah' (1741). In addition to operas and oratorios, Handel wrote Psalms, motets, anthems, passions, cantatas, instrumental chamber works, and works for keyboard (primarily harpsichord).

Actions

A. We have the greatest composer of all times

  • +15 victory points
  • Infrastructure tech investment: +25

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1742
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after April 2, 1742)

Description

The Pragmatic Sanction, solemnly rendered by Emperor Charles VI on 19th April 1713, established the indivisibility of the Habsburg patrimony, and ruled the order of succession by order of first born child, even to a woman. This made Maria-Theresa, born in 1717, the heir of the Empire. The Pragmatic Sanction was recognized by Spain in 1725 (confirmed in 1731), Russia in 1726, Prussia in 1728, the United Provinces in 1731, Hanover in 1732, the Heiliges Reich (except Bavaria) in 1732 and France in 1738 only. Bavarian refusal would lead to the War of the Austrian Succession.

Actions

A. Pro-Habsburg

  • Gain a temporary casus belli against France for 36 months
  • Gain a temporary casus belli against Prussia for 36 months
  • -150 relations with Bavaria
  • -150 relations with Saxony
  • -150 relations with Prussia
  • -150 relations with France
  • +150 relations with Netherlands
  • +100 relations with Russia
  • +150 relations with Hesse
  • +150 relations with Hanover
  • +150 relations with Austria
  • Stability +1

B. Neutral

  • -50 relations with Bavaria
  • -50 relations with Saxony
  • -50 relations with Prussia
  • -50 relations with France
  • -50 relations with Netherlands
  • -50 relations with Russia
  • -100 relations with Hesse
  • -100 relations with Hanover
  • -100 relations with Austria
  • Stability -1
  • Gain a temporary casus belli against France for 12 months
  • Gain a temporary casus belli against Spain for 12 months

C. Anti-Habsburg

  • Gain a temporary casus belli against Austria for 12 months
  • Gain a temporary casus belli against Russia for 12 months
  • +150 relations with Bavaria
  • +150 relations with Saxony
  • +150 relations with Prussia
  • +150 relations with France
  • -150 relations with Netherlands
  • -150 relations with Russia
  • +100 relations with Hesse
  • +100 relations with Hanover
  • -150 relations with Austria
  • Stability +1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch George II is active
  • None of the following must occur:

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1745
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1749)
unless prevented by
Action A of 164054 - The Jacobites recover their Kingdom for England
Action A of 164052 - The last Jacobite threat for England
Action B of 164053 - The last Jacobite threat for England

Description

In 1745, the war of the Austrian Succession was raging in Europe. England had most of her troops busy in the Austrian Netherlands. The time seemed ripe for Charles-Edward Stuart (1720-1788) to boldly land in Scotland. He and his Jacobite supporters managed to beat an English army at Prestonpans on October 2nd, 1745 and entered Edinburgh where he had his father James recognized as King of Scotland. At the head of a small army, he then invaded England as far as Derby, but had to retreat when promised French support did not materialized (the intended landing of French troops had failed). Caught up by the British army under Cumberland (recalled from the Low Countries), he is soundly defeated at Culloden on 16th April, 1746. This was the best shot the Stuarts ever got to reclaim the throne, but the rash young prince did not listen to the sober advice of his Generals, thus forever burying the Stuart cause.

Actions

A. We will smash them!

  • Global revolt risk +5 for 24 months
  • -150 relations with France
  • Stability +1

B. The Stuarts take back the throne!

  • Monarch James III ° becomes active
  • Monarch Charles III ° becomes active
  • Monarch Henry IX ° becomes active
  • Monarch Mary III * becomes active
  • Monarch George II will never rule
  • Monarch George III will never rule
  • Global revolt risk +3 for 60 months
  • +150 relations with France
  • Stability -1
  • -300 relations with Hanover

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 360 days of January 2, 1746
Checked again every 360 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 31, 1819)
unless prevented by
Action A of 276002 - The capital problem for Scotland

Description

After the Jacobite Rising of 1745, the English and the Scots finally decided to break forever the power of the Highland clans, who were both Catholic and fiercely loyal to the Stuarts. The landscape of the Highlands had already been tamed with a network of military roads. The clan chiefs were encouraged to become absentee landlords in Edinburgh or London. Gaelic dress and traditions were forbidden, except in the new Highland regiments of the British army, where the symbols of a defeated civilization were used to strike terror into the hearts of Britain's enemies.

Actions

A. Break the Power of the Highland Clans

  • Culture in The Highlands changes to english
  • Culture in The Grampians changes to english
  • Culture in Lothian changes to english
  • Culture in Strathclyde changes to english
  • -200 gold
  • Offensive Doctrine +1

B. Let the Highland Clans Remain As They Are

  • Revolt risk value in The Highlands +1
  • Revolt risk value in The Grampians +1
  • Culture in Lothian changes to english
  • Culture in Strathclyde changes to english

England — Not random

Conditions

  • The following must not occur:
    • All of the following must occur:

Will happen within 200 days of January 2, 1750
Checked again every 200 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1750)

Description

Scotsman David Hume was one of the foremost philosophers of his day who is best known for his philosophical empiricism and skepticism. Taking the scientific method of the English physicist Sir Isaac Newton as his model and building on the epistemology of the English philosopher John Locke Hume tried to describe how the mind works in acquiring what is called knowledge. He concluded that no theory of reality is possible - there can be no knowledge of anything beyond experience.

Actions

A. OK

  • Infrastructure tech investment: +250

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Event 21114 - Raleigh's First Colonial Effort in North America for England has already occurred
  • Own The Highlands
  • Own The Grampians
  • Own Lothian
  • Own Strathclyde
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Massachusetts
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Delaware
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Santee

Will happen within 500 days of January 2, 1750
Checked again every 500 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1760)

Description

Changes in the Scottish Highlands in the mid-1700s resulted in significant waves of emigration across the Atlantic. Not only did the aftermath of the '45 Rising drive many out as the traditional clan system was destroyed, but economic changes in the region, included agrarian improvement and rent inflation, pushed many Highland Scots off their land and in search of new opportunities overseas.

Actions

A. Highland Scots Flee Across the Atlantic

  • +1500 population in Manhattan
  • +2000 population in Delaware
  • +1000 population in Chesapeake
  • -1500 population in The Highlands
  • -2000 population in The Grampians

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Howrah
    • Own Odisa
    • Own Berhampur
    • Own Palakimedi
    • Own Yanam
    • Own Madras
    • Own Pondicherry
    • Own Cochin
    • Own Trivandrum
    • Own Mangalore
    • Own Kerala
    • Own Bombay
    • Own Goa

Will happen within 10 days of January 2, 1750
Checked again every 10 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1760)

Description

Created two years before its Dutch equivalent, the English East India Company had a difficult start. Its first trading posts in the Moluccas (Amboina) and Indonesia were soon overwhelmed and closed by the Dutch and activity concentrated to India (Madras, Bombay, Calcutta). It is there that she would know its greatest success, from a small trading ventures of harbor factories to the large Indian Empire build by Warren Hastings and Robert Clive (from 1757 onwards) that would control most of the Indian subcontinent. The company would outlast all its competitors and would only be taken over by the British government in 1867, in the wake of the great Sepoy revolt of 1857.

Actions

A. We will exploit this!

  • Trade tech investment: +2000
  • Gain Goods Manufactory in a random province
  • Gain Refinery in a random province
  • +6 merchants
  • +500 gold
  • Stability +1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Monarch George II is active

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1757
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1758)

Description

William Pitt, the first Pitt.(1708-1778) was the grandson of the Governor of Madras. Initially destined for a military career, he became a deputy in the Commons, member of the Whigs and an ardent patriot. Striving to give England a world maritime empire, he leads the coalition government of 1757 despite the profound hatred of George II and obtained decisive results in Canada and India. His departure in 1763 saved France from the toughest clauses of the Treaty of Paris ending the Seven Years War. Back to power in 1766-1778 despite his poor health, he advocated war against France in 1778.

Actions

A. An Excellent Minister!

  • Monarch's diplomatic skill +4 for 240 months
  • Monarch's administrative skill +3 for 240 months
  • Monarch's military skill +3 for 240 months
  • Stability +3

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 30 days of January 2, 1759
Checked again every 30 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1763)

Description

In 1759, Arthur Guinness bought a run down brewery in Dublin and built it up to greatness.

Actions

A. A Brewery is Founded

  • Trade tech investment: +100
  • Infrastructure tech investment: +100
  • +1 base tax value in Meath
  • Gain Refinery in Meath

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Savannah
    • Own Carolina
    • Own Santee
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Susquehanna
    • Own Delaware
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Catskill
    • Own Adirondak
    • Own Sebago
    • Own Connecticut
    • Own Massachusetts
    • Own Penobscot
  • At least one of the following must occur:

Will happen within 1800 days of January 2, 1760
Checked again every 1800 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1765)

Description

As the English colonists in America had to fend for themselves against Indians, French and Spanish troops there evolved a certain kind of self-assurance, a pride of their own. They started to get a self-identity that was not English but American. This fact would increase the fire of the American Revolution in the 1770's.

Actions

A. OK

  • Revolt risk value in Savannah +2
  • Revolt risk value in Carolina +2
  • Revolt risk value in Santee +2
  • Revolt risk value in Roanoke +2
  • Revolt risk value in Chesapeake +2
  • Revolt risk value in Susquehanna +2
  • Revolt risk value in Delaware +2
  • Revolt risk value in Manhattan +2
  • Revolt risk value in Catskill +2
  • Revolt risk value in Adirondak +2
  • Revolt risk value in Sebago +2
  • Revolt risk value in Connecticut +2
  • Revolt risk value in Massachusetts +2
  • Revolt risk value in Alabama +2
  • Revolt risk value in Alleghany +2
  • Revolt risk value in Catawba +2
  • Revolt risk value in Appalache +2
  • Revolt risk value in Powhatan +2
  • Revolt risk value in Shenandoah +2
  • Revolt risk value in Irondekoit +2
  • Revolt risk value in Tuscarora +2
  • Revolt risk value in Oswego +2
  • Revolt risk value in Mohawk +2
  • Revolt risk value in Onondaga +2
  • Revolt risk value in Ticonderoga +2
  • Revolt risk value in Penobscot +2
  • Revolt risk value in Bangor +2

England — Not random

Conditions

  • Serfdom is at 3 or higher
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Massachusetts
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Delaware
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Santee

Will happen within 500 days of January 2, 1760
Checked again every 500 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1770)
unless prevented by
Action B of 21068 - The Transportation of Convicts for England

Description

Convicts from the British Isles formed a significant component of pre-Revolution British North America, especially as their situation made them a labour force ideal for the sorts of outdoor tasks that the more established colonists considered beneath them.

Actions

A. Convicts Begin a New Life in the Colonies

  • +750 population in Massachusetts
  • +250 population in Connecticut
  • +1250 population in Manhattan
  • +1500 population in Delaware
  • +750 population in Chesapeake
  • +500 population in Roanoke
  • +250 population in Santee
  • +250 population in Carolina
  • +250 population in Savannah
  • -100 population in Anglia
  • -500 population in Wessex
  • -500 population in Cornwall

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 120 days of March 2, 1761
Checked again every 120 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 30, 1761)
unless prevented by
Action B of 5058 - Finding the longitude at sea for England

Description

According to Newton, the most promising method for finding the longitude at sea was the clock method, which was to eventually to succeed. Basically the clock was set on departure and kept an absolute time which could be compared with the local time on arrival. The east/west distance travelled could then be calculated. The problem was the inexactitude of the clocks at that time. Finally John Harrison built an extremely precise clock, his first clock was built in 1715, and by 1727 he had made a very fine clock with a 'gridiron' pendulum which consisted of nine alternating steel and brass rods to eliminate the effects of temperature changes (the clock is now known as H1). H2 was built in 1739 with further innovative features. Finally H4 was completed in 1761, and satisfied all the conditions. The problem had been solved!

Actions

A. Good news!

  • Infrastructure tech investment: +100
  • Naval tech investment: +350

England — Not random

Conditions

Will happen within 50 days of January 2, 1763
Checked again every 50 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after December 31, 1819)
unless prevented by
Action A of 4983 - The Treaty of Paris for England
Action A of 4984 - The Treaty of Paris for England

Description

After England took the total control of Northern America, its government decided to restrict the colonizable zone - from the States or Colonies of the future USA - to the Appalachian Mountains. This decision dissatisfied the English colonists and threw first seeds of the future Independence War.

Actions

A. They will be angry...

  • Biloxi will no longer be considered a national province
  • Mobile will no longer be considered a national province
  • Yazoo will no longer be considered a national province
  • Tuscaloosa will no longer be considered a national province
  • Tennessee will no longer be considered a national province
  • Illinois will no longer be considered a national province
  • Miamis will no longer be considered a national province
  • Kentucky will no longer be considered a national province
  • Erie will no longer be considered a national province
  • Hindua will no longer be considered a national province
  • Fox will no longer be considered a national province
  • Milwaukee will no longer be considered a national province

England — Not random

Conditions

  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Savannah
    • Own Carolina
    • Own Santee
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Susquehanna
    • Own Delaware
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Catskill
    • Own Adirondak
    • Own Sebago
    • Own Connecticut
    • Own Massachusetts
    • Own Penobscot
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • All of the following must occur:
      • At least one of the following must occur:
        • Monarch James III ° is active
        • Monarch James III ° is active
      • At least one of the following must occur:
        • All of the following must occur:
          • The following must not occur:
            • Innovativeness is at 9 or higher
          • At least one of the following must occur:
            • State religion is catholic
            • State religion is counterreform
        • All of the following must occur:
          • The following must not occur:
            • Innovativeness is at 5 or higher
          • At least one of the following must occur:
            • State religion is protestant
            • State religion is reformed
    • All of the following must occur:
      • Monarch George III is active
      • At least one of the following must occur:
        • At least one of the following must occur:
          • State religion is catholic
          • State religion is counterreform
        • All of the following must occur:
          • The following must not occur:
            • Innovativeness is at 10 or higher
          • At least one of the following must occur:
            • State religion is protestant
            • State religion is reformed
  • The following must not occur:
    • United States exists

Will happen within 350 days of January 2, 1765
Checked again every 350 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1766)

Description

In 1765-1767 the British Parliament issues the Stamp tax and numerous tolls in the American Colonies. It is view appropriate that the colonists pay for the high costs of the Seven Years War or The French and Indian Wars as it is known in America. The colonists however react spontaneously. The Congress of Massachusetts expresses a sharp protest, which is seconded by many other colonies. The most important of the agitators are Samuel Adams, who creates the 'Sons of Liberty' in Boston, and the lawyer Patrick Henry. His Majesty's government decides to send troops to America and order the Governors to dissolve the congresses of the colonies. This increases the revolutionary tendencies further...

Actions

A. Stamp tax and Tolls

  • Revolt risk value in Savannah +3
  • Revolt risk value in Carolina +3
  • Revolt risk value in Santee +3
  • Revolt risk value in Roanoke +3
  • Revolt risk value in Chesapeake +3
  • Revolt risk value in Susquehanna +3
  • Revolt risk value in Delaware +3
  • Revolt risk value in Manhattan +3
  • Revolt risk value in Catskill +3
  • Revolt risk value in Adirondak +3
  • Revolt risk value in Sebago +3
  • Revolt risk value in Connecticut +3
  • Revolt risk value in Massachusetts +3
  • Revolt risk value in Alabama +3
  • Revolt risk value in Alleghany +3
  • Revolt risk value in Catawba +3
  • Revolt risk value in Appalache +3
  • Revolt risk value in Powhatan +3
  • Revolt risk value in Shenandoah +3
  • Revolt risk value in Irondekoit +3
  • Revolt risk value in Tuscarora +3
  • Revolt risk value in Oswego +3
  • Revolt risk value in Mohawk +3
  • Revolt risk value in Onondaga +3
  • Revolt risk value in Ticonderoga +3
  • Revolt risk value in Penobscot +3
  • Revolt risk value in Bangor +3

B. Stamp tax, Defense tax and Tolls

  • Revolt risk value in Savannah +7
  • Revolt risk value in Carolina +7
  • Revolt risk value in Santee +7
  • Revolt risk value in Roanoke +7
  • Revolt risk value in Chesapeake +7
  • Revolt risk value in Susquehanna +7
  • Revolt risk value in Delaware +7
  • Revolt risk value in Manhattan +7
  • Revolt risk value in Catskill +7
  • Revolt risk value in Adirondak +7
  • Revolt risk value in Sebago +7
  • Revolt risk value in Connecticut +7
  • Revolt risk value in Massachusetts +7
  • Revolt risk value in Alabama +7
  • Revolt risk value in Alleghany +7
  • Revolt risk value in Catawba +7
  • Revolt risk value in Appalache +7
  • Revolt risk value in Powhatan +7
  • Revolt risk value in Shenandoah +7
  • Revolt risk value in Irondekoit +7
  • Revolt risk value in Tuscarora +7
  • Revolt risk value in Oswego +7
  • Revolt risk value in Mohawk +7
  • Revolt risk value in Onondaga +7
  • Revolt risk value in Ticonderoga +7
  • Revolt risk value in Penobscot +7
  • Revolt risk value in Bangor +7
  • +50 victory points
  • +500 gold
  • Stability -1

England — Not random

Conditions

  • The following must not occur:
    • Serfdom is at 6 or higher
  • The following must not occur:
    • Aristocracy is at 6 or higher
  • At least one of the following must occur:
    • Own Massachusetts
    • Own Manhattan
    • Own Delaware
    • Own Chesapeake
    • Own Roanoke
    • Own Santee

Will happen within 500 days of January 2, 1765
Checked again every 500 days until trigger is met (cannot happen after January 2, 1775)
unless prevented by
Action A of 21077 - Rebellion in British North America for England

Description

By the middle of the 1700s, an increasing number of the immigrants arriving in British North America were skilled or semi-skilled labourers. As opposed to the unskilled labourers, who arrived in the New World to escape poverty in the British Isles, these skilled or semi-skilled labourers saw emigration across the Atlantic as an opportunity to achieve prosperity. These new immigrants in turn helped the burgeoning economy of the British colonies to further expand.

Actions

A. Skilled Labourers Cross the Atlantic

  • +250 population in Penobscot
  • +250 population in Seb